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03-13-2009, 05:33 AM   #16
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Great advice! Like a lot of the other newbies I get discouraged easily, especially when I see how beautiful so many of the photographs are. I just need to do like everybody here on the posts have said, just look and learn. But especially get out there and take pictures!

03-13-2009, 06:02 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by tony13 Quote
Same here for me about the weather. It sucks at the moment, snow everywhere, it's cloudy, the light is very bad for getting any kind of picture.
Part of "creativity" is working around such environmental limitations.




Pentax K20D
Super Takumar 85/1.9


Taken on a rainy day when the light was bad.

Instead of using the rain as an excuse, I used it to create the funky blur effect. It was as simple as leaving the wipers turned off and shooting through a wet windshield.

Too dark to take photos? That's what B mode and tripods are for:




Pentax K20D
S-M-C Takumar 35/2


Last edited by Mike Cash; 03-13-2009 at 06:14 AM.
03-13-2009, 06:05 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by tony13 Quote
I'm not a creative person, really, so I guess that's one of the problems why I can't get good pictures. It also might be because I've only been taking photos for about 9 months now. (beginner)
What should I keep in mind when shooting a photo? I really need advice on this. This is a stupid question, but the answers from pro's will help me in the future, for sure.

My camera is Pentax K100D Super, I'm sure it's a great camera for a beginner, the lens I use is the Sigma 18-125mm 3.5-5.6.
You can start by reading a book on painting or photography and learn about rules of thirds and what-not. Reading about the history of painting and photography could be a good inspiration too.

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
- Ansel Adams
03-13-2009, 06:15 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
Part of "creativity" is working around such environmental limitations.

Very true. I took a workshop where we had the saying that "bad weather makes great pictures". Great pic, btw, Mike.

03-13-2009, 06:16 AM   #20
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Tony, try this book by Scott Kelby. It's a great way for beginners to learn how to control the creative aspects of their photography without getting into all the technical stuff.

Amazon.com: The Digital Photography Book: Scott Kelby: Books

The weekly challenges as mentioned in this thread will also help a lot to get you thinking about 'what' to shoot. This book will help with 'how' to get the shots you want.

Good luck!
03-13-2009, 06:35 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by TaoMaas Quote
Very true. I took a workshop where we had the saying that "bad weather makes great pictures". Great pic, btw, Mike.
Thanks.

The weather is going to be whatever it's going to be, so we may as well take advantage of it and try to work it into the shot.




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03-13-2009, 11:24 AM   #22
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Thanks ya'll for being helpful!
03-13-2009, 11:42 AM   #23
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I think a big part of it as well is to take photos of subjects YOU are interested in. I'm an English teacher, and the best papers my students write are always about subjects they have a passion for. That doesn't mean you can't expand into other things later. I pursued photography initially as a way to record my travels (landscape, etc.) and have expanded into other things. For instance, my wife owns a retired race horse and loves all things "horse." So I've gotten into horse race and rodeo photography a little bit. Which actually brings up another point: see if you can do the "normal" or "cliche" subjects a little differently. There are a gazillion horse race and rodeo pictures out there, but I tried putting my own spin on things:





Another way to be creative is through post-processing. See if you can find a "look" to your photos that you like. It starts with subject and composition, but there are a lot of paths to making those photos "creative."

Todd

03-13-2009, 11:56 AM   #24
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You could also try a 365 project:

a LEGO a day…

The idea is to choose a subject and take a picture that has that subject in it everyday for a year. I'm thinking of doing this just to get myself to open my own creative thought process.
03-13-2009, 01:57 PM   #25
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I really understand the lack of creativity...

I'm a really technically minded person. I am self tought in many technical domains from mechanics to electronics and many other hands on things. I just look at something and instinctively know how it works, how to disassemble it and put it back together again. I'm usually the guy who people ask "how does this work" when they get a new gadget.

The flip side of this is that my "artist" side is practically inexistant. I have very little inspiration. I can take hundreds of photos of something I think may be ok, and in the lot I'll find 2 or 3 where I see something that I like... funny thing is that I show some of the other photos to my friends who are more artsy-minded and they find dozens and dozens of pics they love. Problem is until they point out what they like in the pics, I just don't see what they see.

One thing I started doing is playing with some of my photos in photoshop, cropping here, ajusting exposure there. It actually gives me ideas of what and how I should take pictures. It's obviously the "technical" side of photography, so I am using one of my strong points to try and get creative.

I also spend lot of time in the "Post your pics" forum, and I'll admit many times I just "don't get" some of the pictures. Other times I do get it and am blown away. One users work who just keeps amazing me is Morbo (the Lego a day project).

So worry not, you are not alone! And there is some really good advice in the thread!

Pat
03-13-2009, 02:45 PM   #26
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You know, I found my best creative moments came early in my camera exploits by using a prime lens. This may sound kooky, but I really mean it. Find a nice, fairly inexpensive piece of glass that forces you to move, to practice and to frame things up instead of those push/pull/twist telephoto lenses that allow you to stand still.

I want everyone to know that I am not bashing those telephoto lenses (I own a couple myself), but they may impede the learning process some, at least if you aren't a born natural.

Last edited by alderfall; 03-13-2009 at 02:57 PM.
03-13-2009, 05:25 PM   #27
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Some old WiseMan once said, "The soul of creativity is plagiarism." Think about it. Traditional art training includes, among other things, sitting in front of an artwork and copying it, over and over, until you see how the original was done. Then go on to another work, another style, and repeat many many times. After awhile, the student can develop their own style. Or not. But the basics include mastering the styles and techniques of others.

Photography *can* be like that. Pick one theme, say portraiture. Study how good and 'great' photo portraits have been made. Try to replicate them, including using old technologies. See what styles appeal to you. Copy them. Then you can gin-up your own unique vision, if any. So, learn how to produce acceptable pictures. See what can be done. Then try to do something else. That's creativity.
03-13-2009, 05:33 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by alderfall Quote
You know, I found my best creative moments came early in my camera exploits by using a prime lens. This may sound kooky, but I really mean it. Find a nice, fairly inexpensive piece of glass that forces you to move, to practice and to frame things up instead of those push/pull/twist telephoto lenses that allow you to stand still.

I want everyone to know that I am not bashing those telephoto lenses (I own a couple myself), but they may impede the learning process some, at least if you aren't a born natural.
Agree, when you lose the practicality of a zoom lens, you begin to think: "oh, how can I make this look interesting in another way than zooming?".
03-13-2009, 05:44 PM   #29
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One of the best ways to improve your photography is to work out what is wrong with the pictures you are taking. If you know what is wrong with a picture it is relatively easy to work how to take a much improved version of the very same scene, post photos in the Post Your Photos forum and request input.
Post comments about other members pictures as well and read what others say, you'll be teaching yourself composition at the same time.
All of us took bad pictures to start with and many of us still do on occasion but at the same time all of us who are active on the forum are learning from each other.
03-13-2009, 06:32 PM   #30
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Creativity...

...How many of us could look at an old bike and see in the handle bars and the seat a bulls head?

In art the whole is always greater than the sum of the parts...

Last edited by wildman; 03-25-2009 at 02:36 AM.
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