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03-24-2009, 01:44 AM   #16
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Shouldn't take anywhere near a minute. I do it in far less than that even with screwmount lenses. Here's how I do it:

1. New lens in right hand, spin off cap, hold lens with three fingers, hold cap with thumb and index fingers.

2. Spin old lens off camera, hold in left hand, place cap lightly on old lens, switch to right hand (two lenses in right hand), screw on rear cap, place lens in pocket.

3. Attach new lens.

4. Adjust SR.

5. Attach new lens

I'm left-handed, so adjust accordingly if you're more comfortable doing stuff right-handed. I typically use nothing but a loose wrist strap and will usually let the camera dangle freely if necessary. It also helps if you're not overly anal about dust.

03-24-2009, 02:45 AM   #17
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That is a really good question that makes seasoned photographers stop and think for a minute and break the process down into a few understandable points.

Lots of good advise here, especially about practicing at home when you are not feeling rushed. Develop a system that you are comfortable with using the bag you normally carry around.

When I change lenses I try to find a place to sit or if squatting down I move away from pedestrian traffic; people often don't look down when they are walking and my bump into you. Also, if with a friend or family member I am not shy to ask them to hold a lens whilst I do the switch-a-roo. Also, the other person can keep an eye open for unforeseen situations while you are concentrating on the camera and lenses. (Or maybe I'm just a bit overly cautious in unfamiliar or crowed places.)

I agree that a minute should be ample time to do the switch, but practice.
03-24-2009, 03:05 AM   #18
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One ancillary point, if I may.....

I'm operating under the assumption that the question has mostly to do with prime lenses, since the whole point of a zoom is to minimize the need to change lenses in order to change focal lengths.

An important skill to develop is to try to foresee what length might be most useful before the need arises and to already be changed out, if possible. When in doubt, go a bit on the wide side, since it is usually possible to crop later if necessary.
03-24-2009, 04:00 AM   #19
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I got one of those swing shoulder bags that you can swing from the backpack position to hanging in front of your chest. I then open up the flap, prepare the lens I want to use by taking off the end cap and positioning it for a quick grab. I then proceed to take the mounted lens off with the camera almost in the upper compartment of the bag and my back to the wind (camera is hanging from the neckstrap). First thing is leave the lens I just unmounted lying securely in the bag without wasting time with the endcaps. Then mount the prepared lens and finsish off by putting the endcap on the unmounted lens. Secure the unmounted lens in its proper nook in the bag, zip up the bag and swing it back to backpack position.

All of this takes no more than 60 seconds. In environments where I need to change lenses more frequently I just leave the bag in the fron position. (it is a great support for the elbows too, adding for stability of shooting.

04-27-2009, 10:03 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by navcom Quote
I say whatever method works best for you is the best. I usually have the luxury to plan ahead for the lens I will need. Most of my shooting is outdoor landscapes and I rarely go into the field without a master plan of attack on my photo composition...I have the basic picture in mind before I show up. If I think I will be in a situation that may require two different types of lenses with little time to change, I bring along a second body and have my backup lens ready to go on that camera.

As far as the actual routine for changing out a lens, the only advice I can give is NEVER change your lens around a molting cockatiel! I did this ONCE by accident near our little feathered house pet and it totally messed up my K20D sensor. Little feather dust has oil on it and they stick like glue to a sensor. Even my rocket blower couldn't tackle it.

And I was out of sensor swabs! Had to wait several days for a new box to arrive!
What kind of sensor swabs do you use and were to purchase?
04-27-2009, 10:30 PM   #21
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Wouldn't it be nice to have one use disposable lenses.
04-27-2009, 10:40 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Damn Brit Quote
Wouldn't it be nice to have one use disposable lenses.
How about recycleable lense?
04-28-2009, 05:47 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by res3567 Quote
What kind of sensor swabs do you use and were to purchase?
I use wet and dry swabs. Here is a link to the ones I use...

GCSC40703 Green Clean Wet Foam and Dry Sweeper Non Full Frame Sensor Cleaners, Three 2 Packs, Total of 6

One thing to know...most brick-and-mortar stores do not carry sensor swabs. There are two reasons. 1) They want you to pay to have them do it, and 2) liability.

While it's not that hard to clean a sensor, do use caution and care. Always try to use a rocket blower first and swabs as a last resort. I was a bit squeamish the first time not knowing what to expect...especially with all the "warnings" out there that you shouldn't do it yourself. Hogwash. It's not that big a deal if you just prepare for it, take your time, and be gentle. Piece of cake.

04-28-2009, 05:48 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Damn Brit Quote
Wouldn't it be nice to have one use disposable lenses.
Good heavens Gary! You've opened up a whole new evil world for those of us with LBA!
04-28-2009, 07:18 AM   #25
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I was watching an actual photojournalist running down the street while he changed lenses. He had the second lens in a large pocket with no caps front or back. He got the old lens off and stashed it in a pocket. He pulled out the large white telephoto, fumbled it, it dropped, as he ran he managed to kick it as it fell and shoot it twenty feet down the street where it bounced along the cobblestones.

I go to the other extreme and am quite cautious changing lenses. Hey, I'm not getting paid and I'm cheap.
04-28-2009, 07:46 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by patrickt Quote
....He pulled out the large white telephoto, fumbled it, it dropped, as he ran he managed to kick it as it fell and shoot it twenty feet down the street where it bounced along the cobblestones.....


Just thinking about having this happen gives me an anxiety attack!

I'm thinking the lens ended up on Ebay.
04-28-2009, 08:14 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by patrickt Quote
I was watching an actual photojournalist running down the street while he changed lenses. He had the second lens in a large pocket with no caps front or back. He got the old lens off and stashed it in a pocket. He pulled out the large white telephoto, fumbled it, it dropped, as he ran he managed to kick it as it fell and shoot it twenty feet down the street where it bounced along the cobblestones.

I go to the other extreme and am quite cautious changing lenses. Hey, I'm not getting paid and I'm cheap.
In a similar vein, I watched a photographer for the local paper change the lens on her Nikon and was amazed that she transports 'em around uncapped. She just removed the first with one hand, popped it in her sling bag, brought out the other, fitted it and zipped the bag closed... elapsed time - about 10 seconds. I was impressed! (and the I heard how fast 9FPS is OMFG! )
05-06-2009, 07:02 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by heliphoto Quote
In a similar vein, I watched a photographer for the local paper change the lens on her Nikon and was amazed that she transports 'em around uncapped. She just removed the first with one hand, popped it in her sling bag, brought out the other, fitted it and zipped the bag closed... elapsed time - about 10 seconds. I was impressed! (and the I heard how fast 9FPS is OMFG! )
So it should be ok to carry lenses like that?

Uncapped front and back?

That is what hampers me from time to time.
05-06-2009, 02:16 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by res3567 Quote
So it should be ok to carry lenses like that?

Uncapped front and back?

That is what hampers me from time to time.
I don't know - it doesn't seem ok to me, but when I worked on skis for a living, I was known to ski across some mud or pine needles etc. that were in my way - even if it meant new scratches to the bases of my skis. I think being a pro in an field will let you abuse your equipment to an extent which you just can't fathom when you're an amateur. It's also possible that the newspaper owns the lenses and she just uses 'em.

Myself? I'll just keep 'em capped, and accept a slower change when necessary.
05-06-2009, 05:17 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by heliphoto Quote
I don't know - it doesn't seem ok to me, but when I worked on skis for a living, I was known to ski across some mud or pine needles etc. that were in my way - even if it meant new scratches to the bases of my skis. I think being a pro in an field will let you abuse your equipment to an extent which you just can't fathom when you're an amateur. It's also possible that the newspaper owns the lenses and she just uses 'em.

Myself? I'll just keep 'em capped, and accept a slower change when necessary.
I tend to agree
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