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03-21-2010, 10:15 AM   #46
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There are only two rings on it, the focusing ring, and the aperture ring. There are no buttons or switches. The lens aperture works perfectly normally both off of the camera, and on the k1000.

04-02-2010, 04:06 PM   #47
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Can Pentax-A lens do auto-exposure?

My Pentax-M 50mm is full-manual (as expected): manual focus, manual exposure, manual aperture.
How about Pentax-A lens? Specifically, -A lens on dSLR (K-x in my case)?

Thanks.
04-03-2010, 09:39 AM   #48
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As long as you have the aperture ring in the "A" position, then all exposure modes and flash automation modes are fully available.
04-04-2010, 09:11 AM   #49
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Thanks Marc!

As always.

04-04-2010, 12:50 PM   #50
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I've been playing around with my 50mm f/1.4 M42 lens on my K-x in manual mode. It's been fun finding the right SS, ISO, and aperture settings to use for the right exposure in various indoor lighting. However, since I see no meter, is there a way to have a better idea of what exposure you're going to get before taking the picture? Or is there a way to get metering? Or is it just something that takes mileage getting use to which setting work with which lighting?

Thanks in advance.
04-04-2010, 01:35 PM   #51
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QuoteOriginally posted by Perrumpo Quote
I've been playing around with my 50mm f/1.4 M42 lens on my K-x in manual mode. It's been fun finding the right SS, ISO, and aperture settings to use for the right exposure in various indoor lighting. However, since I see no meter, is there a way to have a better idea of what exposure you're going to get before taking the picture? Or is there a way to get metering? Or is it just something that takes mileage getting use to which setting work with which lighting?

Thanks in advance.
Sure you have metering. And there are a bunch of ways to accomplish the same thing.

If you're in full manual, on the bottom right of your viewfinder there's a little +/- and status bar. As you change aperture on the lens barrel, or shutter and ISO via the dials, that display changes.

I use the Green button technique and not that because I find it easier, but it gets me to the same place.
04-04-2010, 01:42 PM   #52
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
Sure you have metering. And there are a bunch of ways to accomplish the same thing.

If you're in full manual, on the bottom right of your viewfinder there's a little +/- and status bar. As you change aperture on the lens barrel, or shutter and ISO via the dials, that display changes.

I use the Green button technique and not that because I find it easier, but it gets me to the same place.
Yes, but the meter displays nothing when I put the manual lens on. Have I forgotten a setting?
04-04-2010, 01:52 PM   #53
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QuoteOriginally posted by Perrumpo Quote
Yes, but the meter displays nothing when I put the manual lens on. Have I forgotten a setting?
No--you're right. I realized my error after I posted that. I was thinking about a different kind of lens.

For me, I pretty much know what my ISO is going to be. That's not something I play with unless I'm not happy with what I'm getting from my shutter speed, because for static shooting, I want the APERTURE I want--so as long as the speed is fast enough to handhold, I don't change the ISO.

The green button for me gets me to the same place as aperture priority or full manual. My ISO is fixed, my aperture is fixed, and the green button just locks in the shutter speed. For bracketing, I would close the lens down a stop, hit the green button, open it back up that stop, pull the trigger, and it would give me that one stop over image.

04-04-2010, 02:05 PM   #54
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
No--you're right. I realized my error after I posted that. I was thinking about a different kind of lens.

For me, I pretty much know what my ISO is going to be. That's not something I play with unless I'm not happy with what I'm getting from my shutter speed, because for static shooting, I want the APERTURE I want--so as long as the speed is fast enough to handhold, I don't change the ISO.

The green button for me gets me to the same place as aperture priority or full manual. My ISO is fixed, my aperture is fixed, and the green button just locks in the shutter speed. For bracketing, I would close the lens down a stop, hit the green button, open it back up that stop, pull the trigger, and it would give me that one stop over image.
Okay. I did already have the Green Button set for that from another post of yours, but I wasn't clear on how to use it. Now I get it. Good technique. It's working out fine for static objects. I'll probably just use my kit lens for the family gathering today since I'll want to quickly catch certain moments with the kiddies. AF is handy for that, anyway

Thanks, Ira!
04-04-2010, 02:17 PM   #55
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QuoteOriginally posted by Perrumpo Quote
Okay. I did already have the Green Button set for that from another post of yours, but I wasn't clear on how to use it. Now I get it. Good technique. It's working out fine for static objects. I'll probably just use my kit lens for the family gathering today since I'll want to quickly catch certain moments with the kiddies. AF is handy for that, anyway

Thanks, Ira!
I have to shoot a cancer fundraiser this Friday at a restaurant as a favor for a friend (okay, it's a bar too), and I'll be using my full auto 18-55 kit and 90 Tamron as well--so I know where you're coming from.

We simply don't have the time to play with it on the off-chance we'll get it right--but that's the part I love best about these manual lenses. PLAYING! However, there ARE people here with the skills to actually do this stuff in full manual, and they make me sick.

For example, we eat Easter Dinner late, and the prime rib comes out of the oven at 6:30 (EST). So, with an hour to go and still heavy sun in south Florida this time of the day, I'm going to take a walk now with my 135 SuperTak with polarizer. I've had a bunch of lenses for SLR work that I haven't used in AGES, and since I just got the KX, I'm separating the men from the boys.

For example, I am NOT happy at all yet with my Super Tak 105, but this 135, which I shot for the first time this week, is blowing me away.

This manual glass is an adventure. And while the kit lenses are capable of outstanding things, I simply like the experience and more work involved of full manual.
04-04-2010, 02:22 PM   #56
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QuoteOriginally posted by Perrumpo Quote
It's working out fine for static objects.
Just another quick note:

If you're in your living room shooting the kids running around, don't assume you have to keep re-metering. You're working under static light--I don't think clouds roll through living rooms in Maryland--so you would be surprised how you can get a base meter reading, keep it on that, and just worry about focusing.

So I would give this a try once, using high ISO and no flash.
04-04-2010, 06:08 PM   #57
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Thanks

Thanks for taking the time to put together your guide. It has answered many questions.
04-04-2010, 10:23 PM   #58
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
Just another quick note:

If you're in your living room shooting the kids running around, don't assume you have to keep re-metering. You're working under static light--I don't think clouds roll through living rooms in Maryland--so you would be surprised how you can get a base meter reading, keep it on that, and just worry about focusing.

So I would give this a try once, using high ISO and no flash.
True, that might have worked at my grandparents' tonight. However, in my apt, there is no overhead lighting, just a lamp in a corner here and there, and so the lighting changes in each direction, which was evidenced by my playing around today at home shooting the cat.

I have to say, though, that I am utterly fascinated by the ability of a lens to turn dim, yellow, indoor lighting at night into a photograph that looks as though it was taken during full daylight inside... all without a flash.

As an engineering student, photography is proving to be increasingly intriguing. Yes, photography is an art, but I did not anticipate just how intricate of a science it is as well.
04-05-2010, 09:17 AM   #59
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QuoteOriginally posted by Perrumpo Quote
Yes, but the meter displays nothing when I put the manual lens on. Have I forgotten a setting?
No, but you can get the meter to display by doing an (optical) DOF preview, which stops down the lens as long as you hold the button.
04-14-2010, 10:20 AM   #60
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One Thing to be aware of is switching between a older lens and a DA* lens, I did this on my K10D and the Aperture block in the camera died. Atleast that's what they told me after I payed $300 to have it fixed.
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