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07-21-2009, 09:27 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by mischivo Quote
Protection from what, UV rays?
Smoke, debris, sand, sharp points, hands?

07-21-2009, 09:34 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by CWyatt Quote
Smoke, debris, sand, sharp points, hands?
I wrote this on another forum:

Don't buy into the industry's claims of protection. Your lens is perfectly good without a UV filter. The only objects capable of scratching a lens' front element are those harder than the glass, of which there aren't many that your lens should ever be touching. Some of these include: sand, diamonds, quartz, and perhaps carbon-edged knifes. Sand won't scratch your lens unless you're careless enough to not notice sand particles on the element and commence with vigourous cleaning with a cloth (or you drop your lens into sand and twirl it...). To prevent this, blow the lens if you suspect any such particles are on it, and shake the cloth before using it to clean the lens. However, if you're worried about dropping your lens and think the filter will protect it, think again. If your lens falls onto something like a diamond or sharp granite, the object will break through the filter and get to the lens anyway; however, if you drop your lens onto something less hard than glass, your filter makes your lens more liable to being scratched than it would without the filter. Remember, anything of equal or greater hardness can scratch your lens, and UV filters are made from glass. If your lens falls onto something less hard than glass and shatters the filter, all those filter shards can now scratch your objective end quite efficiently. Without the filter, your lens would survive if the impact is not strong enough to break the objective element.
I hope my argument is convincing. UV filters are sold to gullible consumers by pushy sales representatives. Save your money and don't buy it, unless you want the effect of reducing UV light. Funny enough, I've only seen the visual effect of reducing UV/haze in marketing example photos (which are frequently the same photo: one processed to look like crap, the other processed to have more contrast and vibrant colours), never in real life photos--odd isn't it? If you want a filter that may actually be useful, save money for a quality polarizer, and buy it cheap from a place like Maxsaver.net.
07-21-2009, 09:48 PM   #18
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While I think that the majority of people who buy and use UV/protective filters never have much use for them, they can be useful.

A lens hood will be better protection in falls. But apart from scratching, which is, as you point out, not terribly likely with good cleaning, smoke or sticky substances can be hazardous. Filters also make it easy to wipe off water quickly without worrying too much about scratching or wiping dirt on the lens.

In certain environments they'd be great to have. In the documentary War Photographer I didn't see James Nachtwey take a photo without a UV filter. If I remember right he was in tear gas, smoke, around broken glass, debris, knives, in sulfur mines, and riding on scooters with his cameras.
07-21-2009, 10:14 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by CWyatt Quote
While I think that the majority of people who buy and use UV/protective filters never have much use for them, they can be useful.

A lens hood will be better protection in falls. But apart from scratching, which is, as you point out, not terribly likely with good cleaning, smoke or sticky substances can be hazardous. Filters also make it easy to wipe off water quickly without worrying too much about scratching or wiping dirt on the lens.

In certain environments they'd be great to have. In the documentary War Photographer I didn't see James Nachtwey take a photo without a UV filter. If I remember right he was in tear gas, smoke, around broken glass, debris, knives, in sulfur mines, and riding on scooters with his cameras.
Glass is not reactive to smoke. It forms a film on top, which is easily rubbed off with the proper cloth and or liquid solution.

Regarding the documentary. My quick research says it was filmed in 2001. This is the nascence of digital, and anyone doing serious work used film. From a few clips of the movie that I just saw, all photographs were monochrome. So my question to you is this: what leads you to believe he's using UV filters and not yellow/orange/red filters? Was it clear in the movie that he was? Should it matter? Perhaps the guy was also conned into it when he was starting out and simply never changed his ways. My point is, most of the elements that people try to protect their lenses from with a UV filter are not something their lenses require protection from. Drop your lens onto a rock and it won't help. Have a knife stab your lens? Won't help. Drop your camera from a scooter? Say goodbye to the whole package.

Smoke, dirt, grime, grease, honey, blood, sap, etc? You're going to end up wiping it off the filter just the same as off the lens.

I've made my argument and it's up to anyone in the process of being conned to make up their mind. I believe my reasoning is sound. If prospective buyers don't, well, I'm not about to feel bad about their waste of money.

07-21-2009, 11:54 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by mischivo Quote
I wrote this on another forum:

Don't buy into the industry's claims of protection. Your lens is perfectly good without a UV filter. The only objects capable of scratching a lens' front element are those harder than the glass, of which there aren't many that your lens should ever be touching. Some of these include: sand, diamonds, quartz, and perhaps carbon-edged knifes.
What about the lens coating though, is it as hard/scratch-resistant as glass?

Scratched coating looks ugly enough!!
07-22-2009, 12:00 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kguru Quote
What about the lens coating though, is it as hard/scratch-resistant as glass?

Scratched coating looks ugly enough!!
If the coating is less hard than glass (and I'll admit it probably is, but still not less hard than most objects your lens could come into contact with). You should find out what this SMC stuff is made off. If it's easily scratched, perhaps it's not so Super...
07-22-2009, 12:20 AM   #22
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QuoteQuote:
From a few clips of the movie that I just saw, all photographs were monochrome. So my question to you is this: what leads you to believe he's using UV filters and not yellow/orange/red filters?
In the film it shows his camera quite a lot. The camera is a film Canon and the filter is always clear UV. Interestingly, without a lens hood. Not sure on the reason for the no hood, maybe people he is photographing find it less threatening without one. Anyway, I read a few articles that discuss the film, Nachtwey and his photography that note the UV filter.

Last edited by CWyatt; 07-22-2009 at 01:46 AM.
07-22-2009, 12:29 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by mischivo Quote
If the coating is less hard than glass (and I'll admit it probably is, but still not less hard than most objects your lens could come into contact with). You should find out what this SMC stuff is made off. If it's easily scratched, perhaps it's not so Super...
Although most inadvertent contacts don't cause scratches it's the subsequent cleaning that potentially does. That's what people try to protect: inadvertent fingerprints & dust on the front lens coating. Your theory is debunked

07-22-2009, 04:36 AM   #24
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I know it is a never ending debate but this is my experience: I gave up trying to clean my Hoya multicoated UV filter. Off it went and guess what: my pictures are sharper now!!!

Thanks,
07-22-2009, 06:39 AM   #25
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Cleaning should not cause scratches unless someone is being utterly negligent. Here are simple instructions:
1. Make sure there are no sandy particles on your lens. Give it a quick blow to make certain.
2. Take a clean cloth, shake it vigourously to remove any sandy particles it may have, and wipe the lens.

At most, this should take ten seconds. Not a single scratched lens yet. I knocked on wood.
07-22-2009, 08:21 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by mischivo Quote
Cleaning should not cause scratches unless someone is being utterly negligent. Here are simple instructions:
1. Make sure there are no sandy particles on your lens. Give it a quick blow to make certain.
2. Take a clean cloth, shake it vigourously to remove any sandy particles it may have, and wipe the lens.

At most, this should take ten seconds. Not a single scratched lens yet. I knocked on wood.
you should also inform these people that you have no problem taking your filter-less L glass to the beach, rocky boats, and shooting out the window of moving vehicles...

UV Filters are a waste of money... i cant find that picture where i smashed like 50 of them... maybe when i get home

the left over cylinders are good for home-made lens hoods though
07-22-2009, 09:17 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gooshin Quote
you should also inform these people that you have no problem taking your filter-less L glass to the beach, rocky boats, and shooting out the window of moving vehicles...

UV Filters are a waste of money... i cant find that picture where i smashed like 50 of them... maybe when i get home

the left over cylinders are good for home-made lens hoods though
Oh yeah, I remember those filters! The Henry's outlet has a zillion such filter tubes in a big box near the back where Paul works. I picked one up on and looked through it: it's like a foggy ND filter.
07-22-2009, 01:34 PM   #28
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So guys what would you recommend to clean the lense? are special cleaning liquids a choice here if yes which ones should i pick? i really need one i got some crap on my lense!
07-22-2009, 04:22 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by acarpov Quote
So guys what would you recommend to clean the lense? are special cleaning liquids a choice here if yes which ones should i pick? i really need one i got some crap on my lense!
I thought I was being clear above. Here we go:
1. You need a lens that you feel requires cleansing.
2. You need any microfibre cloth.
3. (optional) Breath onto the lens immediately before cleaning (for stuck on dirt).

However, because I've already suggested you waste money on a B+W UV filter, you should also purchase a premium Louis Vuitton micröfibré cloth.
07-22-2009, 06:32 PM   #30
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you know i have a feeling admin made a mistake naming this category beginner's corner , should have named it angerly sarcastic beginner's corner
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