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01-25-2013, 06:55 PM   #16
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Bumped because of some current interest.

02-06-2013, 10:59 AM   #17
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Tripod is a must. On bright days a ND filter will help step down to allow longer shutter.
02-06-2013, 11:32 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by no694terry Quote
Tripod is a must. On bright days a ND filter will help step down to allow longer shutter.
My tip: indoor waterfall! It had a convenient bridge to brace the camera too. I didn't need a tripod or ND filter.


02-06-2013, 12:03 PM   #19
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Stopping down, ND filters and a tripod are the best tips you're going to get...

If you need basic info on how NDs (and a host of other filters) work then I recommend CambridgeInColour as being a pretty good resource...

02-06-2013, 12:35 PM   #20
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I usually use an ND if I can't get the shutter speed down as slow as I want. I've found that I can get silky water with shutter speeds as fast as 1/10 of a second, but around 1 second seems ideal.

Now, for my own use, once I go to an ND (and I occasionally stack 2), I will often go back to trying to use the ideal aperture of the lens (f5.6 - f.11) and work from there if possible.

What I wonder is whether anyone has opinions with respect to the quality of an image shot at say f22 or f32 (subject to some quality issues at such high f-stops) vs. the possible loss of quality of having additional glass (i.e. an ND or 2 ND's) in front of the lens. My own experience has generally been that using an ND is better than stopping down to f-22 or more, but I suppose camera, lens, and filter quality will affect the final result.
02-06-2013, 01:25 PM   #21
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I'm trying to start a waterfall collection here of around my area, the info botton on the right will show you the basic camera settings. I like 1 to 2 seconds, vary on that depending on how much water is flowing. Theres one in there shot at F32, i didnt know any better at the time, i just though the higher the F the larger the focus, now i know that only goes so far before losing IQ

Waterfalls - Terry Tumulty's Photos | SmugMug
02-06-2013, 01:41 PM   #22
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Going back to the image quality thing. I've had instances where I've shot f32, and the shots haven't ever been horrible. Sure, they are lower quality than what I could get at f8, but I've always managed to make a decent shot out of them. The quality is still often better than what I was getting out of a p&s camera before I had a dSLR. In some cases, they are quite satisfactory. I'm sure if I printed a poster the quality difference may become obvious, but it often depends on the subject of the shot and the expectations you have for what you are shooting. With waterfalls that we are trying to soften, f22 or 32 isn't going to be too bad unless you are looking for details in items such as surround vegetation and rocks.
02-06-2013, 02:17 PM   #23
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With this kind of image, diffraction softening from using a very small aperture may not be a bad thing. A lack of sharp detail on the leaves and rocks may be acceptable. The softness probably helps with the dreamy theme from the silky water.

Dan.

02-06-2013, 02:51 PM   #24
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Probably, of more importance, is the time of day. I like starting pre-dawn. If you shoot from pre-dawn through sunrise for say 1 hr, even with a ND filter, you will notice the quality of the light changing as well as the quantity. Very early or very late light is softer, as are shadows, and it looks more interesting than normal daytime sunlight, which is too harsh, unless you live in a often overcast part of the world.

I suggest going to Twilight Calculator - "Blue Hour / Golden Hour Table" | JeKoPhoto - Jens Kossmagk Photography | Event-, Natur- and Sport-Photos

Print out the user manual at that site – has a lot of interesting stuff – then create a table for your area.

My first attempts from 2008:
https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/post-your-photos/39592-brisbane-botanic-g...ter-shots.html

And 2010 with an ND8 filter:
https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/post-your-photos/120338-landscape-3-falling-water-shots.html

In particular, in the 2010 shots, earlier was better.

Dan.

Last edited by dosdan; 02-06-2013 at 02:57 PM.
02-06-2013, 03:35 PM   #25
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Time of day is often valuable although I find hard to control. I often find myself hiking a long distance to waterfalls only to need a long hike back that the timing isn't always as easy to control as I'd hope. Hopefully, as life goes on, time will be less precious and I can work at these evening or early morning shots. The nice thing at that time of day, when I've been able to, is that the ND is less critical.
02-06-2013, 04:28 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by emalvick Quote
...What I wonder is whether anyone has opinions with respect to the quality of an image shot at say f22 or f32 (subject to some quality issues at such high f-stops) vs. the possible loss of quality of having additional glass (i.e. an ND or 2 ND's) in front of the lens. My own experience has generally been that using an ND is better than stopping down to f-22 or more, but I suppose camera, lens, and filter quality will affect the final result.
I think this would be easy to test if you're already using a tripod. Just take one shot with the ND, one without and stopped down, maybe a third without the flowing water effect and an f8-11 aperture. Try and get a similar histogram each time. Then see what you get.
02-06-2013, 05:06 PM   #27
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and keep ISO at 100
02-06-2013, 08:22 PM   #28
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-K5..................ISO 80
-35mm f2.4.....F10
-ND10.............1 sec.
-Photomatix...tone-mapping
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02-07-2013, 11:46 AM   #29
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just hike out before dark, put the camera on a tripod, and use the 3 second timer. put it on auto mode if you wish. should give you the effect you want, depending on the amount of light (you can take a shot every minute if you wish then throw out the ones you don't want). One important thing....don't forget the flashlight for the hike back
at least 1 second shutter is required.
have fun with it
BTW, a rock or ground can substatute for a tripod if needed
cheers

randy
02-07-2013, 12:34 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by slip Quote
just hike out before dark, put the camera on a tripod, and use the 3 second timer. put it on auto mode if you wish. should give you the effect you want, depending on the amount of light (you can take a shot every minute if you wish then throw out the ones you don't want). One important thing....don't forget the flashlight for the hike back
at least 1 second shutter is required.

randy
ah yes, I forgot to mention the 2 sec timer (aka Mirror Up lock) to prevent camera shake on the tripod. another very useful tip. Also when using tripod, turn off the SR
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