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12-05-2009, 11:50 PM   #1
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SLR lense on DSLR

I have been thinking of buying a Pentax DSLR and have been given an MZ50 with 2 sigma lenses 28-80 and 100-300.

Will they work on Pentax DSLR's?

I have heard different stories.


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Michael

12-06-2009, 12:09 AM   #2
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Yes, they can!
12-06-2009, 03:13 PM   #3
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Just got a Pentax Kx, and love it. The fact that I could use my old K1000 lenses was one of the issue for me! after setting the camera up. I have tried 5 of my old lenses, and they work great!!!
12-06-2009, 06:04 PM   #4
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If it uses a K-mount then it will fit. If it uses a M42 then an adapter is needed. Got to love Pentax.

12-06-2009, 07:11 PM   #5
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Yes - Get a K-x. Your 28-80mm starts at a "normal" perspective and goes to a short telephoto, and has a macro mode, if it is the one I have seen. A fun lens to learn on. The 100-300mm would be good to use to learn about telephoto photography. If you can't afford a K-X get what you can afford.
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12-06-2009, 07:39 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by oconnmmj Quote
I have been thinking of buying a Pentax DSLR and have been given an MZ50 with 2 sigma lenses 28-80 and 100-300.

Will they work on Pentax DSLR's?

I have heard different stories.


Thanks
Michael
Pentax lilkes to claim that any Pentax 35mm SLR lens ever made will work on a current Pentax dslr. With a few caveats, that is true.

Old, Spotmatic-era, screwmount lenses require an inexpensive adapter to fit on the k-mount dslrs. They work in stop-down metering mode. Of course, they do not become autofocus lenses.

The first generation k-mount lenses will fit without an adapter. However, since they have no electrical contacts, and the camera lacks the mechanism to know what aperture is selected on the lens, they, too, work only in stop-down metering mode. In fact, these are probably even more cumbersome to use than the screwmount lenses. This includes the M-series lenses from the MX, ME, et al, era.

The A-series lenses, of the Program Plus era, will work in all metering modes, but, of course, must still be manually focused. These can be easily recognized by the presence of the "A" setting on the aperture ring.

Finally, the autofocus lenses designed to work with the last generation of film cameras, such as your MZ-50, will work exactly as they did on your film camera. All metering modes work as designed, and the autofocus works exactly as it did on the film cameras.

I have a K10D and the Tamron 28-200mm AF lens I used on my SF-1 and ZX-60 works beautifully on the dslr.

Note that, because the digital sensor is smaller than a 35mm frame, the field of view of your lenses will change. Some people confuse this and believe that the focal length changes, but it does not. A 50mm lens on a dslr will have the same field of view as a 75mm lens on a film slr. A 200mm lens on a dslr has the same field of view as a 300mm lens on a film slr. That means that your 28mm zoom is now only a very mild wide angle. The equivalent field of view on a dslr requires about an 18mm lens, which, not coincidentally, is the low end of the zoom range on the kit lenses (18-55mm). This is referred to as the "crop factor".
12-06-2009, 09:46 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by noblepa Quote
Pentax lilkes to claim that any Pentax 35mm SLR lens ever made will work on a current Pentax dslr. With a few caveats, that is true.

Old, Spotmatic-era, screwmount lenses require an inexpensive adapter to fit on the k-mount dslrs. They work in stop-down metering mode. Of course, they do not become autofocus lenses.

The first generation k-mount lenses will fit without an adapter. However, since they have no electrical contacts, and the camera lacks the mechanism to know what aperture is selected on the lens, they, too, work only in stop-down metering mode. In fact, these are probably even more cumbersome to use than the screwmount lenses.
I find them to be as easy, if not easier to use than the screw mount lenses. The change is to set the f/stop and (depending on your camera model) press the green button. This will stop down the lens and set the appropriate shutter speed, without the necessity of peering through a dark viewfinder to focus, or switching the M42 lens to A to focus and back to M to shoot and meter. In both cases with the k10 and k20, there can be metering errors. At the top of the Beginner's forum there is a sticky with elaborate detail on the use of non-automatic lenses.
QuoteQuote:
This includes the M-series lenses from the MX, ME, et al, era.

The A-series lenses, of the Program Plus era, will work in all metering modes, but, of course, must still be manually focused. These can be easily recognized by the presence of the "A" setting on the aperture ring.

Finally, the autofocus lenses designed to work with the last generation of film cameras, such as your MZ-50, will work exactly as they did on your film camera. All metering modes work as designed, and the autofocus works exactly as it did on the film cameras.

I have a K10D and the Tamron 28-200mm AF lens I used on my SF-1 and ZX-60 works beautifully on the dslr.

Note that, because the digital sensor is smaller than a 35mm frame, the field of view of your lenses will change. Some people confuse this and believe that the focal length changes, but it does not. A 50mm lens on a dslr will have the same field of view as a 75mm lens on a film slr. A 200mm lens on a dslr has the same field of view as a 300mm lens on a film slr. That means that your 28mm zoom is now only a very mild wide angle. The equivalent field of view on a dslr requires about an 18mm lens, which, not coincidentally, is the low end of the zoom range on the kit lenses (18-55mm). This is referred to as the "crop factor".
12-07-2009, 08:13 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
I find them to be as easy, if not easier to use than the screw mount lenses. The change is to set the f/stop and (depending on your camera model) press the green button. This will stop down the lens and set the appropriate shutter speed, without the necessity of peering through a dark viewfinder to focus, or switching the M42 lens to A to focus and back to M to shoot and meter. In both cases with the k10 and k20, there can be metering errors. At the top of the Beginner's forum there is a sticky with elaborate detail on the use of non-automatic lenses.
To be honest, I don't have any first-generation k-mount lenses. I do have a couple of screwmount lenses that I like to use with my K10D. With the screwmount lenses, I simply set the lens in manual mode, the camera in Av mode and fire away. I had my K10D for almost six months before I learned what the green button was for. It is unnecessary for screwmount lenses.

I leave the lens in M mode and turn the aperture ring to open/close the lens. I learned photography on a Spotmatic, so this is second-nature to me. No focusing in a dark VF. I treat the lens as completely manual; wide-open to focus, then stop-down to shoot. Since I often change the aperture for nearly every shot, this is not a problem.

Forgive me if I misspoke about using k-mount lenses. I was relaying what I have read on the web. I didn't mean to give the impression that k-mount lenses were unusable on a dslr. I was merely trying to give a brief explanation of the four basic generations of Pentax lenses and how they differ in their operation on a dslr.

I was trying to make the point that Pentax probably has the best backward compatibility in the industry. My brother has a Nikon D200 and has been a Nikon user since his first Nikon F. Unfortunately, the lenses from his F can't even be mounted on the D200, without sending them away to have some obstacle machined off, at $50 per lens. Even many of their newer lenses won't meter or AF properly (if at all) on dslr bodies.

12-07-2009, 09:35 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by noblepa Quote
I leave the lens in M mode and turn the aperture ring to open/close the lens. I learned photography on a Spotmatic, so this is second-nature to me. No focusing in a dark VF. I treat the lens as completely manual; wide-open to focus, then stop-down to shoot. Since I often change the aperture for nearly every shot, this is not a problem.

Forgive me if I misspoke about using k-mount lenses. I was relaying what I have read on the web. I didn't mean to give the impression that k-mount lenses were unusable on a dslr. I was merely trying to give a brief explanation of the four basic generations of Pentax lenses and how they differ in their operation on a dslr.

I was trying to make the point that Pentax probably has the best backward compatibility in the industry. My brother has a Nikon D200 and has been a Nikon user since his first Nikon F. Unfortunately, the lenses from his F can't even be mounted on the D200, without sending them away to have some obstacle machined off, at $50 per lens. Even many of their newer lenses won't meter or AF properly (if at all) on dslr bodies.
You make your point very well, indeed. I was attempting to point out a method of using the K lenses that does not require jumping through too many hoops. I am sorry if my post sounded harsh.

Basically, the compatibility of old lenses on Pentax D SLR bodies is a wonder to behold. You can even mount Asahiflex lenses, with a M42 - M39 adapter inside the K - M42 adaptor, or use 645 and 67 lenses on your K-X with the appropriate adaptors.
12-07-2009, 06:36 PM   #10
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Most of them has already answered your query albeit not very warm replies so..here is the only one lacking "welcome to the forums oconnmmj"!
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