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01-08-2010, 01:18 PM   #16
Ash
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It's convenience in a nutshell.
Instant metering in M mode rather than having to switch camera modes just to meter a scene you would like to adjust settings to. Of course with metering in mind you could conceivably use hyper-P mode and make one of the adjustments there, but M mode is that much more flexible... meter and adjust the part of the triad you want.

01-08-2010, 01:19 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Damn Brit Quote
When I'm working with a tripod or just taking my time I use the dials. I find that it allows me to check composition and elements in the frame at the same time, so in that respect, I don't think any time is wasted. I used to use the green button like you do but I think my photography has benefited by slowing it down.

Yeah ... that is more like my technique when taking long shutter speed shots with a tripod. The Green button would seem not as useful under such conditions.

Now, if it's a case of take the shot or miss it, I'll use the green button.
That is where I can see this magic button do its work.

@JP - This is a good place for the thread, new members and beginners might find the discussion interesting.
Great! If this is going to benefit anyone, the thread is worth it.
01-08-2010, 01:22 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by blackcloudbrew Quote
Goodness, I use it a lot. Manual mode or to reset ev etc. Also with old manual lenses for stop down metering. It's one of the very nice contols on my Pentax k10/20 that I'd be lost without. It's also useful becuse I reset the camera and can keep my eye in the eyepiece at the same time.
That is one aspect of this button which I have read about: stop-down metering.
I have yet to possess such an "old" lens that requires the method but I am sure that if I do, one day we never know, the magic of the Green will come handy.

JP
01-08-2010, 01:24 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ash Quote
It's convenience in a nutshell.
Instant metering in M mode rather than having to switch camera modes just to meter a scene you would like to adjust settings to. Of course with metering in mind you could conceivably use hyper-P mode and make one of the adjustments there, but M mode is that much more flexible... meter and adjust the part of the triad you want.
Well said and summarized.
But I really don't think I will start using the P mode.
Thanks for the reply.

JP

01-08-2010, 01:30 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by jpzk Quote
I suppose you must make some fine adjustments after you hit this button, right? Or do you always hit the button, shhot, and your results are what you'd expect?
In M mode, using the Green button, the results are always exactly the same as they'd have been had you simply shot in Av mode: you pick the aperture, camera picks a shutter speed (and it would pick the *same* shutter speed in both cases, assuming the same ISO, same metering method, etc). The Green button is basically a way to allow you to take advantage of Av mode temporarily without actually moving the dial: just hit the Green button, and for your shutter speed is set exactly as Av mode would have. I find it *better* than Av mode, though, because in Av mode, the camera would then constantly alter that shutter speed from shot to shot depending on irrelevant details like how light or dark someone's shirt is, where with M mode, once it's set, it stays set until *I* change it. Of course, the part about it *staying* set is the advantage of M mode with or without the Green button; the only additional advantage of the Green button is how fast it is to choose an appropriate shutter speed as a starting point.

You don't *need* the button - you could sit there and spin dials until the meter reads 0.0 like Gary says and in fact I sometimes do also, so I can watch the meter change along the way (which helps me learn about the scene). Hitting the Green button does *exactly* the same thing - it just does it in one click.
01-08-2010, 01:58 PM   #21
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A couple of other quick comments;

The green button works as long as you hold it down for. In other words, it allows me to take over after I release the button, and adjust what I need without the camera changing things back to what I don't want. I set it once and if I get it right, I can take a series of shots knowing that things are not changing, and I'm getting consistant shots.

Another comment "pressing" the green button doesn't really work well. You need to hold it down for a moment so the camera has a chance to get the settings right (especially so on the K7)

Steve
01-08-2010, 02:08 PM   #22
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As Marc says, you can make some adjustments. I find that it is really useful when shooting landscape photos -- say a sunset. I can meter off of a spot and then keep my exposures the same as I shoot. Also, with panoramas, it makes a big difference to get them to line up well with good exposure. Same with silhouette shots -- meter off the background with the green button and then shoot your silhouettes to your heart's content.
01-08-2010, 02:34 PM   #23
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It can be quite useful when handing your camera to someone to take a shot of you

Jim

01-08-2010, 03:39 PM   #24
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Back home and just tried the Green button on the K20D and the K7 and, as everyone here claims: it is a great little gadget!
I seriously think that I will get used to this in manual mode.

Only thing is: it is so very near the AF buton on the K7 that I issed a few times.

Thanks to all for a great response!

JP
01-08-2010, 04:05 PM   #25
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I only use green button with Manual Aperture lenses in M mode.

but with 12 manual aperture lenses, it does get a lot of use.
01-08-2010, 04:29 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
In M mode, using the Green button, the results are always exactly the same as they'd have been had you simply shot in Av mode: you pick the aperture, camera picks a shutter speed (and it would pick the *same* shutter speed in both cases, assuming the same ISO, same metering method, etc). The Green button is basically a way to allow you to take advantage of Av mode temporarily without actually moving the dial: just hit the Green button, and for your shutter speed is set exactly as Av mode would have. I find it *better* than Av mode, though, because in Av mode, the camera would then constantly alter that shutter speed from shot to shot depending on irrelevant details like how light or dark someone's shirt is, where with M mode, once it's set, it stays set until *I* change it. Of course, the part about it *staying* set is the advantage of M mode with or without the Green button; the only additional advantage of the Green button is how fast it is to choose an appropriate shutter speed as a starting point.
This is exactly how I started using my camera today. I always used (Hyper) Program mode before, but when shooting outdoors in winter, the snow completely messes up the meter. For one shot I'd need to add +2 EV comp, and for another I'd need -1 EV comp. It would take me 3-4 tries at each shot, with minute adjustments just to get the exposure right. The only difference between the shots? The percentage of snow in the frame!!! No changes in lighting, no different subjects, not even really any difference in color. Just snow! Sometimes, if my shot was 1mm lower than the previous one, that would mess up the exposure again because I added snow to the scene!!!

So I've started using Manual mode with the green button. Now, when I setup for a shot, I can meter for that location and take shots of a lot of scenes in that area without having to worry about the meter. Some minute adjustments to shutter speed are sometimes necessary, like if there are trees around me blocking some light. But for the most part, I can do a lot more shooting and a lot less experimenting. I'm no longer deleting 4 pictures for every good one.At most, I *might* delete one for 3 good ones. That's a huge improvement.

QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
You don't *need* the button - you could sit there and spin dials until the meter reads 0.0 like Gary says and in fact I sometimes do also, so I can watch the meter change along the way (which helps me learn about the scene). Hitting the Green button does *exactly* the same thing - it just does it in one click.
It's one of those buttons that's mostly unnecessary and can safely be ignored by professional old-timers who are set in their ways. But for those who spend the time to learn how to take advantage of it, it's a brilliant time-saver. Just another one of those things that makes Pentax unique.
01-09-2010, 10:47 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by GoremanX Quote
This is exactly how I started using my camera today. I always used (Hyper) Program mode before, but when shooting outdoors in winter, the snow completely messes up the meter. For one shot I'd need to add +2 EV comp, and for another I'd need -1 EV comp. It would take me 3-4 tries at each shot, with minute adjustments just to get the exposure right. The only difference between the shots? The percentage of snow in the frame!!! No changes in lighting, no different subjects, not even really any difference in color. Just snow! Sometimes, if my shot was 1mm lower than the previous one, that would mess up the exposure again because I added snow to the scene!!!

So I've started using Manual mode with the green button. Now, when I setup for a shot, I can meter for that location and take shots of a lot of scenes in that area without having to worry about the meter. Some minute adjustments to shutter speed are sometimes necessary, like if there are trees around me blocking some light. But for the most part, I can do a lot more shooting and a lot less experimenting. I'm no longer deleting 4 pictures for every good one.At most, I *might* delete one for 3 good ones. That's a huge improvement.



It's one of those buttons that's mostly unnecessary and can safely be ignored by professional old-timers who are set in their ways. But for those who spend the time to learn how to take advantage of it, it's a brilliant time-saver. Just another one of those things that makes Pentax unique.
I found when using the camera in M mode that this button serves its due purpose. I was very reluctant to use it, even forgot completely that it was there until I became convinced to give it a go.
Mind you, I haven't shot a lot using this method but certainly will in the next few days.

JP
01-09-2010, 07:48 PM   #28
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I will first respond by saying "Never use it". I didn't really know how or what it was for.
That was until I read thru this post. Then today I got a chance to walk thru the Botanic Garden in Denver and used it for almost every shot. With the FA 100mm Macro mounted on my K20 and in the manual mode, the results were very good. The lighting changes constantly in the conservatory and "The Green Button" made almost every shot a keeper.
It's all the shared information on the forum that helps me get better at photography. Thanks to you all.
Jeff

Last edited by roverlr3; 01-09-2010 at 08:25 PM. Reason: Add pic
01-10-2010, 07:38 AM   #29
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No, I don't dial shutter speed anymore, thank goodness.
01-10-2010, 08:35 AM   #30
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This old dog just learned a new trick.

Always knew about the green button and the Hyper Program mode, it just never occurred to me to try it in manual.

NICE!
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