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02-16-2010, 06:56 PM   #1
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Extreme brightness bad for camera?

My friends and I do a lot of metal fabrication, involving welding, cutting, grinding, etc...

I love taking pictures of these activities, but I am worried about them having adverse effects on my K20d. Mostly I'm worried about taking pictures of welding. I stay far enough away from the arc to prevent any heat issues, but can the super-bright welding arc harm the the processor/camera? Looking at a welding arc with the naked eye will cause blindness quite quickly. As of yet I have been too worried about harming my camera to try it, but I would really like to experiment with photographing welding if I could be assured it would not harm my camera.

Any advice or thoughts is very much appreciated, thank you.

Chris

02-16-2010, 08:57 PM   #2
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The fraction of a second that the mirror is up and light is hitting the sensor shouldn't be a problem. I wouldn't try using live view though.

See also this discussion - https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/pentax-dslr-discussion/90482-sun-your-sensor.html


At the end of the day, if you are in doubt, don't.
02-16-2010, 09:55 PM   #3
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Surely you've thought of this:

Always compose and photograph arc through a piece of welding glass or using equivalent ND filter over lens; use external flash(es) for fill, but be sure to warn welder "fire in the hole" before pressing shutter so no flinching
02-16-2010, 10:36 PM   #4
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Here a few my friend took with his Canon DSLR. I find these pictures to be very interesting... I think I could really have some fun with this type of photography.





Thank you for your suggestions thus far. Thank you for the link as well, this is very much similar to photographing the sun I would think.

Chris

02-16-2010, 11:18 PM   #5
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I have a couple security cameras that, during some parts of the day, are directly pointed toward the sun. When this occurs the image on the monitor turns black at the brightest portions, but I have yet to have any lasting damage from this.

Granted this doesn't prove anything about the Pentax sensor, but I'd be surprised if it would harm it.
02-17-2010, 12:19 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by tfischer Quote
I have a couple security cameras that, during some parts of the day, are directly pointed toward the sun. When this occurs the image on the monitor turns black at the brightest portions, but I have yet to have any lasting damage from this.

Granted this doesn't prove anything about the Pentax sensor, but I'd be surprised if it would harm it.
This reminded me of a security camera my work had that was looking out a window. After a few months, the images captured started showing brown streaks across them which was the path of the setting sun.
02-22-2010, 03:02 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by SAChris Quote
...can the super-bright welding arc harm the the processor/camera? Looking at a welding arc with the naked eye will cause blindness quite quickly...
I'd be more worried about your eyes looking at the welds through the viewfinder. CCDs have color filter arrays that block most UV.
02-22-2010, 10:19 AM   #8
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I agree with saintabroad, I'd only look through the viewfinder through a welding mask. as the viewfinder must be reflecting the extremely bright visual spectrum as well as the uv rays straight to the eyeball!

02-22-2010, 05:17 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by saintabroad Quote
I'd be more worried about your eyes looking at the welds through the viewfinder. CCDs have color filter arrays that block most UV.
QuoteOriginally posted by cb750r Quote
I agree with saintabroad, I'd only look through the viewfinder through a welding mask. as the viewfinder must be reflecting the extremely bright visual spectrum as well as the uv rays straight to the eyeball!
This is a non-issue. I have been welding for many years and would never do anything to put myself at risk. I take every precaution when I work in the shop.

This thread is specifically about the camera/sensor.

Thanks for the replies,
Chris
02-22-2010, 06:43 PM   #10
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Ah! Link: Sensor-Film: Low pass filter

Someone around here must have a link to Pentax sensor filter construction...
02-23-2010, 11:27 AM   #11
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It's not only light intensity you should be afraid off!

I've worked in a steel factory a long time ago.
Designed and maintained the electronic controls of many equipment there.
High currents can create a lot of electromagnetic induction and many low voltage electronics equipment cannot handle that within short range.
It will simply burn some of the circuits, I've seen LED's simply burn out.

I will never bring my camera's within close range of high currents and induction peaks (as with welding can be the case).
Take a +100mm lens and stay away a couple of yards....

- Bert
02-26-2010, 12:19 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by bymy141 Quote
It's not only light intensity you should be afraid off!

I've worked in a steel factory a long time ago.
Designed and maintained the electronic controls of many equipment there.
High currents can create a lot of electromagnetic induction and many low voltage electronics equipment cannot handle that within short range.
It will simply burn some of the circuits, I've seen LED's simply burn out.

I will never bring my camera's within close range of high currents and induction peaks (as with welding can be the case).
Take a +100mm lens and stay away a couple of yards....

- Bert
Thats a good point. I doubt these welders have enough power to create such an effect, but its definitely something to consider. Thank you for your advice.

Chris
02-26-2010, 08:14 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by SAChris Quote
Thats a good point. I doubt these welders have enough power to create such an effect, but its definitely something to consider. Thank you for your advice.

Chris
Weld currents are between 100-150 Amps, initial peak currents being much higher.
Depending upon the curling of the leads that can create a strong magnetic induction.
Remember, weld currents are alternating.

In one situation we had a lot of problems with twisted pair communication lines running through an elevator shaft blowing out the driver chips all the time.

Just don't be surprised if something stops working

- Bert
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