Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
04-06-2010, 03:50 PM   #16
Site Supporter




Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Wilmington, Delaware
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 73
WMBP,

Thanks so much for a great tutorial to get started with flash. I've had lots of questions but hesitant to get started because it all seems a little overwhelming to a new user, but your replies are a big help.

I also went to your website and viewed your scenery group, they're great, really like your scenes of the recent snow.

Sharon

04-07-2010, 06:49 AM   #17
Junior Member




Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: mississippi
Posts: 38
Original Poster
Spot meter/color filters

wow those are cool shots for sure! Could you elaborate a bit about how to use a spot meter and tell me about those colored filters? Does orange work in all of those types of photos? As you can tell I am a newbie. Had a kx for about 4 mths.
Thanks for any info you can share.
04-07-2010, 07:10 AM   #18
Veteran Member
WMBP's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,496
QuoteOriginally posted by Penmacgal Quote
WMBP,

Thanks so much for a great tutorial to get started with flash. I've had lots of questions but hesitant to get started because it all seems a little overwhelming to a new user, but your replies are a big help.
I'm glad to hear it, Sharon. Actually, flash can be overwhelming even for somebody with a fair bit of knowledge and experience. Flash is hard.

Actually, it's not too hard at first, if you simply buy a hot-shoe flash, put your camera and the flash into their respective automatic exposure modes (P-TTL on the flash, P mode or Av mode on the camera), point the flash head directly forward, and start shooting. You'll usually get okay results this way.

The problems come when you try to do better than just okay, when you realize that the results you get from the default, easy flash configuration are not the best that are possible. When you start trying to balance ambient light with flash, and when you start trying to bounce the flash, or when you begin to worry about light fall-off or dealing with back-lit scenes, etc.—then you start to do things that may pay off nicely, but also, especially at first, will actually increase your risk of utter failure. This is why inexperienced event photographers who have read about more advanced techniques but haven't quite mastered them, sometimes produce worse results than the amateurs at the event who are simply snapping away thoughtlessly with their point and shoots.


QuoteQuote:
I also went to your website and viewed your scenery group, they're great, really like your scenes of the recent snow.
Thanks. There are some exposure issues to deal with carefully when you are photographing snow, but honestly, these aren't difficult shots technically. The keys to beautiful snowscape photos are (a) a willingness to tramp around in the cold, wet snow looking for (b) a beautiful snowscape. :-)

Will
04-07-2010, 07:21 AM   #19
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,068
QuoteOriginally posted by dehanson1 Quote
wow those are cool shots for sure! Could you elaborate a bit about how to use a spot meter and tell me about those colored filters? Does orange work in all of those types of photos? As you can tell I am a newbie. Had a kx for about 4 mths.
Thanks for any info you can share.
Well, if you haven't figured it out I cheated. I used BW film.

But you can still use a spot meter to asses a scene if you wanted to with digital or just use the spot meter mode in the camera for an assessment. But it would be easier to just trial and error the shot with a digital. In my case I metered the sky next to the Sun and got an EV value. Then metered the dark tree and obtained its EV value. The difference was up to 12 EV or more depending how close to the Sun I metered. Then I metered the shadows and sand. I decided the silhouetted tree would be 3 stops below my exposure which placed the shadows light enough to see through and the sky at a very high "bright white". Adding the Orange filter rendered Blue darker with BW film so it wouldn't appear white.

Finally, I added a 1/2 stop to my final decision to bump up low values and underdeveloped the roll of film by 20% to help compress the high values. Interesting that there is no "star effect" with the Sun due to aperture blades in these shots. The Sun was partly diffused by a very thin layer of mist in the atmosphere you can see in one of the shots. The location was by the ocean in the winter and I guess that was the reason.


Last edited by tuco; 04-07-2010 at 08:39 AM.
04-08-2010, 01:35 PM   #20
Junior Member




Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 45
Shooting against the sun can be tricky. It will help if there is some cloud covering the sun acting as a ND filter
04-09-2010, 09:39 AM   #21
Veteran Member
GerryL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 2,731
QuoteOriginally posted by LeDave Quote
I am not a big pro at back-light and have always wanted to know the proper way to do it also. I have a question myself.

Without using fill-flash, is there any way possible to do a sunlight back-lit shot without a overblown sky but yet still retain a small to fair amount of detail in the foreground whether it's under-exposed or not?

Here is some of my search's that I am wondering how they've done it. I'm not quite sure how these are done whether it was with flash or not, but if they can be done w/o flash then I'd love to know; otherwise is the chances are that they only be done using fill-flash?

I did not take these photos, they are for reference only.

On this photo, you can see clearly that there is a light source coming from the right side of the models.
It can either be reflectors or flash.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, foreground, mode, pentax help, photo, photography
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What kind of Bird is this? Eastern Shore Charlie Post Your Photos! 3 01-06-2009 02:25 AM
Something kind of different mel Post Your Photos! 19 05-30-2008 07:14 PM
The kind of photo that makes your mouth water... paden501 Post Your Photos! 9 02-13-2008 07:02 AM
What kind of tree??? Ed in GA Post Your Photos! 7 10-20-2007 01:01 PM
Two of a kind... pog Post Your Photos! 2 12-09-2006 09:30 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:24 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top