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05-02-2010, 02:25 AM   #1
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What would be ideal holiday settings to have minimal post processing

I'm going on holiday next week, and still experimenting with the ideal seetings for different circumstances. Now for Holiday, what would be the ideal settings to have minimal postprocessing. I'm taking the K7 and the Pentax SMC DA 18-250mm 3,5-6,3 ED AL .

What to select for
1) Program line
2) Highlight correction
3) Shadow correction

05-02-2010, 02:55 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ivo_Spohr Quote
I'm going on holiday next week, and still experimenting with the ideal seetings for different circumstances. Now for Holiday, what would be the ideal settings to have minimal postprocessing. I'm taking the K7 and the Pentax SMC DA 18-250mm 3,5-6,3 ED AL .

What to select for
1) Program line
2) Highlight correction
3) Shadow correction
If you want as little post processing as possible I would mainly adjust the JPG settings to my liking.
It's your choice but I am glad I shot in raw when I went on holiday last year after having my K200D for only four months. It gave me the chance to rectify my mistakes to some extend after my postprocessing skills became somewhat better. I only have shadow correction and I used a lot. But it did introduce some noise in the shadows. But perhaps the K7 is better in that regard!
05-02-2010, 03:03 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ivo_Spohr Quote
I'm going on holiday next week, and still experimenting with the ideal seetings for different circumstances. Now for Holiday, what would be the ideal settings to have minimal postprocessing. I'm taking the K7 and the Pentax SMC DA 18-250mm 3,5-6,3 ED AL .

What to select for
1) Program line
2) Highlight correction
3) Shadow correction
Hi Ivo, my personal (default / user settings) settings are (in Dutch, since that's what my camera shows me....):

- Wit balans: Helder, Fijne scherpte 2: +2
- Hooglichtcorrectie: off, Schaduwcorrectie: +2
- Auto ISO 100-1250, Parameters: normal
- Programmalijn: Scherptediepte groot

What I think matters to me as well are the custom menu's:
- C1: 1:1, 2:2, 3:2. 4:2, 5:1, 6:2, 7:2
- C2: 8:2, 9:2, 10:1, 11:1, 12:1, 13:1, 14:1
- C3: all 1
- C4: 22:1, 23:2, 24:4, 25:4, 26:1, 27:3, 28:1
- C5: all 1
- C6: 36:2, 37:2 (make sure to calibrate your lens with the K-7), 38:2

The DA 18-250mm (like my Tamron 18-250mm) suffers a lot from vignetting at 18mm and purple fringing in high contrast modes.
I do not know if the "Objectiefcorrectie" settings can correct this for you in camera for that lens. I don't have it.
You may want to test it. Just shoot a blue sky (yes, I know, you live in Holland ) with correction on/off and see if the darker corners are corrected for.
If it can, you might want to select this to avoid doing this in post processing.
But be aware of the impact of the camera response, it becomes much, much slower. For instance in generating a preview.

- Bert
05-02-2010, 03:18 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by bymy141 Quote
Hi Ivo, my personal (default / user settings) settings are (in Dutch, since that's what my camera shows me....):

- Wit balans: Helder, Fijne scherpte 2: +2
- Hooglichtcorrectie: off, Schaduwcorrectie: +2
- Auto ISO 100-1250, Parameters: normal
- Programmalijn: Scherptediepte groot

What I think matters to me as well are the custom menu's:
- C1: 1:1, 2:2, 3:2. 4:2, 5:1, 6:2, 7:2
- C2: 8:2, 9:2, 10:1, 11:1, 12:1, 13:1, 14:1
- C3: all 1
- C4: 22:1, 23:2, 24:4, 25:4, 26:1, 27:3, 28:1
- C5: all 1
- C6: 36:2, 37:2 (make sure to calibrate your lens with the K-7), 38:2

The DA 18-250mm (like my Tamron 18-250mm) suffers a lot from vignetting at 18mm and purple fringing in high contrast modes.
I do not know if the "Objectiefcorrectie" settings can correct this for you in camera for that lens. I don't have it.
You may want to test it. Just shoot a blue sky (yes, I know, you live in Holland ) with correction on/off and see if the darker corners are corrected for.
If it can, you might want to select this to avoid doing this in post processing.
But be aware of the impact of the camera response, it becomes much, much slower. For instance in generating a preview.

- Bert
Bert, dank je/ thanks,

What would be your considerations for : Hooglichtcorrectie: off
I will hold you Custom menu settings against mine and will try to take best of both worlds

05-02-2010, 03:29 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ivo_Spohr Quote
Bert, dank je/ thanks,

What would be your considerations for : Hooglichtcorrectie: off
I will hold you Custom menu settings against mine and will try to take best of both worlds
It brings the lowest ISO setting of the camera to 200 ISO, I like 100 ISO better in daylight. Less noise over clipping for me.
If you look at the histogram, or set the show high / dark areas in the preview to on, you will see high light clipping while shooting and you can immediatly response with -1 Ev compensation. That's my approach.

Also, when in doubt, use the RAW button (set it to be RAW+ in the menu) and you can always fall back to the raw file... I know, post processing, but for this one special photo that is normally not too much to do I guess?

- Bert
05-02-2010, 10:28 AM   #6
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QuoteQuote:
... ideal seetings for different circumstances...
Just as no single lens works for every image, no single setting will wotk for every image.

Vacations are times when you typically want to save your memories in beautiful images, so I would shoot in RAW, then use the Pentax software to simply convert them all in a single batch to JPG (it might take an hour, so go eat dinner while it is working). For those shots that are just the way you want, great, you are done. For the others, you now have the possibility to improve them significantly.
05-02-2010, 10:57 PM   #7
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Best way to avoid the need for PP: learn how exposure works (aperture, shutter speed, and ISO - how they relate and how to control them) so you can apply compensation in the proper situations. That's why makes the biggest difference. None of the other settings are really worth the time it takes to experiment with.
05-03-2010, 09:26 AM   #8
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I would agree with mark

proper exposure is the best way to insure the shots turn out.

If you are shooting JPEGs, (from the question raised I would assume so) then there are other things to consider.

Use manual WB and set it when you go from inside to outside for the closest lighting conditions, or leave it always on daylight.

You can play with contrast especially setting contrast low on bright sunny days and high on cloudy days, as well as the shadow detail and highlight detail settings if the conditions warrant, but these things take a little experience.

I change all the settings mentioned above as a function of lighting condition, and shooting situation, but I have been doing so for many years now. It takes a little practice to know when to change the settings.

05-03-2010, 05:22 PM   #9
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Hi,

Minimal process to me means no processing at all. If you look at this gallery, entirely shot with the K-7 there are 4 images that are stitched panoramas, everything else is JPEG straight out the camera (minus the resize and servier-side watermarking of course):

Neoluminance | Guatemala Gallery

It's a matter of style but if you want to be as real as can be, as I do. Calibrate the camera by trying all the image parameters on a color-calibration chart and set the camera to what delivers the closest results to reality. You won't need to change image paramters ever again. Shoot at the highest quality JPEG for maximum printing sizes.

Aperture, ISO, shutter-speed and white-balance have to be selected for each photo of course. Start with the most important, usualy framing first (zooming, framing), then focus, then depth-of-field by controlling the aperture, then the ISO to prevent shutter-speeds from going too low.

- Itai
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05-03-2010, 05:42 PM   #10
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1) Auto ISO should be banned to hell. If you're in bright sun, you shoot 100 to 400, and not let the camera choose 800 for you. If you're in a pub and shooting in Av mode, see what ISOs 1600 to 3200 do to your shutter speeds based on your selected aperture.

2) Highlight correction off.

3) Use all of the camera's other default settings more or less, because there's no such thing as ideal settings.
05-03-2010, 08:33 PM   #11
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The DA 18-250mm suffers from vignetting at the low end(18mm) and purple fringing in high contrast modes.

Agreed with Marc's comments. Proper exposure is the best way to ensure a good results.

Assuming that you are shooting in JPEGs, factors to consider are :
1) WB - use manual WB and set it to the closest lighting conditions.
(and/or leave it always on daylight as suggested by Lowell).
2) Use the highest quality JPEG
3) Aperture, ISO and shutter-speed have to be selected for each photo to get the best picture out
4) Set low contrast on bright sunny days and high contrast on dark cloudy days.
5) Last but not least, set the shadow detail and highlight detail depending on the surrounding conditions.

Hope that is of help.
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