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06-29-2010, 10:26 AM   #91
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QuoteOriginally posted by Paleo Pete Quote
Exactly what I do, sometimes I have to go +, sometimes -, it depends on the light. This whole thread seemed a bit strange to me, because my K-x seems to overexpose more than under.That may be my settings though, and I'm not totally familiar with all the various on camera settings yet either.
No, no, no. That's far too subjective an opinion! Not allowed. The title thread is definitive.

This argument goes on in every forum for every brand. Every DSLR currently in manufacture allows the shooter to note a scene that may have contrast issues, and dial in a preference prior to taking the shot. This is not a camera brand problem. I shot Nikon for years and the same issue cropped up with every new model.


Last edited by Aristophanes; 06-30-2010 at 06:36 AM.
06-29-2010, 12:05 PM   #92
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My experience wrt colors is that when I was starting out, I wanted every picture to pop, and every color to be vibrant and saturated. It's a very easy look to achieve, just boost the definition and vibrancy sliders (I use Aperture 3).
However, I like to think that I have matured somewhat, and now prefer a more laid back look or understated look. with natural colors. Of course it all depends on the image, but I think it's very common for beginners to want that in-your-face look. Not saying this is the case here, and I think you have been very reasonable in your replies here, PentaxForums-User.
06-29-2010, 12:37 PM   #93
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QuoteOriginally posted by egordon99 Quote
Here's an interesting read from "the other side"

Canon colors vs Nikon colors - Canon Digital Photography Forums

Basically, it would be a HUGE waste for you to switch to Canon JUST because you don't want to take the time to tweak the Pentax's JPG settings. And this is coming from a Canon user
Wow, am I the only one who thinks the Nikon colors are hideous?
Anyways, with RAW this point is moot, and you are in full control of the colors yourself, which is the way it should be!
06-29-2010, 12:49 PM   #94
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As a new Pentax user (K7 on the way) I will probably notice this pretty fast being that I'm coming from 3 Canon camera's and a Canon camcorder. To exacerbate this even more I often run the Canon's in Vivid and manual settings to boost saturation. I like oversaturation and vibrant colors.

I considered in research that the Pentax will be more "grey" than the Canon and I do have Lightroom 3 which I use to adjust pretty much all colors individually to my liking only for pictures that are going to be shared en masse or for prints.

I will share what I see from a new user perspective. The Canon's I use are a SD5-- ELPH a S2IS (slr-ish superzoom) and a SX200IS (12x zoom compact). If I find a mix of settings that duplicates the "canon" look I will probably use that if I don't like the "underexposed" look the Pentax gives. I am not overly concerned in the end as Lightroom can manipulate photo's to a staggering degree.

06-29-2010, 04:40 PM   #95
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Unfortunately, I have to agree that Pentax dSLRs tend to underexpose and undersaturate their images. I have a K2000 which I always have to set at +0.5 EV to get the images to brighten up.

I was recently was helping at my church's Vacation Bible School as the "official" photographer. One day I used the K2000 and on another day I used my Canon S2 P&S. When I made a "slide show" to show at the closing service, you could distinctly tell which pictures had been taken with the K2000 and which with the Canon as the Pentax's picture were not as saturated or as bright as the Canon's. (And the light conditions on both days were the same: late morning sun.)

A fellow photographer made a comment about the difference in picture quality and when I told him they were taken with two cameras, he guessed the opposite: he thought naturally a dSLR would take the brighter, richer pictures compared to an relatively old P&S.
06-29-2010, 05:32 PM   #96
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You can do extended adjustments in custom menus. Tweak exposure, adjust saturation etc.
I am a lazy pig, prefer out of the box j pegs till the going gets tough, then RAW rules.

Last edited by Ex Finn.; 06-29-2010 at 05:37 PM.
06-29-2010, 05:33 PM   #97
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QuoteOriginally posted by Littleofeverything Quote
Unfortunately, I have to agree that Pentax dSLRs tend to underexpose and undersaturate their images. I have a K2000 which I always have to set at +0.5 EV to get the images to brighten up.

I was recently was helping at my church's Vacation Bible School as the "official" photographer. One day I used the K2000 and on another day I used my Canon S2 P&S. When I made a "slide show" to show at the closing service, you could distinctly tell which pictures had been taken with the K2000 and which with the Canon as the Pentax's picture were not as saturated or as bright as the Canon's. (And the light conditions on both days were the same: late morning sun.)

A fellow photographer made a comment about the difference in picture quality and when I told him they were taken with two cameras, he guessed the opposite: he thought naturally a dSLR would take the brighter, richer pictures compared to an relatively old P&S.
Your friend's assumption was misguided. Point and shoot cameras very often juice up photos because they expect their inexperienced user to want "wow" rather than realism. When you set my wife's Canon P&S for "sunset" it actually adds colors to the white balance to intensify the sunset. Shoot a normal subject outdoors in "sunset" mode and it has a reddish gold cast.

That being said, the Pentax philosophy has generally been even more understated, less processed and more allegedly "realistic" even than other DSLR lines. You saw this philosophy discussed a lot in reviews when the K10d came out. It is assumed that you can add all the zap later, if you want, or you can adjust the settings in the camera to get there.
06-29-2010, 05:46 PM   #98
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QuoteOriginally posted by Littleofeverything Quote
A fellow photographer made a comment about the difference in picture quality and when I told him they were taken with two cameras, he guessed the opposite: he thought naturally a dSLR would take the brighter, richer pictures compared to an relatively old P&S
No, DSLR's - especially Pentax DSLR's - strive for *accurate* exposure and color. It's P&S cameras that tend to strive for artificially brightened exposure and color. And it's true that people coming from the P&S world are often surprised by this, and find they don't like the more accurate exposure and color of the DSLR. That's a common enough perception. And there's nothing wrong with subjectively preferring artificially brightened exposure and color. That's why DSR's provide controls to allow you get these if you like.

06-29-2010, 06:51 PM   #99
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QuoteOriginally posted by Littleofeverything Quote
Unfortunately, I have to agree that Pentax dSLRs tend to underexpose and undersaturate their images. I have a K2000 which I always have to set at +0.5 EV to get the images to brighten up.

I was recently was helping at my church's Vacation Bible School as the "official" photographer. One day I used the K2000 and on another day I used my Canon S2 P&S. When I made a "slide show" to show at the closing service, you could distinctly tell which pictures had been taken with the K2000 and which with the Canon as the Pentax's picture were not as saturated or as bright as the Canon's. (And the light conditions on both days were the same: late morning sun.)

A fellow photographer made a comment about the difference in picture quality and when I told him they were taken with two cameras, he guessed the opposite: he thought naturally a dSLR would take the brighter, richer pictures compared to an relatively old P&S.
I used to have a Canon S3 IS and I was so happy with the pictures taken by it and I liked to show those off to friends . Then my ex wife took it with her so I bought a K10D .
Now once in a while, when I looked at those pictures, I thought ........... "What was wrong with my eyes by then ?"
06-29-2010, 07:14 PM   #100
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QuoteOriginally posted by PentaxForums-User Quote
Why does Pentax consistently UNDER-EXPOSE and usually under-saturate images?
They don't. The K-7 overexposes. It will blow out the highlights in most high contrast landscapes. The K10D meter was far better...
06-29-2010, 07:33 PM   #101
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Sheesh, complain a bit more please. My old D40X overexposed by 1-2EV usually, and also underexposed up to 2EV. I don't think you're so hard done by because you have to manually adjust a few things. The camera does not and should not do everything for you.

Person behind the gear, not the gear.
06-29-2010, 07:33 PM   #102
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QuoteOriginally posted by PentaxForums-User Quote
Sadly, without being so harsh, and still loving my Pentax and it's potential... and hoping for a better Pentax future with newer models in years to come... I have to sadly agree with much of this review for the K-7. It describes the problems I'm having.

But before you shoot me... just know I'm sticking with Pentax for the other reasons we love the Big P.
So both of you found the one review out of 40+ that was negative. Good job ignoring the 38 reviews that gave it 5 stars.
06-29-2010, 07:42 PM   #103
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cinders Quote
I just want to say, this thread got me thinking about fixing the problem. I went into custom image, and upped the saturation and hue just a little bit, and I'm already noticing a noticeable and much improved picture in my opinion. I'm so glad I decided to mess with it.
That's the mystery to me. The K20D (and I assume the K7) let you almost infinitely adjust every in-camera setting, if you don't like the umpteen pre-sets. You can pretty much make any dSLR out today look like any other dSLR out today, in terms of color. They all have such a wide range of adjustments. And it's a "set it once and forget it" thing. Oh well...
06-29-2010, 09:55 PM   #104
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QuoteOriginally posted by rfortson Quote
That's the mystery to me. The K20D (and I assume the K7) let you almost infinitely adjust every in-camera setting, if you don't like the umpteen pre-sets. You can pretty much make any dSLR out today look like any other dSLR out today, in terms of color. They all have such a wide range of adjustments. And it's a "set it once and forget it" thing. Oh well...
and if you don't like that, there is raw and Photoshop.
06-30-2010, 04:14 AM   #105
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I used to bump saturation/vibrance slider a bit in photoshop, but I seldom do now. I would rather have my photos stand out for other reasons than that I really juiced them or, used odd filters on them. Why not just go all the way and shoot HDR? That way, the sky and the background can all pop simultaneously. The answer to me is realism. I would rather remember things (basically) as the way they were, rather than some over saturated version of it.

It is awfully easy to move those sliders in photoshop or whatever software you use. ACR lets you adjust all of you photos simultaneously that you are editing, so you can over saturate them all at once prior to editing them individually.
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