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07-13-2010, 09:18 PM   #16
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I shoot this kind of scene all the time in Mount Shasta, a very rural area. I shoot the sky and use the Shadow/Highlight or Curves tools to bring back the mountains and forest.

07-14-2010, 03:28 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pritch Quote
Besides the ND filter suggestion, are there any strategies/settings that will maybe mix the exposure of the bright sky and darker foreground, to come to a happy medium?
See post # 2 in this thread. You can bracket three or more shots and then blend them in post.

Here's a link for an example of how to do this.

Digital Blending
07-14-2010, 01:24 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by tarsus Quote
I shoot this kind of scene all the time in Mount Shasta, a very rural area. I shoot the sky and use the Shadow/Highlight or Curves tools to bring back the mountains and forest.
As others said, RAW will give you more leeway to do this. And I don't use HDR, but unless I'm mistaken, the above is just an inferior form of HDR.
07-14-2010, 06:18 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by CWyatt Quote
As others said, RAW will give you more leeway to do this. And I don't use HDR, but unless I'm mistaken, the above is just an inferior form of HDR.
You are mistaken.

07-14-2010, 06:43 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
You are mistaken.
Be useful if you can fill it out a bit.
07-14-2010, 10:30 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by CWyatt Quote
As others said, RAW will give you more leeway to do this. And I don't use HDR, but unless I'm mistaken, the above is just an inferior form of HDR.
HDR involves a complete merging of several differently exposed shots of the same scene.
I think many of us are familiar with the "HDR look" which you may or may not find pleasing.

Digital blending involves placing the brightly exposed shot on a different layer from the underexposed shot, selectively applying masks to different parts of the photo. The masking brush & opacity controls allow you to selective use portions of either the brighter or darker photo, or % combination of both in different locations.

Its more work than HDR, but gives you more control and can give you a more natural looking final result than HDR.

I've only ever tried it a few times - "too lazy" to get it right.
07-14-2010, 10:43 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by kittykat46 Quote
HDR involves a complete merging of several differently exposed shots of the same scene.
I think many of us are familiar with the "HDR look" which you may or may not find pleasing.

Digital blending involves placing the brightly exposed shot on a different layer from the underexposed shot, selectively applying masks to different parts of the photo. The masking brush & opacity controls allow you to selective use portions of either the brighter or darker photo, or % combination of both in different locations.

Its more work than HDR, but gives you more control and can give you a more natural looking final result than HDR.

I've only ever tried it a few times - "too lazy" to get it right.
Actually, I think what Tarsus is suggesting is much simpler even than that and is more like what you suggested in an earlier post. Just expose for the highlights (sky) and use the curves or fill in the RAW converter to bring up the shadows (mountains) to an acceptable brightness. I don't think he's suggesting that differently exposed images be combined at all, through masking or otherwise, though some selective exposure compensation can be done with masking the same image. He does what I do, because blown highlights are generally harder to recover than shadows in a digital photo.

Last edited by GeneV; 07-14-2010 at 10:49 PM.
07-15-2010, 06:38 PM   #23
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I do shoot in RAW, and use Aperture to import my photos. I can usually correct an over-exposed sky, but sometimes there's not a whole lot I can do. But I am a beginner at that software too.

But it sounds like it's better to have a good sky, then bring up the foreground later in post? Which is better for landscapes like this. Center weighted metering, or multi-segment?

07-16-2010, 05:55 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pritch Quote
I do shoot in RAW, and use Aperture to import my photos. I can usually correct an over-exposed sky, but sometimes there's not a whole lot I can do. But I am a beginner at that software too.

But it sounds like it's better to have a good sky, then bring up the foreground later in post? Which is better for landscapes like this. Center weighted metering, or multi-segment?
As a beginner, multi-segment might be the best option. In that mode, the camera will, as Marc suggested, usually attempt to preserve the highlights. As most of us become more comfortable with exposure concepts, center weighting is usually the next mode to learn. Some of the later Pentax cameras have adjustments which force the camera to give even more weight to preserving the highlights or shadows, as the user selects.

However, one of the great things about digital is that you can easily and cheaply bracket your exposures. With a static landscape scene and contrast pushing or exceeding the capability of the sensor, I apply exposure compensation and take several shots. (Actually, I did this in the days of Kodachrome as well, but more selectively due to the cost.)
07-16-2010, 12:08 PM   #25
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Doesn't really matter whatmetering mode you use - no matter what mode you use, you can't expect the default exposure to be whatyou want in all settings. So it's just a matter of getting familair how to meter effectively with whatever mdoe you do choose - and by meter effectively, I mean knowing when to use exposure lock or other techniques to bass your metering off soemthing other than the scene itself, and when to use exposure compensation. There's no getting around that if you care about the results as you obviously do.
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