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07-28-2010, 07:30 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by kittykat46 Quote
I've noticed a higher risk of getting blown-out highlights with the K-7 when shooting wide angles 10-20mm and bright light. It happens with different lenses.

In a situation like that (wide angle, bright, contrasty scene), I normally dial down -1 E/V, then adjust the RAW file for shadows and mid-tones in PP.
I also shoot almost all the time in P mode

I have noticed the same issue when shooting bright situation specifically bright sunny day on a sandy beach, this was even more noticed when I had my zoom set wide. The darker parts of the driftwood looked great and the sky was crisp blue but the fine details of the waves and the tiny details in the near white portions of drift wood logs had a tendency to blow out.

After looking closely at several of the shots in the LED screen I noticed this and added a nuetral density filter to help out. Then the darker parts where slightly to dark but post processing was great to bring them out.

I am not sure that this is a fault specific to K7 since I have had similar experience with my previous Olympus DSLR. I think almost any camera trying to determine exposure in such a high contrast situation will struggle to get all the details exposed correctly.

My experience is that its far better to slightly under expose a few areas to save the bright areas then fix it in post processing.

07-28-2010, 08:13 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jon in SC Quote
I also shoot almost all the time in P mode

I have noticed the same issue when shooting bright situation specifically bright sunny day on a sandy beach, this was even more noticed when I had my zoom set wide. The darker parts of the driftwood looked great and the sky was crisp blue but the fine details of the waves and the tiny details in the near white portions of drift wood logs had a tendency to blow out.

After looking closely at several of the shots in the LED screen I noticed this and added a nuetral density filter to help out. Then the darker parts where slightly to dark but post processing was great to bring them out.

I am not sure that this is a fault specific to K7 since I have had similar experience with my previous Olympus DSLR. I think almost any camera trying to determine exposure in such a high contrast situation will struggle to get all the details exposed correctly.

My experience is that its far better to slightly under expose a few areas to save the bright areas then fix it in post processing.
Preserving the highlights is a good rule of thumb. So what are you going to do when there are 15 stops of light in your scene at the next sunny beach you may visit? Do you expect to salvage all dark areas then?
07-28-2010, 08:29 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Preserving the highlights is a good rule of thumb. So what are you going to do when there are 15 stops of light in your scene at the next sunny beach you may visit? Do you expect to salvage all dark areas then?
And the answer is: HDR
07-28-2010, 08:43 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by mithrandir Quote
And the answer is: HDR
But it is a picture of the person's child running and playing on the beach and the tripod was left at home

07-28-2010, 11:28 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
But it is a picture of the person's child running and playing on the beach and the tripod was left at home
Within the Dynamic Range limits of current mid-level dSLRs, the best approach would be to dial down - E/V, minimum ISO, shoot RAW.

With the K-7, ISO 100, you can recover +2 E/V from the RAW file in PP later, pull back the highlights, still with reasonably good IQ in the shadow areas.

There's no perfect answer, but it is possible to get a very decent shot without blown out highlights.
07-28-2010, 11:43 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Preserving the highlights is a good rule of thumb. So what are you going to do when there are 15 stops of light in your scene at the next sunny beach you may visit? Do you expect to salvage all dark areas then?
Well, personally, I find that beach scenes are not that demanding, DR-wise...

The subjects are pretty well lit from everywhere, with a good fill effect from the sand and sea...

Night scenes are more problematic, in my view, with street lights easily blown out...
07-29-2010, 02:03 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by tiltman Quote
High speed with the built-in flash ?
I assumed using a proper external flash.
07-29-2010, 02:29 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by simico Quote
I assumed using a proper external flash.
I see. However, this "photo session" was during the climb of a sea cliff (starting from a boat), external flashes become a little ... unpractical.

07-29-2010, 11:31 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Preserving the highlights is a good rule of thumb. So what are you going to do when there are 15 stops of light in your scene at the next sunny beach you may visit? Do you expect to salvage all dark areas then?
If by "salvage" you mean, artificially make them look brighter than they naturally are, sure you can do that.

But for me, if a shadow really is 15 stops darker than the highlights, I'd rather it come out looking that way.

Last edited by Marc Sabatella; 07-30-2010 at 08:40 AM.
07-30-2010, 02:29 AM   #25
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Hey guys, I thought I would add my experience here.

I have always mainly shot aircraft and aviation until recently starting out in Glamour (yes quite a bit of difference there!)

Seems that with majority of my lenses I have to use +0.3 E/V most of the time with my 10-20mm depending on the shot. I have to use that all the time on my 135-400mm, and with aircraft I shoot in Tv mode majority of the time.
07-30-2010, 08:41 AM   #26
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Makes sense that you'd often need positive compensation with airplanes - tend to be shiny metal (and hence brighter than the average scene), and when in flight, they are seen against bright sky.
07-30-2010, 03:51 PM   #27
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Not just in-flight - all the time! It's been the same on all Pentax digital bodies I've owned.
07-30-2010, 10:40 PM   #28
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Yes, but as I said, airplanes are shiny metal - pretty much always lighter than the the average scene and therefore requiring positive compenation.
08-05-2010, 11:55 AM   #29
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thanks

Hey guys & girls

Thanks a lot for taking your time to offer all these possible causes and solutions. I know it would have been better if there would have been actual photos but as it goes I posted them in another thread and couldn't get them to repost in this thread. Next week I will be at the beach and will try to take a hard look at some of the things you all have pointed out to see what exactly will solve or minimize my problem. Thanks again for all your help. I really appreciate it.
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