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08-21-2007, 04:02 PM   #1
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Pentax got it right with the K10D

I'm really loving my K10D. Had some color issues at first, but I calibrated my camera with ACR and now I'm very happy with the results. But I'm just so impressed with the ergonomics, functionality and little creative touches Pentax put into the 10D. Multiple exposure is just one example. So cool that they put that capability in there... I'm having fun with it.





08-21-2007, 04:41 PM   #2
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Calibrated it with ACR? I am new to this what did you do?
08-21-2007, 05:52 PM   #3
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Wow

QuoteOriginally posted by switters Quote
I'm really loving my K10D. Had some color issues at first, but I calibrated my camera with ACR and now I'm very happy with the results. But I'm just so impressed with the ergonomics, functionality and little creative touches Pentax put into the 10D. Multiple exposure is just one example. So cool that they put that capability in there... I'm having fun with it.



Those are awesome!!!

Ben
08-21-2007, 07:57 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by switters Quote
I'm really loving my K10D. Had some color issues at first, but I calibrated my camera with ACR and now I'm very happy with the results. But I'm just so impressed with the ergonomics, functionality and little creative touches Pentax put into the 10D. Multiple exposure is just one example. So cool that they put that capability in there... I'm having fun with it.
Yes, it's a wonderful camera.

Love those shots -- especially the first one. How did you make it? Very creative.

Will

08-21-2007, 08:37 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by harv3589 Quote
Calibrated it with ACR? I am new to this what did you do?
Check here:
creativepro.com - Out of Gamut: Calibrating Camera Raw in Photoshop CS (overview)
ACR Calibrator L download page (calibration script - this is what worked for me)

ck
08-21-2007, 08:44 PM   #6
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Will and Ben,

Thanks for your feedback - I'm glad you like them.

This really is an amazing feature... normally only available with certain film cameras (like the Holga) that allow you to expose multiple images on the same frame of film without advancing it.

On the K10D, select "menu" and scroll down to "multiple exposure". Choose the number of exposures you want to overlap. I'd recommend starting with 2 and getting a hang of that. What's even better is that if you check the second box "auto EV adjust", the K10D will automatically calculate the proper exposure for each frame based on how many exposures you are layering. This is so cool! With film you would have to underexpose each layered frame manually so that the total exposure adds up to the correct value. The manual explains it all quite well.

For the first photo, I first took a picture of a brown wood fence. Then I took a picture of the purple flowers. The way this works is the lighter parts of each image will show up... so you see the purple flowers standing out against the brighter areas of the wood fence. In the second image, I took a picture of a cobblestone sidewalk, and then of a very bright fern. The final result has a kind of "Jackson Pollack" look that I like.

Hope this helps,
Chris
08-21-2007, 09:42 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by switters Quote
On the K10D, select "menu" and scroll down to "multiple exposure".
Just for the record, I knew how to use the multiple exposure feature.<g>

It is an interesting feature and when I got my K10D I had fun with it, too. I've wondered if it could be used as a sort of poor-man's HDR but haven't had the time to try the idea out.


QuoteQuote:
For the first photo, I first took a picture of a brown wood fence. Then I took a picture of the purple flowers. The way this works is the lighter parts of each image will show up... so you see the purple flowers standing out against the brighter areas of the wood fence. In the second image, I took a picture of a cobblestone sidewalk, and then of a very bright fern. The final result has a kind of "Jackson Pollack" look that I like.
That's what I was wondering about. Thanks. Well done.

Will
08-22-2007, 06:43 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
Just for the record, I knew how to use the multiple exposure feature.<g>

It is an interesting feature and when I got my K10D I had fun with it, too. I've wondered if it could be used as a sort of poor-man's HDR but haven't had the time to try the idea out.

Will
Figured you already knew, but wanted to explain for the benefit of others!

That's an interesting idea about the "poor man's HDR". I assume you mean turning off the Auto EV compensation, putting the camera on a tripod and doing a multiple exposure where you manually adjust the exposures throughout to expose for both highlights and shadows?

This might work well for those who don't own Photoshop and can't use the bracketing method.

Chris

08-22-2007, 06:55 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by switters Quote
That's an interesting idea about the "poor man's HDR". I assume you mean turning off the Auto EV compensation, putting the camera on a tripod and doing a multiple exposure where you manually adjust the exposures throughout to expose for both highlights and shadows?
Precisely.

Of course, it might not work, perhaps probably would not work. I assume that HDR software analyzes the dynamic range of the photos and then revises the levels throughout the entire photo in order to spread them around as fully as possible. Multiple exposures in themselves wouldn't do that. But I'm still curious about what it would do and will try to remember to do some test shots next time I'm out with a tripod.

Anyway, back to the K10D, there's a lot to like about it. I love TAv mode and the front and back e-dials, among other things. I'm learning to make use of the User function on the mode dial, too, although I keep changing my mind about what to do with it.

Will
08-22-2007, 12:27 PM   #10
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RE: Poor man's HDR

Hello,

I've tried the multiple exposure as a sort of poor man's HDR.
What I found was that it wasn't really doing any good (for me at least) that way. The reason is obvious enough that with the "Auto EV adjust" it simply calculates the correct exposure value for the metered target, and makes sure you 'hit' the correct value.

So I tried with 3-6 (I think) exposures, and sure enough, it blew the highlights that I didn't expose for.

Some might get it to work, I'm not an expert, but it failed for me.
If someone does get it to work it would be nice if they posted the "howto" and result somewhere on this forum.

BTW: I loved the pictures and the effect you made with the multiple exposure.

Regards,
Beej80
08-22-2007, 02:18 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
Just for the record, I knew how to use the multiple exposure feature.<g>

It is an interesting feature and when I got my K10D I had fun with it, too. I've wondered if it could be used as a sort of poor-man's HDR but haven't had the time to try the idea out.




That's what I was wondering about. Thanks. Well done.

Will
QuoteOriginally posted by Beej80 Quote
Hello,

I've tried the multiple exposure as a sort of poor man's HDR.
What I found was that it wasn't really doing any good (for me at least) that way. The reason is obvious enough that with the "Auto EV adjust" it simply calculates the correct exposure value for the metered target, and makes sure you 'hit' the correct value.

BTW: I loved the pictures and the effect you made with the multiple exposure.

Regards,
Beej80
Thanks for the feedback on the pictures. I'm having a lot of fun with ME!

Question: have you tried the "HDR technique" without Auto EV adjust selected in the multiple exposure menu? Seems to me that if this is unchecked and exposures are controlled manually, the results would be much better.

Still, as I believe Will mentioned I wouldn't expect much. I'm guessing that Photoshop's HDR plug-in uses some pretty sophisticated algorithms to merge the exposures together. I do have Photoshop, so I haven't been too motivated to try the in-camera HDR technique suggested here.

Chris
08-22-2007, 02:27 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by switters Quote
Still, as I believe Will mentioned I wouldn't expect much. I'm guessing that Photoshop's HDR plug-in uses some pretty sophisticated algorithms to merge the exposures together. I do have Photoshop, so I haven't been too motivated to try the in-camera HDR technique suggested here.
I have only dabbled with HDR a couple of times, and know nothing really. But the more I think about it, the clearer it becomes to me that HDR MUST do a sort of selective area analysis of the shots. So if the sky is bright, the HDR software would darken the sky a bit in order to bring out the shading in the clouds; but if the woods in the same photo were rather dark, the software would adjust the levels in THAT area of the photo to lighten things up a bit and make the details come out. If the dynamic range of a photo is somewhere around 6 stops, you can't increase that. But you can increase the dynamic range of this or that area of the photo somewhat.

Where using multiple exposures to create a single image in the camera would, I suspect, simply average the exposure for each pixel without regard to its context, and I'd bet a nickel it wouldn't be interesting at all.

Hope to test it tomorrow just for kicks. Didn't have time today. But that's my hypothesis.

Sorry, didn't mean to hijack this thread with a stupid idea. Would love to see more photos of multiple exposures if anybody has anything interesting.

Will
08-22-2007, 04:37 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
I have only dabbled with HDR a couple of times, and know nothing really. But the more I think about it, the clearer it becomes to me that HDR MUST do a sort of selective area analysis of the shots. So if the sky is bright, the HDR software would darken the sky a bit in order to bring out the shading in the clouds; but if the woods in the same photo were rather dark, the software would adjust the levels in THAT area of the photo to lighten things up a bit and make the details come out. If the dynamic range of a photo is somewhere around 6 stops, you can't increase that. But you can increase the dynamic range of this or that area of the photo somewhat.
Will
Yep, Photoshop definitely applies some magic with the HDR plug-in. See this from the Cambridge In Color website:

Photoshop creates an HDR file by using the EXIF information from each of your bracketed images to determine their shutter speed, aperture and ISO settings. It then uses this information to assess how much light came from each image region. Since this light may vary greatly in its intensity, Photoshop creates the HDR file using 32-bits to describe each color channel (as opposed to the usual 16 or 8-bits, as discussed in the tutorial on "Understanding Bit Depth").

High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photography in Photoshop CS2
08-22-2007, 05:47 PM   #14
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For an introduction to HDR imaging, I would recommend Photomatix Pro's free trial which is unlimted (the images are watermarked however). I found it easy to use with the K10's 5 shot auto bracket mode. The program works with the PEF files and prefers raw files in their linear mode. A quick read of the the help manual will get you started.

The link is: HDR photo software & plugin - Tone Mapping, Exposure Blending & HDR Imaging for photography

I will be adding this program to my workflow as I have decided to skip CS3 in favor of Lightzone (LightCrafts.com.....not Lightroom from Adobe). The combination of Photomatix Pro and Lightzone makes me feel I am back in my wet darkroom again...without the mess and the allergic reactions!
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