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08-05-2010, 10:26 AM   #1
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Help with lighting effects??

Alright, so I've never learned a lot about lighting, but I've always wondered how you get a good shot of someone standing in front of the sun. You know, like this?

Photos from JD Photography | Facebook

How do you make sure the front of the people aren't underexposed? And that yellow-ish lighting... is that an effect in Photoshop, Lightroom, camera filter? WHAT?! How do I do it? Any help is greatly appreciated! Thanks!!!

08-05-2010, 10:53 AM   #2
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Eeeech.

Facebook.

Can you legally post the photo here? If not, you're making it a bit difficult to see what it is you want to do.
08-05-2010, 10:57 AM   #3
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What do you mean, "legally post" the photo? It's not my photo, so I don't know if I'm allowed to post it. It's on an open group on Facebook, where else am I supposed to find it? :P
08-05-2010, 11:00 AM   #4
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As far as what you actually expose off of, I dont know the answer. When I'm out practicing, what I would do is expose for the sky, maybe stop down once and go from there, take a snap, and adjust accordingly. But I do know that to get sunflare, you have to close up your AP a good bit. starting at about F11 I've gotten some cool sunflare. Also, if you have a UV filter on your lens, it can keep you from getting sunflare like that, so I always take mine off when tryng stuff like this. Again, I've only ever practiced wtih cool sun shots with my kids and have never really done it with clients...Yet. But I"m hoping to be able to confidently do stuff like this wiithout even having to think about what my settings should be.

08-05-2010, 11:01 AM   #5
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Ok, here's a good example of the sort of lighting I was referring to:

juliadavis's Gallery
08-05-2010, 11:05 AM   #6
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Sara,
I would recommend playing with what is called "fill flash". You increase the shutter speed to reduce the exposure of the background, and adjust your flash to correct the lighting of your subjects in the foreground. With most camera/flashes, you can set the exposure of the camera and flash independently.


(If someone's photo is public, you are usually by law allowed to link it. Not sure what the forum rules here are about that....)
08-05-2010, 03:30 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sara Hanna Quote
Alright, so I've never learned a lot about lighting, but I've always wondered how you get a good shot of someone standing in front of the sun. You know, like this?

Photos from JD Photography | Facebook

How do you make sure the front of the people aren't underexposed? And that yellow-ish lighting... is that an effect in Photoshop, Lightroom, camera filter? WHAT?! How do I do it? Any help is greatly appreciated! Thanks!!!
Very simple..Don't meter for the sun, but on the subject using spot metering. Take of your lens shade and allow for the sun to go directly in to the lens. The camera will meter for the subject and as a result burn them out as the sun will be at least 3-4 stops hotter also giving you the intentional flare you are looking for.
08-05-2010, 04:11 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by benjikan Quote
Very simple..Don't meter for the sun, but on the subject using spot metering. Take of your lens shade and allow for the sun to go directly in to the lens. The camera will meter for the subject and as a result burn them out as the sun will be at least 3-4 stops hotter also giving you the intentional flare you are looking for.
THANK YOU!! That makes perfect sense. I'll try that next time I'm out in the sun shooting!!

08-05-2010, 07:22 PM   #9
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The aged photo effect is the new HDR
(it's all post processing, btw. In the deviantart you linked to it's also likely that the flare/underxposure was pp'ed in as well as the color)
08-05-2010, 08:34 PM   #10
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After exposing using spot metering, there are PP effects that make the flared/backlit shots work well, particularly with desaturation and selective colouring.

Fill flash helps to avoid creating silhouettes in backlit conditions.
See how you go.
08-05-2010, 08:35 PM   #11
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If you can't repeat the effect with your Pentax, it may be the lens coatings.
Some things Canons are actually good for.
08-06-2010, 06:13 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by benjikan Quote
Very simple..Don't meter for the sun, but on the subject using spot metering.
For users of manual lenses, I'll point out that, on my K20D at least, this technique is problematic. When the K20D has a manual lens mounted, it automatically switches to center-weighted metering, so spot metering isn't possible, nor is matrix metering.

There are work-arounds, involving either M(anual) mode or the AE-L (exposure lock) button. If you can get close to the subject, take an exposure straight off them, excluding the sun or backlight. If you can't close on the subject, take the exposure off something the same tone value; I may use my skin or clothing. Back when I used simple film cameras with center-weighted metering, for badly-lit dynamic subjects I'd just aim the camera at the ground around me and take the exposure off that.

QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
If you can't repeat the effect with your Pentax, it may be the lens coatings.
Some things Canons are actually good for.
HAH! Or maybe a Holga OPTICAL LENS 50/5.6 will do the trick, eh?
08-07-2010, 01:55 PM   #13
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you cannot autofocus straight into the sun so you'll have to hide from the sun, focus and right before you shoot move your camera straight into the sun and shoot.. I hope that makes sense. LOL
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