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12-03-2006, 09:43 AM   #1
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please help.... tips for bad handshake

Hi all
I have a neurological condition that requires me to be on medication (prednisone) and I get the hand shakes, which makes taking pics difficult
I was looking for any tips and how to hand hold the camera better, without the use of tripods, monopods, bean bags, etc.

any tips much appreciated

anyone else have this problem?

thanks

12-03-2006, 09:51 AM   #2
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Slipchuck,
Have you tried your wifes K100?
I would think the SR system should help.
-Alan
12-03-2006, 10:11 AM   #3
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Tips for Handshake with the K10D

QuoteOriginally posted by slipchuck Quote
Hi all
I have a neurological condition that requires me to be on medication (prednisone) and I get the hand shakes, which makes taking pics difficult
I was looking for any tips and how to hand hold the camera better, without the use of tripods, monopods, bean bags, etc.

any tips much appreciated

anyone else have this problem?

thanks
Assuming you have the K10D, my single best suggestion is to get the D-BG2 Grip. It gives extra weight, which increases the inertia of the camera, and provides more surface area so you can optimally position your fingers.

I have also found that if I push in, towards the camera with both hands, my stability tends to be increased. [Here the grip also proves very useful]. I make my face the third bracing point, with moderate pressure against it.

And most importantly, practice. I do indoor shots of my printer, seeing how sharp I can get the Epson insignia, at increasing Tv's. Sooner or later you will find a style that fits in well for YOU, BEFORE that once in a lifetime shot.

Finally, a sharp picture becomes the perfect excuse for ramping up that exercise schedule, barring any medical contraindication.

Take a look at a thread on handshake and the K10D to which I have posted, on the "other" forum. I think you will be impressed, and inspired.

K10D and SR: it's insane! [Page 1]: Pentax SLR Talk Forum: Digital Photography Review

BTW, I too have a medical problem that affects my hands, which is why I have focused on the handshake issue.

Larry
12-03-2006, 11:33 AM   #4
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I dont have the problem - sorry to hear about it.
But I do have a reputation for being able to handhold at low shutter speeds even without SR.
The technique in principle is the same as for rifle shooting which I won a few cups for in my youth. Its about bracing and breathing.
Bracing: Keep your legs apart and place the left foot in front of the right to stabilise the body, much like a karate expert about to throw a punch. This naturally pushes the left arm forward where it can take all the weigth of the camera from the bottom of the body or lens. The camera should be stable even without the right hand.
Tuck your elbows into your ribs so the weight is not on the shoulders, and then by pressing the camera to the face to provide a third stability point.
Dont hold the camera too firmly by the grip - support as much of the weight as possible on the left hand and use the right more to keep it straight. Be conscious of isolating the trigger finger from the palm on your right hand - move your finger on its own rather than contracting the hand.

Breathing: most recommend breathing out as you shoot, but I tend to breath out half way till the diaphragm is relaxed - hold as I squeeze the shutter - then complete the outbreath.

Also get used to the shutter release so you can reliably fire with a minimal finger movement.

It all sounds a bit involved but actually its pretty logical.

12-03-2006, 02:42 PM   #5
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All good techniques even if someone is not bothered by handshake. Thanks for the info.
12-03-2006, 04:08 PM   #6
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This comes up quite often from my backpacking buddies who don't want to carry tripods and monopods into the backcountry in addition to their DSLRs because of the weight.

I know you said you didn't want any outside accessory, but perhaps you might consider the following for those extra shaky days. Kirk Enterprises makes this thing called a strap-pod. It's just a simple strap that attaches on one end to the camera, and you stabilize the camera by stepping on the other end and pulling it taut. They want $30 US for it, but for about $3 US of 1 inch tubular webbing and some hardware ($4 US) from REI (or MEC for the Canadians) you can make your own. My father has made one that attaches to the strap lugs on his camera on both sides with some tiny snap links. He can lengthen it to step on the loop that hangs down, or shorten it for use while sitting in a chair.

It's far lighter than a bean pod or anything else, and it might be a good trick for you to have in your bag.
12-03-2006, 05:46 PM   #7
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u know....observing some i dont know....newbies i guess or new to slr's (digi or not) I have noticed the lot of them just plain dont know how to hold an slr....

I was taught, and also read that one must cup the lens and as what every one else has posted basically putting ur elbows close to ur body, and bracing the camera against ur face, etc, etc, etc...to have a stable base....

i have been noticing a lot of ppl grabbing..i guess instead of cupping the lens, thus creating less stablity..(especially for the longer zooms)...

i have seen some old school manual shooters doing the latter, their old school...

again..I go back to basics....the very basic nature of photography.....stuff thats not really covered in any manual and very hardly covered in websites....

just my thoughts
12-03-2006, 08:10 PM   #8
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Practice!

Another shooter here. Steve covered the basics and he gives good advice. The only thing I would add comes from shooting a handgun instead of a rifle, but it holds true for any activity where you need to steady an object you are holding.
Practice, practice, and practice some more.
Your body 'learns' by repetition and I think if you develop a basic stance and then repeat it over and over and over you will notice a definite improvement in your stability. This needs to be concentrated practice to do the most good. Think each step through and concentrate, you might be pleasently surprised, I hope so.
To give you an idea of how your body learns, NOVA had a show years ago that had a segment on shooting a .22 target rifle by a member of a college rifle team. This guy had been shooting for years using the same stance, the same procedure for every shot. They did an EKG on him as he went through his practice and discovered his heart stopped beating just as he pulled the trigger. Every time. Your body can learn.
Best of luck.
Frank

12-04-2006, 04:42 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by cencrunner Quote
Another shooter here. Steve covered the basics and he gives good advice. The only thing I would add comes from shooting a handgun instead of a rifle, but it holds true for any activity where you need to steady an object you are holding.
Practice, practice, and practice some more.
Your body 'learns' by repetition and I think if you develop a basic stance and then repeat it over and over and over you will notice a definite improvement in your stability. This needs to be concentrated practice to do the most good. Think each step through and concentrate, you might be pleasently surprised, I hope so.
To give you an idea of how your body learns, NOVA had a show years ago that had a segment on shooting a .22 target rifle by a member of a college rifle team. This guy had been shooting for years using the same stance, the same procedure for every shot. They did an EKG on him as he went through his practice and discovered his heart stopped beating just as he pulled the trigger. Every time. Your body can learn.
Best of luck.
Frank
Unfortunately he could only shoot if they had a crash team standing by to get it beating again....(only kidding)...
12-04-2006, 05:01 AM   #10
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I saw on the net a few times regarding shoulder mount for camera support with long telephoto lens, like this:



I also read some photography books talking about using your own hands to form a "support" formation for the camera body to rest on: Left hand holding onto right shoulder with the camera body on the left forearm...

If it is an essential tremur, beta blocker would help. I take it to slow myself down... :P
12-04-2006, 08:47 AM   #11
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Thank you everyone so far for all the tips. they are greatly appreciated.
I am going to read them in detail and see which works best for me.

thanks

cheers

randy
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