Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
10-02-2007, 08:43 PM   #1
Inactive Account




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Toowoomba - Australia
Posts: 110
What I learnt from my first wedding shoot

What I learnt from my first wedding shoot - this applies only to me, with the gear I used.

1. You need at least 2 photogs to do it well - one to be on the bride (makeup,hair, getting ready etc.) and one to be on the groom (same reason) - because bride and groom normally get ready at different locations.

2. Don't rely on being able to recover shots just because they get shot in DNG. Use spot/center weighted metering - and/or bracket for the critical shots.

3. Unless you're shooting for another photog, just shoot JPEG for everything - all with defaults - sharpen when PP - only photogs notice (real people simply can't tell teh difference), and it makes PP much simpler.

4. Work on your personality - if you can get people to open up/warm to you, they'll give you a better face and pose to capture.

5. When in lens doubt, default to the zoom - the portrait's going to miss too much while you run up or run away - and things happen so fast it's scary.

6. Bounce flash everything in the church. Don't get arty, just get the shots - you can get arty once you've nailed all the key shots.

7. Scout the location, at the same time of day, as you'll be shooting the wedding. Get a feel for the light and the environment.

8. Enjoy what you're doing, it'll show through in your work.

9. Never do it again :-)

Just my experience (super limited though it is).

10-02-2007, 09:09 PM   #2
Pentaxian
Arjay Bee's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Bamaga, QLD
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,057
I did a wedding on the week end on my own too.

No.4 above is really a good one - but also be assertive when necessary as the bride doesn't always know what is best for the shot. Be ready to move the whole party away from having picturesque sunsets as a backdrop if it is going to cause everyone to be silhouettes even with fill flash.
10-02-2007, 09:28 PM   #3
Ari
Site Supporter
Ari's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Freehold, NJ
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 794
Ugh! I have my first "gig" in a few weeks - a portfolio tasting for my company (we're a wine and spirits brokerage house-most of it wiil be candid but pose-able). Almost everything you've said has been going through my head like a nightmare! Glad to hear I'm not out of my mind at least!
Thank you for the tips, though-some of them sound like very practial things to do-
10-03-2007, 03:22 AM   #4
Inactive Account




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Sault Ste Marie, Ont, Canada.
Posts: 563
It took me 4 weddings to work myself up to number 9.

My biggest problem was that I only had a 50mm lens that could be considered fast. Everything else I had started at f/4 and worked them selves up. This was not a problem on those weddings that didn't mind a flash, but the second to last one...no flash allowed. This necessitated reenactments after the ceremony to get those shots.

So one of your rules should also state....

You must have fast glass.

10-03-2007, 04:18 AM   #5
Veteran Member




Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Virginia Beach VA USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,364
It's not easy, is it. I've done a few weddings years ago (late 70s early 80s). I don't anymore. Your observations are quite true (Although I did not own zooms back then, so number 5 was not an option).
10-03-2007, 05:27 AM   #6
Pentaxian
Lowell Goudge's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Toronto
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 15,400
QuoteOriginally posted by 123K10D Quote
What I learnt from my first wedding shoot - this applies only to me, with the gear I used.

1. You need at least 2 photogs to do it well - one to be on the bride (makeup,hair, getting ready etc.) and one to be on the groom (same reason) - because bride and groom normally get ready at different locations.

2. Don't rely on being able to recover shots just because they get shot in DNG. Use spot/center weighted metering - and/or bracket for the critical shots.

3. Unless you're shooting for another photog, just shoot JPEG for everything - all with defaults - sharpen when PP - only photogs notice (real people simply can't tell teh difference), and it makes PP much simpler.

4. Work on your personality - if you can get people to open up/warm to you, they'll give you a better face and pose to capture.

5. When in lens doubt, default to the zoom - the portrait's going to miss too much while you run up or run away - and things happen so fast it's scary.

6. Bounce flash everything in the church. Don't get arty, just get the shots - you can get arty once you've nailed all the key shots.

7. Scout the location, at the same time of day, as you'll be shooting the wedding. Get a feel for the light and the environment.

8. Enjoy what you're doing, it'll show through in your work.

9. Never do it again :-)

Just my experience (super limited though it is).
Although I personally followed #9 I can add 10 and 11

10. Make sure you know the bride's entire wardrobe. Vail, flowers etc, my only shoot had the bride forgetting her flowers in some shots.

11. Don't let the relitives get to you. Dhey will drive you nuts
10-03-2007, 11:14 AM   #7
Veteran Member




Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Virginia Beach VA USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,364
Just thought of #12.
Something I never had to deal with...
12. don't let the wedding planner get to you. Especially if you are shooting in place of one of her preferred photographer. She'll cause no end of misery.
10-03-2007, 11:45 AM   #8
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 426
Just a comment to #3, as I have a different take on it.

I still shot RAW on the wedding I did. Even if your clients can't tell, I think it's part of being as professional as possible, meaning give them the best of what you can do. Having the knowledge to do good post processing work gives one a great edge in the industry. Consistent white balance for a scene, the extra clarity for enlargements, exposure adjsutment to get the lighting just right, etc.

#4 + 8: Personality is a big one, been to weddings where the photographer looked frustrated just being there. Her pictures reflected her feelings as the artistic touch flew out the window, the longer into the wedding, the more snapshot her pictures looked.

10-03-2007, 04:26 PM   #9
Pentaxian
Moderator Emeritus




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Edmonton Alberta, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 10,648
I love this thread. I'd agree with all 1-12 suggestions and would add
13) (how did I get number 13!!) have a second body with another lens and setup the same as the main camera.

I had a shoot several years ago that if it could go wrong then it did. In my camera bag was a spare Olympus Stylus 35mm camera. So I'm happily shooting away with my Super program and the camera just dies. The battery was fine etc and the camera shop never could figure out what happened. So I resort to my trusty K1000, the backup. Well I load the second roll of film and the film winder jams (turned out it was a defective roll of film inside the can and the camera was fine had I calmed down and removed that roll). Holy crap we're only half way through the shoot. Remembered that the Olympus was in the bottom of the bag. That little camera saved my bacon and took some great shots.

So that brings up rule 14
14) take a deep breath. Have a drink. Relax. Shoot a few rolls (or 100 + Digital images) take another drink. Relax more. 100 shots and another drink. Get a friend to drive you home
10-04-2007, 12:50 AM   #10
PDL
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Woodinville, WA USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,175
The last weddings I shot were back in the 70's (I did not tell people for years that I did that sort of thing). I gave the negatives to the couples as my wedding gift. So here is my input.

a. Do not get drunk.
b. Do not eat so much you get sick.
c. Get everything in writing - including flow times
d. Get paid - at least 50% before the ceremony.
e. Get paid for pre wedding meetings - part of your overall fee.
f. Be there on time and be able to be dressed accordingly - tee shirt, tennis shoes and torn blue jeans -=> bad bad bad
g. Ask who in the family is divorced, on the warpath. Do not get people who can not stand each other together.
h. Find grandparents and get their images.
i. Talk to the priest/rabi/justice and venue "owner" about possible restrictions on photgraphy.
j. Know where the restroom is.
k. Get a checklist - here is a start Wedding Photography Checklist: A List of "Must Take" Wedding Photography Shots
l. plus everything mentioned above.

PDL - the elitist
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
bride, camera, dslr, groom, learnt, people, photography, photogs, pp, shots, wedding
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
20 things I learnt on my first paid fashion shoot clark Photographic Technique 7 08-19-2010 11:46 AM
First Wedding Shoot Timtast1c Post Your Photos! 7 07-06-2009 01:52 PM
wedding shoot vincentgargano Photographic Technique 15 05-06-2008 07:04 AM
A few from my first wedding shoot. NLAlston Post Your Photos! 9 08-14-2007 03:42 PM
First Wedding Shoot qdoan Post Your Photos! 8 08-14-2007 02:15 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:56 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top