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02-13-2011, 01:25 AM   #1
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Can dust removal at start-up create extra wear?

I just got a K10D off the marketplace . Seeing how much effort my brother has to put in to clone out the dust on his *ist Ds' sensor, I checked the "dust removal at start-up" box on my K10's options. Will this cause extra wear/harm if I turn my camera on/off a lot? It's probably less usage of the sensor moving bits than using shake reduction for a couple shot, right?

02-13-2011, 03:48 AM - 1 Like   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by FlannelSpoon Quote
I just got a K10D off the marketplace . Seeing how much effort my brother has to put in to clone out the dust on his *ist Ds' sensor, I checked the "dust removal at start-up" box on my K10's options. Will this cause extra wear/harm if I turn my camera on/off a lot? It's probably less usage of the sensor moving bits than using shake reduction for a couple shot, right?
I think it stands to reason that any extra action of that nature forced upon the camera will not only accelerate wear and potential failure, but also chews extra battery power.

So the question really comes down to: Is it worth it? Meaning does the function actually give good results in return.
That's of course debatable, but in my estimations and experience with the inbuilt dust wobbler/repositioner; I think I'd prefer to drink a bottle of Old Jeb's 1850's Genuine Cough Elixer and Elbow Liniment - made from 100% reptile lubricant. The one that's also guaranteed to relieve backache, and help remove corns on toes.

Other's here might advise you differently as to its effectiveness. (especially about the corns. )

OK, nuff sed on that.
What's more intriguing from your post is your brother's chosen methods to "clone out dust". I presume you mean by some laborious after-the-event expensive and complex software exercise. True?
If so then may I ask has he considered curing the source of the disease, instead of continuing to put band-aids on it?

Yep I do mean simply clean the camera's sensor once in a while and be done with it! No dirty sensor can reasonably be expected to produce its clearest and sharpest images when dusty.
Just like we routinely clean the dust off our glasses to see more clearly.

Difficult job? No way! Aside from what the doomsayers claim, it's a surprisingly easy, and very safe exercise with the usual basic care and common sense, plus the right "tool" for the job.
Camera shops charge the proverbial pound of flesh for a sensor clean too, free money for giving your DSLR less care and TLC that you would.

Take test shots of a clear sky, or large sheet of non-shiny very light coloured cardboard or a smooth wall, with lens stopped down to around f/22 or more.
(I find it useful to aim at a small mark or object top or bottom left/right corner in the capture, to have some orientation reference to target for the cleaning.)
The dirt and spots will be positionally opposite to the test image, because the sensor image is inverted.

Here's some suggested modern product that does work, not from Old Jeb though:
1. Everyone's giotta have a good blower;
Giottos blower - Adorama.com
They will shift more loose dusty stuff than the inbuilt shaker will and are fun to squeeze.

2. If that didn't make it spotless, use a "Dry" method stick cleaner, such as;
a) 39357 Pentax Image Sensor Cleaning Kit, O-ICK1
Or less expensive,
b) Eyelead Sensor Cleaning Kit SCK-1 Dust-sticking Bar & Cleaning Papers| MaxSaver.Net (hvStar)

3. Last resort only and standby for the really stubborn crud, a "Wet" method system. There are many elaborate-named and expensive ones, but this Kit here should get equal results and not break the bank;
Eyelead Swabs & Fluid Sensor Cleaning Kit Classic SFSCK-1 C | MaxSaver.Net Camera Accessories

4. Other gimmicks that work like a battery powered tickling feather (giggle giggle...) that appear to belong in a certain other industry and cost the GDP of a small country. We all need those.
(Look up Arctic Butterfly on Youtube and promise not to laugh too much.)

(Fwiw I think the Maxsaver stuff is on eBay too.)

HTH.

.R. -- Self taught camera sensor maintainer.

Last edited by Hypocorism; 02-13-2011 at 04:53 AM.
02-13-2011, 04:10 AM   #3
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I have no basis or reasoning why "dust removal at start up" would cause anymore wear and tear than normal usage but I can say that I think it is very unnecessary. Dust removal rarely ever works for me. 99% of the time it does not remove the dust from my sensor and I have to use a blower. So to me the risk of the extra wear and tear is not worth the very marginal benefit (if any at all).
02-13-2011, 04:28 AM   #4
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No, having dust removal at start-up will not cause extra wear or battery drain.
Since yours is a used K10D you should be more worried of the shutter count. One known issue with K10Ds with very high shutter count is the AF accuracy could be off. The mirror of the K10D and K20D rests on a single support. Over time and repeated use, the mirror is ever so slightly misaligned as will the secondary mirror that is linked to the AF module. This will affect AF accuracy over time. Perhaps that's why with the K-7 and K-5, the mirror now rests on two points.

02-13-2011, 03:32 PM   #5
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Thanks for the response. The camera only has ~13,600 shutter actuations, so I am going to put mirror/shutter issues in the back of my mind for a very long time. In my short experience the dust removal has done its job. I've done the stop-down bright light dust finding method a couple times and it appears spotless. Personally, I'll leave it on as I haven't heard any horror stories of sensors fall apart due to over dust removal/shake reduction.
02-13-2011, 04:57 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Hypocorism Quote
and are fun to squeeze.
Too right! Squeeze squeeze squeeze.

Seriously these things are incredibly useful, not just for photography either. Want to get dust out of your laptop heatsink? Squeeze squeeze squeeze. How about all those crumbs from under your keyboard keys. Squeeze squeeze squeeze.
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