Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
02-26-2011, 09:21 AM   #1
Forum Member
dwhopson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 76
What did we do before EXIF data?

Just an observation...but...

What did we do before EXIF data on digital cameras. We get all this information about a photo: date, time, focal length, f/stop, shutter, etc... It is something we don't really think about now since it's always there.

I was looking through a bunch of older photos (about 10 years old) shot with my ZX-m. I was trying to see which photos were shot with a 28mm lens vs a 50mm lens. Usually, it's fairly apparent; however there are several shots that are questionable. I was thinking how easy it would be just to look at EXIF data for this...but alas there is none for film shots. (I'm actually looking at pics from a 28mm lens to determine if a DA21, though not quite as wide on a DSLR, would be wide enough for me.)

We are so spoiled.

02-26-2011, 09:26 AM   #2
Loyal Site Supporter
blackcloudbrew's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cotati, California USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,782
TELL me about it. I've been shooting film lately and I so miss this information. I have to write it all down, if I remember to. Spoiled, perhaps, but it's become essential.
02-26-2011, 09:30 AM   #3
Veteran Member
Northern Soul's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: The North of England
Photos: Albums
Posts: 491
If you were organised you wrote it down.

I'm clearing our spare room as I type (well, I'm having a coffee now, but you know what I mean) and have just found a photography book from the 1980's, and am shocked how poor the pictures are - we forget how much better photography has become since we have the chance to learn from our mistakes as we make them, as well as later by studying the EXIF.

Whether one uses digital or not, I think it has definitely raised the bar in terms of quality of results.
02-26-2011, 09:36 AM   #4
Site Supporter
boriscleto's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Liverpool, NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 12,295
Backs for the Pentax K-Mount Bodies

02-26-2011, 09:38 AM   #5
Pentaxian
bdery's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Quebec city, Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,657
The solution was to carry a log book. And try to guess which lens you used if you changed often. You also could not know at exactly what focal length you were using your zoom.
02-26-2011, 10:09 AM   #6
Pentaxian
Wheatfield's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The wheatfields of Canada
Posts: 10,043
You carried a notebook.
Or, you just took pictures.
02-26-2011, 10:23 AM   #7
hcc
Pentaxian
hcc's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,482
+1 with earlier posts.

You had a logbook and wrote when and where your took each photo.

You developed rapidly your photos.

Once developed and printed, you wrote with a pencil the details at the back of the back of the photographs.

For completeness, in the 1990s, the APS film came in and it added some information at the back of the printed photographs. It was an improvement. I used the APS films for about 5 years before I moved to digital.

Last edited by hcc; 02-26-2011 at 10:29 AM.
02-26-2011, 10:25 AM   #8
Forum Member
dwhopson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 76
Original Poster
My ZX-m was light years better with exposure compared to my old Sears/Richo auto-exposure camera that only had an AV mode and didn't have a manual exposure mode. It wouldn't have mattered much about keeping notes.

The pictures I'm referring to from 10 years ago are from a trip to Amsterdam. Seems like I was switching lenses constantly. Again, notes probably wouldn't have been helpful/accurate.

My other trips abroad have been with other cameras. Montreal was with a Nikon APS SLR (that was a waste of money...thank goodness it was on close-out). Berlin was on my first digital camera, a compact Olympus 3.1mp with short zoom. Still one of my favorite cameras, though smart-media will be the death of it.

Sorry...a little off-topic here...

02-26-2011, 10:26 AM   #9
Site Supporter
GeneV's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Albuquerque NM
Photos: Albums
Posts: 9,761
We learned to read our own writing. I have lots of little 3x5 notebooks with scrawl in them.
02-26-2011, 10:31 AM   #10
Banned




Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alberta
Posts: 218
QuoteOriginally posted by dwhopson Quote
Just an observation...but...

What did we do before EXIF data on digital cameras. We get all this information about a photo: date, time, focal length, f/stop, shutter, etc... It is something we don't really think about now since it's always there.

I was looking through a bunch of older photos (about 10 years old) shot with my ZX-m. I was trying to see which photos were shot with a 28mm lens vs a 50mm lens. Usually, it's fairly apparent; however there are several shots that are questionable. I was thinking how easy it would be just to look at EXIF data for this...but alas there is none for film shots. (I'm actually looking at pics from a 28mm lens to determine if a DA21, though not quite as wide on a DSLR, would be wide enough for me.)

We are so spoiled.
I always used digital data back M for my super program and also with my ME Super with supplied cord,still use it,being digital it is not outdated.
02-26-2011, 10:32 AM   #11
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 535
I've been shooting for four decades, and I consider all that EXIF information and instant review to be the greatest advancements of digital over film.
I used to take notes, but they never were as accurate or extensive as the EXIF info.
If one pays attention to these two aspects, they can learn more about photography in a year than I did in the first two or three decades.
All the auto functions, however, I believe hinder a deeper understanding of how a camera works, and I still contend that the best way to learn photography is to put everything on manual (including focus) until one really learns to dance with the light. This, too, can be learned on a more profound level much quicker because of EXIF files and instant review.
02-26-2011, 03:34 PM   #12
Senior Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Posts: 167
EXIF is definitely a great help. Not only can't I read some of my old Log Book entries, but also have difficulty matching them to the photos & slides. Additionally, too many times I either didn't have the time or didn't take the time to record my shots.
EXIF is so great as a trouble-shooting and learning tool.
02-26-2011, 07:22 PM   #13
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Central Kentucky
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,415
QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
You carried a notebook.
Or, you just took pictures.

+1. I always lost the darn notes before I got the prints back. Or could not match the notes to the roll in question.

Somehow I don't think it matters a lot. It was good or not and even a youg frog manages to hop without bumping sooner or later.
02-26-2011, 08:00 PM   #14
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
Yes, notes. My father had it easy, before 35mm. He used just one fixed-lens camera at a time. First a 6x9 Kodak folder (I don't know what lens), then an Argoflex-E TLR with a 75/4.5 lens, then a Minolta Autocord with a 75/3.5 lens. He shot Verichrome Pan film with a yellow filter. He took notes for every shot: date, time, place, distance, meter reading, aperture, shutter. One focal length; one ASA (ISO); one filter. That simplifies things a bit.

Then he got a MInolta SRT-101 and a few lenses, and he started shooting Kodacolor; and he stopped taking notes and doing his own developing; and his photography went down the tubes. Let this be a lesson: KEEP IT SIMPLE. All this modern complexity just ruins things. And do your own lab work.
02-26-2011, 09:06 PM   #15
Pentaxian
reeftool's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upstate New York
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 8,009
I couldn't afford lenses for a long time so guessing which lens I used wasn't an issue. I had a 55/2 Super Tak, the kit lens that came with the SP1000. I had a 2x converter and extension tubes. I tried to keep a log book but I'm not an very organized person and for most of my shots, I don't remember. Most of my slides have the dates they were processed either stamped or printed on the cardboard mount. The rolls I got developed by Kodak will say Ektachrome or Kodachrome on the slide. Stuff from the drug store doesn't.

The APS film actually recorded the exposure data on a magnetic strip and that info was printed on the back of your prints. It recorded aperture, shutter speed, date and time. I bought a Nikon Pronea 6i, probably not my best decision but the features of recording data, the 3 different aspect ratio sizes, and the ability to change film mid roll was something I liked at the time. Digital came along and killed APS and now all film is becoming a niche market.

I always stuck with a couple of films that I got my best results from. Tri-x in B&W, Ektachrome 64 and Kodacolor 100. Later, I used Kodacolor 400.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
28mm, camera, data, dslr, exif, lens, photography, photos, shot, shots
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
exif data oldmower Site Suggestions and Help 5 02-24-2011 04:47 PM
EXIF data - how to see it please? Nass Pentax DSLR Discussion 7 09-04-2009 05:10 PM
EXIF data Rykoh Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 1 12-27-2008 01:33 PM
EXIF Data deludel Pentax DSLR Discussion 3 11-13-2008 11:15 AM
EXIF data Camera lucida Photographic Technique 26 10-10-2008 11:47 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:11 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top