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06-26-2011, 07:06 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by deejjjaaaa Quote
M9/its lenses are FF and hardly big... FF != big FF dSLR a-la C&N... can be mirrorless FF w/ lenses smaller because of the smaller registration distance (excluding big tele of course, but then those tele for APS-C dSLR are not small either)

The M9 is $7,000, that's body only, and the least expensive lens I saw for it was $1,400 not much of a comparison if you ask me... For a little more, you could get a D3X Nikon...

06-26-2011, 08:52 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by mhaws Quote
...
So about FF. I have never handled a FF. I am recently getting really obsessed with photography and want to become a professional portrait photographer (doing environmental portraits), but it seems all the photographers whose work I admire use a Nikon D700 or a Canon DmkII (usually the later) ... I figure it's the DOF capabilities that they would want a FF for, right? I really am not sure WHY, just that I want to be like them and that's what they use, hahaha. I wouldn't buy one right away obviously with such little knowledge and experience, but I wondered if switching to Cannon or Nikon would be better for me if that's what I would eventually want (and I dont know if it is?) Do you get my train of thought?
.

If you don't know why you'd want a FF system, odds are you don't really want a FF system.

I think paid portraiture can be done very well with just about any aps-c system and good lenses - more than enough DOF control is available at the focal lengths and distances to subjects you'd typically use for portraiture.

I think FF makes much more sense for a wedding or event photographer, where the fastest AF-lock and very best low-light performance is crucial. If you're doing that kind of work, a D700 or D3S probably brings you a best-in-industry keeper ratio.

For non-pros, it make sense if you're shooting fast-moving subjects in low-light a lot, you like the larger viewfinders, or you enjoy the most DOF control available. But again, it can't do anything APS-C cameras like the K-5 can't do, it just tends to make it easier on you. And not all FF bodies are equally well-suited to your intended application.

(Note that things like fast AF lock has nothing inherently to do with the FF format - it just usually comes with the package.)

Then there's price, and size. FF bodies start at $2000 (Sony A850,) and go up to about $7500 (Nikon D3x.) Many of the lenses are very expensive - and large - but not all. If you shop carefully and are willing to buy used, you can put together a FF kit that doesn't cost too much more than a top-of-the-line aps-c kit.

My advice would be to shoot with your camera, really get to know it, and think about an upgrade to a K-5 (or FF body) only after you really have seen some limitations with what you have. Also keep in mind that very, very few people need a FF body - its almost always really about want.


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06-27-2011, 10:08 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by jsherman999 Quote
I think FF makes much more sense for a wedding or event photographer, where the fastest AF-lock and very best low-light performance is crucial. If you're doing that kind of work, a D700 or D3S probably brings you a best-in-industry keeper ratio
I would really like to be a birth photographer. The lighting in these situations is really dark. I also like doing in home portrait sessions with natural light. Also, I heard the 5dmkII has focusing issues....hmmm

I really don't need one now...I'm just wondering if some day I will really want one and have to sell all my pentax gear to switch brands. That would be expensive and more difficult than building up a lens kit now that would be compatible with the future camera "of my dreams". But I may never want one, who knows.

QuoteOriginally posted by jsherman999 Quote
For non-pros, it make sense if you're shooting fast-moving subjects in low-light a lot, you like the larger viewfinders, or you enjoy the most DOF control available. But again, it can't do anything APS-C cameras like the K-5 can't do, it just tends to make it easier on you. And not all FF bodies are equally well-suited to your intended application.
Kids, birth, homes, natural light....fast moving and low light, so maybe that's why all the photogs I follow use them. What do you mean a K-5 can't do anything a FF can't do? Doesn't "easier on you" mean more better pictures because you aren't struggling to see what is being captured through the view finder? (not arguing, just learning and curious, FYI) I know the thing I need the MOST right now is practice, I'm just wanting to plan most efficiently for the future. I probly should rent one some time.

PS thanks for helping me understand the advantages etc.
06-28-2011, 09:36 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by mhaws Quote
I also like doing in home portrait sessions with natural light.
The problem with natural light is that you can't control it. Sometimes it's there and it's perfect, sometimes it's there but it isn't perfect, sometimes it isn't there at all. So if you want to do home portrait sessions whether for pay or for fun, and you want to do those sessions at the times of your choice, I would urge you to learn how to use off-camera flash. It's a lot easier to control the light than it is to let the light control you.

But, that's just my opinion.

06-28-2011, 08:47 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by mhaws Quote
Honestly I am just starting to think about this and haven't done my research, but I have the k-x right now. It's hard to see through the view finder, and the focus points take to long to toggle through. It would be nice to be able to see the focus points show in screen so that I can quickly change them without having to look down at my screen. Also so that I can be sure of my focus since it is so hard for me to see through the tiny viewfinder and be able to tell for sure if it got exactly the right spot focused.

This is probly a hashed question, but when I searched the question only seemed to be asked years ago....Does Pentax plan to make a full frame camera? (please don't start a debate on FF or bash me for even considering wanting one.... I just want to know if there is speculation that they would be making one?)
First, let me say I am completely happy to do 99% of my shooting from 17mm to 135mm on FF. If I shot a lot of telephoto stuff, APS-c would be more attractive.

It was the viewfinders for APS-c which eventually drove me to Full Frame. However, once I arrove in FF land, many new pleasant surprises were waiting. I loved shooting my K20d for 3 years, but feel much more love for my FF body. I bought a KPS 1.35 magnifier for the K20d, and a split prism, but never got close to happy. Now the KPS is on the D700=happiness.

If I were you I would actually do the research, but I also would get my hands on a FF body and shoot for a while. The Canon 5d Mk2 weighs about what my K20d weighs, and the D700 is not a lot more. Heck, I used to shoot a 440 gram Tamron 2.8 zoom on the K20d, so now when I mount a fast Nikkor prime, like the 50mm 1.8, my FF setup is lighter than my APS-C was. If weight were the determining factor, I would have stayed with my Point & Shoot. Sure, you can get even heavier 2.8 zooms for the FF camera (24-70 f/2.8 Nikkor to name one) but my point is there is no need to.

--I would ask this same quesion in a Full Frame forum and read those responses too

--Not many people need a FF camera, but not many people need a crop sensor camera either. Buying an expensive camera/lens setup is not usually about needs.

--There is an expression in FF land---"The worst glass on FF looks better than the best glass on APS-c."
06-29-2011, 08:32 AM   #21
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Jewelltrail, I really appreciate your POV, thank you for sharing. I'll def rent one out.
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