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10-04-2011, 05:39 PM   #1
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K7 and/or K5 recomposing and the use of the AE-L

Maybe this should have been in the "Beginners" section, but I will ask here anyway ...

When focusing and then recomposing for a shot, while still holding the shutter button half-way, do you use the AE-L button or do you link the AE to the AF (Custom settings for both the K7/K5) before taking the shot(s)?

Yeah ... now that I am thinking about it, this should really be in the Beginners section.

JP

10-04-2011, 05:57 PM   #2
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well I did/do use AE-L in moviemode, and only very sparce used it for stills.
10-04-2011, 06:17 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by RonHendriks1966 Quote
well I did/do use AE-L in moviemode, and only very sparce used it for stills.
Hi Ron,

I see what you mean, but when you'd recompose for a still shot (if you ever recompose), would you just push the AE-L button for that single shot ?

Silly question but I just want to clarify a few things.

JP
10-04-2011, 07:27 PM   #4
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My answer: neither I use M mode. Seems more straightforward to have to hit a button to *change* exposure than to hit a button to *not* change it.

10-04-2011, 08:05 PM   #5
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I don't link AE to AF since I (usually) want to meter the scene when composed for the final image. I use center AF only so i almost always have to recompose after locking focus.
10-04-2011, 11:15 PM   #6
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I mostly shoot MF with CIF or hyperfocus / zone focus now, where I don't recompose much. When shooting AF, I'll usually (lazily) have AF and AE linked. To recompose, I'll use the AF button to lock focus before shooting. If I'm being more careful, I'll meter in M. If shooting a series under consistent light, I'll stay in M with a fixed exposure, and MF or AF or recompose as needed. It all depends.
10-05-2011, 12:13 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
My answer: neither I use M mode. Seems more straightforward to have to hit a button to *change* exposure than to hit a button to *not* change it.
Quite straightforward indeed.

JP
10-05-2011, 12:21 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ole Quote
I don't link AE to AF since I (usually) want to meter the scene when composed for the final image. I use center AF only so i almost always have to recompose after locking focus.
I use centre AF too.

But, if you have to recompose after locking focus, wouldn't the exposure change while doing so?
Say you focus-lock on a bright object with centre focus, then recompose ... wouldn't that change the exposure unless you hit the AE Lock too ?

I am not sure whether I am explaining myself clearly here.

10-05-2011, 05:46 PM   #9
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You are correct, the exposure changes when I recompose and that is what I want. In the rare case where I want to lock exposure when focusing (rather than in for the final composition) I just hit the AE-L button.
10-06-2011, 11:57 AM   #10
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I use AE-L with this spot metering technique. It's very quick and effective.
10-06-2011, 12:04 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Eruditass Quote
I use AE-L with this spot metering technique. It's very quick and effective.
I got to the link which says:

•Spot meter on your white point, this is the section of the scene you want to be nearly blown out. Ignore specular reflections as they are typically many times brighter and don't contain useful detail. You should let those clip
•Set exposure lock
•Set your EV compensation to +X.X EV (Typically 2 or 3 EV) to push that metered gray point to the white point


Re: the last sentence ... wouldn't it be better to set the EV (=2 to+3EV) before hitting the AE-L ?

Another thing: I'd be worried about overexposure even when using spot metering. What's this about the white point?

JP
10-06-2011, 12:05 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ole Quote
You are correct, the exposure changes when I recompose and that is what I want. In the rare case where I want to lock exposure when focusing (rather than in for the final composition) I just hit the AE-L button.
OK, got it!

Thanks.

JP
10-07-2011, 10:40 AM - 1 Like   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by jpzk Quote
I got to the link which says:

•Spot meter on your white point, this is the section of the scene you want to be nearly blown out. Ignore specular reflections as they are typically many times brighter and don't contain useful detail. You should let those clip
•Set exposure lock
•Set your EV compensation to +X.X EV (Typically 2 or 3 EV) to push that metered gray point to the white point


Re: the last sentence ... wouldn't it be better to set the EV (=2 to+3EV) before hitting the AE-L ?

Another thing: I'd be worried about overexposure even when using spot metering. What's this about the white point?

JP
The order doesn't really matter, but yes, it might be a tad easier to set the EV compensation first just because you won't have to do it again for other shots.

This method protects from blowing out whites, unlike every other exposure mode which can be fooled. In many high contrast scenes, matrix/center weighted blow out much of the highlights.

You select what in your picture you want to be white/almost clipped but doing the spot meter on it and saying that spot is +3 EV. You can do the same method by selecting what you want to be gray, or dark, but white is the most sensible especially for digital sensors with the clipping point.

The point is to tell the camera what you want to be clipped. The answer may be nothing at all, or anything brighter than this spot (e.g. you don't care about the detail in a specular reflection).

It's basically what people mean by ETTR (with emphasis on protecting highlights).
10-13-2011, 07:36 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Eruditass Quote
The order doesn't really matter, but yes, it might be a tad easier to set the EV compensation first just because you won't have to do it again for other shots.

This method protects from blowing out whites, unlike every other exposure mode which can be fooled. In many high contrast scenes, matrix/center weighted blow out much of the highlights.

You select what in your picture you want to be white/almost clipped but doing the spot meter on it and saying that spot is +3 EV. You can do the same method by selecting what you want to be gray, or dark, but white is the most sensible especially for digital sensors with the clipping point.

The point is to tell the camera what you want to be clipped. The answer may be nothing at all, or anything brighter than this spot (e.g. you don't care about the detail in a specular reflection).

It's basically what people mean by ETTR (with emphasis on protecting highlights).
"You select what in your picture you want to be white/almost clipped but doing the spot meter on it and saying that spot is +3 EV."

OK, that makes more sense now, sort of.
I'll give it a go.
Would that be a good method to use when exposing in snowy conditions? ... something we have tons of here in the winter.

JP
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