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04-06-2012, 02:37 AM   #31
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Are you still trying to use it with your 70-300mm @300mm+macro mode (which causes more extension)? Because that will be too much magnification for most handheld stuff. Try pulling it back to about 200mm, without the macro mode, and you'll be much closer to the usual 1:1 ratio. You'll also get sharper results, as these cheap zooms go soft at the long end quite dramatically.

Also, you'll need to shoot at a much smaller aperture than you would normally. f./16 through f./22 is perfectly normal for this. Diffraction? Maybe a little, but the gain to DoF is worth it.

04-06-2012, 05:42 AM   #32
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Thanks for the tip. I'll definitely try it. BTW, any thoughts on using tripod plus macro rail/slider? Cheers.
04-06-2012, 05:50 AM   #33
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I've done a bit with tripods, and it's a pain for live subjects. I don't have rails yet, they're still on my list of stuff to buy. Someone else will be able to give you better info on those.
04-06-2012, 06:38 AM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by el baroda Quote
Thanks for the tip. I'll definitely try it. BTW, any thoughts on using tripod plus macro rail/slider? Cheers.
inexpensive focusing rails are very useful for macro work on a tripod because it is difficult to make small position adjustments by moving a whole tripod.

04-06-2012, 07:53 AM   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by el baroda Quote
G'day, mates. I did some more test shots today and found it almost impossible to get a decent photo. The working distance (yes, it's 8") is too short for photographing insects and the depth of field is too shallow.
Welcome to the wonderful world of macro, where all working distances are inconvenient and all DOFs are too thin. Did you bother to freeze your insects first so they wouldn't run away? A focusing rail will help with immobile|dead subjects, and you can work with focus-stacking for thicker DOF.
04-06-2012, 08:07 AM   #36
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RR said:

Welcome to the wonderful world of macro, where all working distances are inconvenient and all DOFs are too thin.

04-07-2012, 07:07 PM   #37
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Hi. Here are my first decent 1:1 macros. Pentax K7, Tamron 18-200mm @200mm, Raynox 150, on-board flash. Photos have been resized for easy upload. Thanks for your tips. Furthter comments and suggestions most welcome.

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04-08-2012, 12:14 AM   #38
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Good stuff. I like the head-on shot of the butterfly. I'm surprised you're able to use the pop-up flash with a lens that long and not get shadowing.

One thing you might want to consider is a diffuser for it. There are lots of DIY solutions, ranging from paper boxes that sit over it, to a cut clear film canister over the flash itself. I've experimented with these with decent results, but lately I've switched to a commercial one. You can find lots of cheap ones on Ebay, like this, and they work quite well. They're a knockoff of the Gary Fong ones, just $2 instead of $30. This kind works fine, too, but they're a bit more of a hassle to attach. The upside is, they fold flat and fit in a pocket easily. You could also make something very similar, yourself.

I tell ya, I have no idea how the Chinese can sell these things for $2 shipped and make any profit at all. It's nuts.

04-08-2012, 02:13 PM   #39
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I also used my external flash on bracket but the results were not as consistent as when I was shooting with my Tamron 70-300mm. I can't understand why. Thanks for the tip on the on-board diffuser. Will get one. Happy Easter, mate.
04-09-2012, 09:25 PM   #40
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Over the weekend I was trying to take a macro shot. Well I dont know if you can call it that because basically I didnt know what I was doing. I just turned on the switch to the macro side on my tammy and started shooting an insect @ 180mm @ f/8.

Needless to say the fly was very small. what did I leave out?
04-09-2012, 09:28 PM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
Welcome to the wonderful world of macro, where all working distances are inconvenient and all DOFs are too thin. Did you bother to freeze your insects first so they wouldn't run away? A focusing rail will help with immobile|dead subjects, and you can work with focus-stacking for thicker DOF.
This is exactly how I have been think of starting macro photography.

In the dead of winter you can hardly come across any insect.

So you basically have to kill them to shoot them.
04-10-2012, 04:50 AM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by Culture Quote
Over the weekend I was trying to take a macro shot. Well I dont know if you can call it that because basically I didnt know what I was doing. I just turned on the switch to the macro side on my tammy and started shooting an insect @ 180mm @ f/8.

Needless to say the fly was very small. what did I leave out?
For maximum magnification, you need to set the zoom to 300mm. I would also suggest you forget about auto-focus. Put the camera in manual focus mode and adjust focus to minimum distance. Move your torso back and forth to get the right focal plane. Manual focus is almost universally used for macro shooting.

If you have enough light, or can add light, apertures smaller than f/8 are generally preferred for insects, to get more than the head in focus.

Last edited by audiobomber; 04-10-2012 at 05:16 AM.
04-10-2012, 06:48 AM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
Did you bother to freeze your insects first so they wouldn't run away?
Hi, sorry for my newbie question but how do you do this ?
04-10-2012, 11:06 AM   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by NickLarsson Quote
QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico:
Did you bother to freeze your insects first so they wouldn't run away?
Hi, sorry for my newbie question but how do you do this ?
1) Capture arthropod(s)
2) Place bugs in container
3) Place container in freezer
4) Wait awhile
04-10-2012, 11:16 PM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by audiobomber Quote
For maximum magnification, you need to set the zoom to 300mm. I would also suggest you forget about auto-focus. Put the camera in manual focus mode and adjust focus to minimum distance. Move your torso back and forth to get the right focal plane. Manual focus is almost universally used for macro shooting.

If you have enough light, or can add light, apertures smaller than f/8 are generally preferred for insects, to get more than the head in focus.
I will try this out and see. But I thought it was best to stay away from the far end of the focal length.
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