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01-13-2008, 10:30 PM   #1
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What's the point of the Green Button?

I know what it does, but what's the point? Someone educate me, please.

01-13-2008, 10:40 PM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by herzzreh Quote
I know what it does, but what's the point? Someone educate me, please.
It's the button you use when you allow your 7 year old to take a photo. Set the camera to all the green settings and cross your fingers. It shuts off any number of useful functions. It's the setting I don't use.
01-13-2008, 10:48 PM   #3
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It can also be quite valuable if you are using a manual lens without an "A" setting. You can manually set the aperature on your manual lens, hit the green button and it will stop down your lens to that aperature allowing the light meter to correctly work with the aperature size you choose.
01-13-2008, 10:53 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by herzzreh Quote
I know what it does, but what's the point? Someone educate me, please.
Either you don't really know what green button does or I don't understand your question.

Green button does a few useful functions: sets exposure in M, P modes, sets ISO to Auto... So what's the point to have that? Well, the point is the same as for any other button of the camera better camera usability.

QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
It's the button you use when you allow your 7 year old to take a photo. Set the camera to all the green settings and cross your fingers. It shuts off any number of useful functions. It's the setting I don't use.
Aren't you writing about green mode?

01-13-2008, 11:00 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by herzzreh Quote
I know what it does, but what's the point? Someone educate me, please.
Ahhh the green button... such a great little with more than one use.

The intended use is the quickly reset the camera to automatic exposure settings.

In other words if you're in any mode besides GREEN like for instance Av (Aperture Priority mode) and you're messing around with the aperture and all of sudden you see a deer walk up near you. Crunch time!!!! So you have a choice, either scroll the rear e-dial to select a proper aperture and make sure the shutter is fast enough for your lens or point the camera at the deer, lock focus, hit the green button and then fire the shot? I hope you chose hitting the green button over the other one because it'll make sure to get the proper exposure for your camera based on the length of your lens and the light available. It won't change ISO unfortunately unless you have it in AUTO ISO.

While in Manual mode it will also set the shutter and aperture for you, but when using an older manual focus lens it will allow the camera to check the metering and set the settings for you and let ya fire away.

Hope that helps you out a little.
01-13-2008, 11:07 PM   #6
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There is no green button...that is if you took the blue pill. If you took the red pill, you stay in wonderland and I show you how deep the rabbit-hole goes.
01-13-2008, 11:39 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
It's the button you use when you allow your 7 year old to take a photo. Set the camera to all the green settings and cross your fingers. It shuts off any number of useful functions. It's the setting I don't use.
Oops! I read green mode rather than green button. As others have correctly posted, it can be convenient, such as to return to your program line from a Hyper-Program shift. I have my program line generally set to MTF, so I often shift off the line with the edials, and the green button does a quick return for me.
01-14-2008, 07:55 AM   #8
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I use the green button for 2 purposes.

My typical mode of shooting is manual exposure, even with the newest of lenses.

What I do is as follows,

I pick a neutrak grey surface (paved road, tree trunk, gravel road, what ever is available) only because I can't be bothered to find the grey card I once owned.

I usually shoot spot metering, and I meter by pressing the green button to set the exposure. Essentually I am using the camera as a reflected light meter.

With manual lenses, the camera stops the lens down, and then meters the resulting light, and sets the shutter accordingly. This is theory, in practice, for some reason, (and especially with fast primes) the K10D gets it wrong (but my *istD is perfect). SO take a shot and use the histogram to confirm metering and where you want the surface you just metered from to be in the histogram.

For AE lenses, you do the same thing, and the camera will follow one of several options (you have to set this upin the menu) I use the option that retains apature and readjusts shutter for exposure.

This allows you to start thinking like a photographer, when you check exposure in a scene, you can spot meter the shadows, sunlit areas etc and then decide for your self where you want the exposure set. In high contrast scenes this is quite useful.

One thing I wish the green button did was have a 4th option to just turn the meter on, but not change anything, in that way you could make lore use of it. Preseltly (especially manual lenses) the only way to meter without changing anything is by using the DOF preview. (on the power switch)

01-14-2008, 08:58 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
Oops! I read green mode rather than green button. As others have correctly posted, it can be convenient, such as to return to your program line from a Hyper-Program shift. I have my program line generally set to MTF, so I often shift off the line with the edials, and the green button does a quick return for me.
Beware Albert, it may fool you that MTF setting. Only the lenses the camera knows will do that, FAs,Fs, DAs,. With A,K,M lenses the program doesn't know which lens it is to set the aperture per MTF .
01-14-2008, 09:02 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
Oops! I read green mode rather than green button. As others have correctly posted, it can be convenient, such as to return to your program line from a Hyper-Program shift. I have my program line generally set to MTF, so I often shift off the line with the edials, and the green button does a quick return for me.
It does seem rather a wasted spot on the dial -- I wish it could also function as a second USER mode.
01-14-2008, 04:50 PM   #11
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I think many folks are confusing the "Green Button" (the button next to the shutter release button) with the "Green Mode" (a position on the mode dial).

The green button does everything that Lowell Goudge and Codiac2600 explained above.

I shoot mostly with old Primes so I can tell you I use the green button the most of ANY button on the camera with the exception of the shutter release.
01-14-2008, 05:03 PM   #12
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Speaking of the green button. I just recd my K10D about 3 1/2 weeks ago, and have found metering M lenses very hit and miss using the green button in manual mode. At f4-f5.6 it seems to do well, below f4 it seems to underexpose, and above f5.6 it seems to overexpose. the higher the f stop, the more pronounced the overexposure. Is this common with the K10D? I also have a K110D and use the AE-L button to do the same thing with M lenses, and it seems to be much better at metering with the old glass.
01-14-2008, 05:14 PM   #13
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Yup. That was the first thing I noticed, particularly when shooting wide open. Our K100D Super is MUCH better at it (though from all I've read here, it still has some issues). I've found that using spot metering instead of center weighted seems to help.... other than that I just anticipate it and usually I'm cranking the shutter open a bit more already.

It's not the end of the world but hopefully they can fix it with a firmware update sometime. Dunno.
01-14-2008, 06:27 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Stratman Quote
Speaking of the green button. I just recd my K10D about 3 1/2 weeks ago, and have found metering M lenses very hit and miss using the green button in manual mode. At f4-f5.6 it seems to do well, below f4 it seems to underexpose, and above f5.6 it seems to overexpose. the higher the f stop, the more pronounced the overexposure. Is this common with the K10D? I also have a K110D and use the AE-L button to do the same thing with M lenses, and it seems to be much better at metering with the old glass.
It's not hit and miss but quite systematic.

with very fast lenses (F1.4 50mm K moount for example),. it under exposes wide open, gets exposure right by F2.8 and then tends towards over exposure up to F11 where it starts going back a little.

Starts at -1 stop at F1.4 and +1.5 stops at F11, to +.75 at F22.

Other lenses all do similar behavor but each one is a little different.

I mapped all mine out by taking a sequence of shots of a block wall in even sunlight, and then measuring the grey scale.

With contrast set neutral on jpeg conversion each 45 is 1 stop between the range 25 and 230 approximately.

By comparison my *istD is so consistent across the entire apature range that if it was an EKG the paitent would be dead. Not even a ripple.

Fortunately, I use my manual lenses most on the *istD and automatic lenses on the K10D.
01-14-2008, 06:44 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
if it was an EKG the paitent would be dead.

What a horrible, horrible metaphor

Pretty much, the green button is "instant green mode" in most cases.
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