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05-07-2012, 07:34 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by D0n Quote
I don't wish to limit the discussion.
I factor my own human behaviour into my process. I use a tripod as often as possible... by keeping the SR off I never forget to turn it off before mounting the camera onto a tripod... it's really that simple for me. SR is something I resort to when needed, and since it's only needed in lower light, environments where you want lower iso and slower shutter speeds.... and the tripod is too cumbersome... I rarely use it.
in fact... I'll use flash in those conditions before turning on SR.

boils down to habits, I guess...
To get the full benefit of the tripod, switch to mirror-lock up, timer delay or remote trigger (you can get a generic IR remote for less than $10) and the SR goes off anyway.

05-07-2012, 07:47 PM   #17
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Getting into the habit of turning it off above shutter speeds of 1/640s or so when shooting sports, and whenever panning (had a few photos ruined thanks to it being on).
05-07-2012, 07:57 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by vonBaloney Quote
To get the full benefit of the tripod, switch to mirror-lock up, timer delay or remote trigger (you can get a generic IR remote for less than $10) and the SR goes off anyway.
depends on what your shooting... I shoot a lot of stills and video... and often don't bother with the remote...
05-07-2012, 08:44 PM   #19
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I'm ambivalent when it comes to SR. I'm attracted to wild nature themes (birds, animals, butterflies, flowers, etc) in situ. Critters are always naturally on the go, spooked by a shadow, or if stationary, blown by a breeze. SR will not stop their movement.

Early on I felt a need for SR, but eventually came to the conclusion that it tended to give me a false sense of self confidence and encouraged sloppy technique. Using good technique when the subject allows it, I can hand-hold the K-5 steady down to about 1/25th of a second. Anyway, my default is SR=OFF in TAv mode with ISO set to 'Auto (80-25600).' I rarely shoot slower than 1/400. Knowing SR is OFF, but available if needed, seems to work best for me.

Cheers...


Last edited by Michaelina2; 05-08-2012 at 12:55 PM.
05-08-2012, 04:26 AM   #20
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generally OFF, so that I don't forget about it and have it ON when using a flash... which usually ends up in double images...
05-08-2012, 04:53 AM   #21
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I think there is a point when SR ruins the shots. I didn't understand why I got shaky frames at speeds like 1/400, 1/1250, but reading a K-5 review here, I now know.

Before taking a shot, you need to wait for a short time for the SR to "arm itself", which is indicated by the hand symbol in the viewfinder. Then take the shot. Shots taken before this point are shaky, regardless of the shutter speed, I guess. I do a lot of street photography, and most times I just focus and shoot, not waiting for the SR blink.

I don't know, this may need common confirmation but this might be a point where SR ruins a shot.
05-08-2012, 05:16 AM   #22
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when on a tripod
when i'm certain of 1/250 or better shutter speed, and want to shoot quickly (like shooting streets as above)
macro
05-08-2012, 05:46 AM   #23
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What does it look like when SR "ruins" a shot? Can someone show me an example? I've always just left
SR on, handheld, monopod, panning, fast or slow shutter, you name it. Except video on a tripod I think.

Can SR really ruin a shot if you don't give it time to stabilise?

Regards,
--Anders.

05-08-2012, 06:01 AM   #24
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SR should not ruin a photo if you shot to quick, in those situation it just turns off. It can however ruin a shot if you let it "arm" and then make a sudden movement and fire, there is no way for the SR to know if that movement was deliberate or a "shake" so chances are that it will guess wrong. Therefore I turn off SR during quick action photography and panning.
05-08-2012, 06:19 AM   #25
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These might just exhibit my point. I'm not blaming the camera, I am willing to blame myself

Three examples and three crops of them.

1/400






1/500






1/200






you might "view" the images on a separate browser tab, they will be fullsize.

Last edited by Crosshair; 05-08-2012 at 06:28 AM.
05-08-2012, 06:26 AM   #26
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If one uses SR when taking pics on board a small private aircraft or perhaps a speed boat; then you might very well be causing some issues with the camera.

I'd prefer not to take the chance on that one - I'd switch it off for examples such as those mentioned.
05-08-2012, 07:04 AM   #27
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For me it is also the question, when to turn it on. I have it almost always turned. Just when i am getting into low shutterspeeds, will I turn it on. Or if I am in an awkward position to take the shot. Other than that it is off. With my 35mm prime, I can get to 1/15th and get a sharp shot without shake. below that, I will turn it on
05-08-2012, 08:59 AM   #28
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I tend to leave it on and I have to say that the " causes trouble on a tripod if not on delay etc" does not seem to be always true.

I have forgotten more than once to switch it off and have not had a problem, and I have deliberately tried both on and off with a finger actuation and don't see the difference.

I am I blind or is every one going on hearsay?

I understand on image stabilisers that are in lenses that it definitely causes problems from colleagues who have canikon equipment.
05-08-2012, 09:41 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by Michaelina2 Quote
I'm ambivalent when it comes to SR. I'm attracted to wild nature themes (birds, animals, butterflies, flowers, etc) in situ. Critters are always naturally on the go, spooked by a shadows, or if stationary, blown by a breeze. SR will not stop their movement.

Early on I felt a need for SR, but eventually came to the conclusion that it tended to give me a false sense of self confidence and encouraged sloppy technique. Using good technique when the subject allows it, I can hand-hold the K-5 steady down to about 1/25th of a second. Anyway, my default is SR=OFF in TAv mode with ISO set to 'Auto (80-25600).' I rarely shoot slower than 1/400. Knowing SR is OFF, but available if needed, seems to work best for me.
I'm not sure I understand these comments -- SR has nothing to do with subject motion -- it is supposed to minimize (counter-act) the vibrations that are inherent in a person trying to hold a camera stationary in air with their hands. So whether your subject is a skittish critter or a brick wall or even if you left the lens cap on, SR will behave the same. Now if you are moving the camera here and there, following the critters, etc, that might make a difference due to the "arming" issue, but I take shots of critters all the time and it hasn't been a problem. So if you can hand-hold it steady down to 1/125, having SR on doesn't *hurt* in any way -- it will make that 1/125 steadier still. It isn't like you are required to use a lower shutter speed, nor do I see how it encourages poor technique -- it simply gives you more flexibility. But often lowering the shutter speed isn't a direction you want to go for other reasons (moving critters) so you're not *encouraged* to do anything lazy. But when there is less light and your subject allows it, you can use a lower shutter and still get a good shot.

I really don't see why there is resistance to it beyond issues of it not working or ruining shots it should have made better, but I just haven't seen any such problems. If I'm shooting handheld, then it is turned on. I haven't found a downside, even when panning, following birds in flight, etc. I do think it is better without it on a tripod if everything is rock-solid, but in a breeze when even the tripod is vibrating a bit it could help there as well. The only other time I turn it off is when because of limitations in the camera software I am unable to enter the correct focal length -- for instance when using a modern lens that reports its focal length to the camera, it you are using pass-thru teleconverter or a close-up adapter on the lens, there is no way to adjust the focal length to what it ought to be without blocking pins or something so it thinks it is a manual lens (and then you lose other features). Using a manual zoom would also be a big pain cause you'd have to change the focal length all the time so easier to turn it off. (That's a pet peeve of mine -- you should be able to manually set the focal length anytime, not just for SR, but so EXIF data will be correct.)
05-08-2012, 09:55 AM   #30
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it consumes power... can cause image blur under some circumstances, the most frequent cause is when a user snaps the shutter (esp with shutter priority release) before the green hand signals it's ready... but there was a debate sometime back in another Pentax forum where some people (me, I started that thread if I recall) felt the sr was costing them image sharpness under some very specific circumstances... and others tested it rather thoroughly and one fella concluded he had discovered a bug that locked up his k10 on occasion... when using sr on a tripod.... requiring a battery pull... again very unlikley the sr is gonna cause a problem under nearly ALL normal shooting... and the one area where it did seem to occasionally induce blur... upping the iso and using faster shutter, seemed to avert the problem.. and the blur was minimal, and most likely due to the shutter firing before the SR locked on...
seriously.... it boils down to personal preference...
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