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03-23-2008, 09:55 AM   #16
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QuoteQuote:
Rule of thumb for any camera meter is for snow and beach if sun is shining

Good sunlight average exposure = F16 125s

Thus if you apertured at F11 your shutter speed should read 250sec, F8 500sec etc

We had to learn to see light and know the above permutations in our heads and no live preview etc only bracketing

Alternative meter off dark blue sky or back of hand as quick checks

d

The above exposure settings are for ISO 100.

03-23-2008, 10:00 AM   #17
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well no its probably not blown out but I can say I see any more detail than in the lower in the lower it is easier to see detail, I tried the calibration screen you linked to and on lowest brightness i can see a very slight difference between the two brightest squares (on the lower scale) but its perhaps not as visible as it should be.
03-23-2008, 10:05 AM   #18
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How true

QuoteOriginally posted by benplaut Quote
that will happen with any meter--it tries to take the image and average it out to neutral 18% grey. If there are a disproportionate amount of highlights (high-key), then you have to adjust with EV comp.

see:
Exposing Snow
All meters attempt to make your world grey - they do not see color either only monochrome.

The trick is to learn how to shoot for the highlights expose for them. With digital, you can use the histogram to correct. I always attempt (note the word attempt) to shoot "to the right" - meaning that the peak of a bell shaped exposure curve would be on the right side of the histogram. I shoot digital as if it were slide film. If you blow out the highlights, they are not recoverable (blown highlights on slide film is clear acetate). When I was shooting some snow scenes in the front yard a month or so ago, I was running at about EV +1.5 - that way I could meter off the snow and get usable images.

Shoot to the right:
Expose Right

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03-23-2008, 10:28 AM   #19
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I think the thing is the K's are more like a traditional SLR the sensor is not used to preview there is a dedicated light metering system and it can't analyse the shot we have to instead if you want a pro camera you have to do the work. the P&S and digicams have the sensor always on so they can analyse the scene and help correct things as colour can be seen

03-24-2008, 02:02 PM   #20
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Simon - knowing exposure and what your camera meter is doing is important.

Lets take your signiture photo for example;

With that scene you could set your camera to matrix metering and get a good result - uniform light and no huge diffs between light and dark areas - also colours are neutral

Take the same scene with snow in the foreground instead of neutral green grass-your meter will compensate and try and render the snow a grey while also trying to expose for the church thus giving a faster shutterspeed for given ap - hence your main subject (church) will be 1 stop under exposed

This is where spot metering comes in - by spot metering off the walls or even the blue sky would give a closer more accurate reading - easy to do

My 2cents

D
03-24-2008, 02:13 PM   #21
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yes your right and by the way its not a church its was once a house

I would think that with the cheapness of my old bridge camera the CCD is used for metering as well so in theory (they probably don't bother) it could detect the colours as well as the brightness and better calculate the exsposure but then thats what we could call dummys fool proofness of cheap cameras, we have to think for ourselves that the range of gear we work with

so the typical metering algorithm assumes that the scene is on average grey and calculates brightness on that assumption, if all was black I expect it would be grossly over exposed
03-24-2008, 04:15 PM   #22
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My k10d nearly always underexposes 1/2-2/3 of a stop. Or at least thats typical of how far I have to up exposure in LR for shots I didn't play with exposure comp. I wish there was a global exposure compensation. I'd set it so I'd still have the full +-2ev to play with when I need it.
03-24-2008, 04:47 PM   #23
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When you take pictures of snow or sand scene, you should take along a gray card. You meter off the gray card, freeze the reading (AE-L), then you take the picture. Perfect exposure every time.

03-24-2008, 04:51 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by simons-photography Quote
Well I've taken a few shots with my K10D, Ive noticed that especially where there is a lot of light say snow or a sky shot the metering is a good 1 stop lower than it should. if its say ground and sky its ok. its not a serious problem as I check the metering anyhow with a preview and adjust but I'm just wondering why its not as good as my old fuji digicam on manual but then again I didn't get it for good programming but a better quality camera.

I'm using multi segment metering as I don't want any blow outs
I find there's so much variation between multi-segment scene metering, different value measurements for center-weighted average, and so much potential for complex scenes to cause over- or under-exposure in multi-segment or center-weighted mode that I use spot metering most of the time.

You have to pay close attention to what you're metering off of when you use spot, but at least you know what you're metering off of. My experience with Pentax cameras has been that spot metering is accurate and requires no EV compensation as long as you know how to spot meter.

The only exception to that rule was with a K20D review unit that I had for a short while during my review of the K20D. One of the K20D's would consistently underexpose by 2 full stops when using P-TTL flash and spot metering. But that was a faulty K20D body and wasn't typical K20D behavior.

I didn't even mention it in the review since we determined it was a bad unit and not representative of all K20D bodies.

I have also never had any issues with either of my K10D bodies or my old DL.
03-24-2008, 05:22 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by JJJPhoto Quote
I find there's so much variation between multi-segment scene metering, different value measurements for center-weighted average, and so much potential for complex scenes to cause over- or under-exposure in multi-segment or center-weighted mode that I use spot metering most of the time.

You have to pay close attention to what you're metering off of when you use spot, but at least you know what you're metering off of. My experience with Pentax cameras has been that spot metering is accurate and requires no EV compensation as long as you know how to spot meter.

The only exception to that rule was with a K20D review unit that I had for a short while during my review of the K20D. One of the K20D's would consistently underexpose by 2 full stops when using P-TTL flash and spot metering. But that was a faulty K20D body and wasn't typical K20D behavior.

I didn't even mention it in the review since we determined it was a bad unit and not representative of all K20D bodies.

I have also never had any issues with either of my K10D bodies or my old DL.
I have to agree 100% with you, spot meter on what you want to be in the middle of the histogram, do a quick check on the highlights, and shoot. I shoot mostly JPEG, which means that when I look at a scene, I also decide how I want to set the camera's contrast, to get the most out of the photo.
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