Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
06-13-2008, 08:16 AM   #31
Veteran Member
WMBP's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,496
QuoteOriginally posted by deludel Quote
Here's my question: when you talk about "just dial in exposure compensation" ... I assume you are not talking about AV/TV? And, if the k10 DOES underexpose .. how can anyone every use AV/TV accurately? (without PP)
I think you're making this harder than it is.

Many people use the term "exposure compensation" (or "EC") as a synonym for pushing the button labeled +/-. But I think the term can be used more generally so that it simply means pushing a button or turning a dial on the camera to change the exposure slightly from what you would get if you took the picture using the settings suggested by the built-in meter. The camera's meter tells you when your settings give what it expects will be a "correct" exposure. If you disagree with the camera's meter, you're using exposure compensation.

In P, Tv and Av modes, you adjust the metering by using the +/- button. If you're shooting in P mode and, after a test shot, you think the bride's white dress looks a bit washed out, you hold down +/- and dial the exposure UP a bit. Note that, in these modes, the meter is sort of in charge of your settings - you don't actually see the meter here. So when you compensate in P, Tv and Av, in a way what you are doing is biasing the meter one way or the other.

In M (full manual) mode, you get to see the meter and you control everything. Here, when you compensate, you're changing the settings and the result will be that the meter will show the exposure to be off-center. In other words, if this is a nominally correct exposure:

. . . | . . .

then after you slow down the shutter a bit, you might see this:

. . . . | . .

But it's exposure compensation either way, whether you change the settings directly (in M mode) or whether you bias the meter (using +/- in P, Av and Tv mode).

I should add that exposure compensation is what you do when you're taking the photo. But you can adjust the exposure after the fact, in post-processing. There's a cliche for digital photography: EXPOSE FOR THE HIGHLIGHTS, PROCESS FOR THE SHADOWS. It's not a rule, but it is a good rule of thumb. It means, when you take the photo, try not to blow the highlights too badly. Then, when you're processing the photo, do what you can to bring up the detail in the shadows.

QuoteQuote:
Will - what mode are you in when are are talking about compensating?
It should be clear from what I said above that it doesn't matter what mode I was in. I use different modes. Most of my shooting is done in M mode, but I use TAv mode when shooting indoor sports and occasionally I switch to P mode. I think the same way in all three modes - I just know that I have to push different buttons to get the results I want.


QuoteQuote:
Anyway, I am not sure what you meant in the quote above - what feature is more useful than the histogram? Did I miss something?
Yes, you missed the part where I said that the blinkies are more useful than the histogram. By "blinkies" I mean the setting that on the K10D/K20D is found here:

Menu > Playback > Playback display > Bright/Dark area

Turn this on, and when you review a photo, if part of the photo is complete underexposed or overexposed, you'll see it blinking or flashing on and off. On the K20D, blown darks blink yellow, and blown highlights blink red.

The histogram can be a really useful tool, too, but often the histogram tells you both more and less than you really need to know. If the entire shot is seriously over or underexposed, you don't need the histogram to tell you: it will be obvious. But when the exposure is more or less in the ballpark, and if you're still struggling with Exposure 101, you should not be worrying too much about whether the mountain range's peaks are more to the left of center or the right of the center of the histogram. What you should be worrying about is whether you're clipping the highlights and where.

But when I bring up the issue of where the highlights are blown, I come back to the point that the histogram also tells you less than you need to know. The histogram may tell me that I've blown some highlights, but it doesn't tell me which highlights are blown and it is NOT always obvious. I don't panic just because I see some blinking red on review (meaning there's a blown highlight somewhere). What matters to me is WHERE that blown highlight is. A large number of my photos have something blilnking in them. But using the "bright/dark area" indicator, I can tell whether I give a darn or not. If the bride's face or dress is flashing red (meaning that I've blown her face or her dress), well that's very bad. But if there's a little blinking red in the background where the sun is reflecting off the chalice that's on the altar, that's probably ok. especially if my eyes tell me that the rest of the photo is okay.

Getting EVERYTHING exposed properly in the photo is OFTEN not possible. A lot of the scenes that you photograph have a dynamic range that is greater than the camera is capable of capturing. The camera's sensor is like a coffin that comes in just one size: medium. Sometimes you've got a small corpse or a medium-sized corpse that will fit nicely into the coffin. But you're often trying to fit a tall corpse into the medium-sized coffin. Do you cut off the head or the feet? Usually the head is more important, so usually you cut off the feet. Using the "bright/dark area" (blinking blown highlights) feature will help you understand whether you've cut the head or the feet.


QuoteQuote:
Dang it, just when I thought I was getting familiar with this camera! I have no idea what this means .. but will look it up!
Oh, don't feel bad. Photography is a bit like basketball. Shooting a basketball into a basket looks pretty simple, and indeed, it's hard to say much about it. So why is it that the pro players show up early for practice and shoot baskets? It's because there's a LOT more to the game than the theory.

You'll understand the theory soon enough. It ain't really all that complicated. It's actually playing the game that will keep you busy for the rest of your life.

Will

06-13-2008, 08:21 AM   #32
Forum Member




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 91
QuoteOriginally posted by ukbluetooth Quote
All metering is fooled by unusual conditions - snow, sky, sea etc. Then it is necessary to add/subtract compensation. I personally think of exposure compensation as adjusting what the camera is metering on to mid grey - compensating the scene rather than the camera, but that is just my oddball way of looking at things.
+1. Nothing oddball about that way of thinking. It's basic Photography 101. Metering is usually to neutral gray. In fact, they sell gray cards for this purpose.
Sky shots are many stops greater than N gray, so the camera will decrease exposure quite a bit. Grass and flesh tends to be one stop lighter, so again the camera will decrease exposure. That's why so many folks think the camera underexposes outdoor shots.

Since some consumer automatic cameras compensate for this when folks select the "Scenery" mode, people making the transition to a semi pro camera often blame the camera for not doing the adjustment for them. It's not supposed to.

BTW, a little trick to checking exposure is to meter off the palm of your hand if illuminated by the same light source as the subject. Then set your camera one stop less (brighter)

Last edited by rogerstg; 06-13-2008 at 08:29 AM.
06-13-2008, 08:41 AM   #33
Senior Member




Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: ohio
Posts: 247
[QUOTE=deludel;267410]Maybe my settings are different and I don't know?? When I am in AV (just tried it now), the rear e-dial adjusts the f/stop and the front e-dial doesn't do a dang thing! The Exposure Compensation just blinks there right in the middle .. but won't/can't change.


Deludel...Are you holding the exposure compensation button down at the same time you are turning the dial??Bob
06-13-2008, 09:22 AM   #34
Pentaxian




Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Durban, South Africa
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,051
My K10D is set to +0.3 permanantly.

The K10D (well mine) and compared to my friends Canons does underexpose.

Too me it's not like typical underexposure but almost like a thin dark veil over the pic.

If you take a reading off say lush green grass at iso 100 f11 in midday sun - the K10d will meter 125 sec (which is correct) but that veil exists - and the +0.3 generally in all metering modes and with carefull metering, solves the problem

I was recently in snow and had to compensate up to ev +1.5 at times to get the balance I wanted.

Previously I have had many different film cameras and all had metering anomolies - which had to be learned by taking series of pics at the same time - writing all the exposure values down and anylising the pics once developed

Digital makes life a helluva lot easier to get around metering issues.

And just about all digital pics need pp to define the look you want

06-13-2008, 10:17 AM   #35
Pentaxian
Lowell Goudge's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Toronto
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 15,312
QuoteOriginally posted by deludel Quote
Maybe my settings are different and I don't know?? When I am in AV (just tried it now), the rear e-dial adjusts the f/stop and the front e-dial doesn't do a dang thing! The Exposure Compensation just blinks there right in the middle .. but won't/can't change.

Lowell - I took the pic of the white wall in Av (multisegmented metering) with a few diff f/stops ... all histograms showed underexposed. Not sure what the negative value is ... but of the 4 columns in the histogram, it was all in the first one to the left ... but far the the left of that one ...

I'd screenprint it from Elements, but let's just say that computer decided to go on strike this week, and I am still negotiating it's return!!
that does sound under exposed.

You will note jeffkrol indicates what the placing should be in the histogram and also as a grey scale value.

It sounds like the setting is off foe some reason but without a photo posted including EXIF it is hard to tell
06-13-2008, 12:25 PM   #36
Senior Member
deludel's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Durham, CT
Posts: 196
QuoteOriginally posted by egordon99 Quote
Break out your manual. I believe there are custom settings which determines which dials do what in each mode.
That's priority # 1 for tonight! But as you will see below, I think I had the AH-HA moment that answered all this ..

QuoteOriginally posted by jeffkrol Quote
This is a bit crude but you should get the idea.
If your "white wall" shot is averaging anywhere from 90 to 110 then it's pretty well as Pentax designed it. One catch is to be careful that your photo editor isn't applying any presets to the image.
I was checking the histogram right from the k10 .. I'm a little scared of my laptop I use for PP now, it's on the fritz (fortunately, I have everything backed up!) I have to get to the bottom of it this weekend .. Thanks for the tips tho, they will come in handy!

QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
I think you're making this harder than it is.
It's a special trait of mine!

QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
Many people use the term "exposure compensation" (or "EC") as a synonym for pushing the button labeled +/-.

In P, Tv and Av modes, you adjust the metering by using the +/- button.
Ding! Ding! There is my problem! I've primarily only shot in Manual, so "exposure comp" to me means, letting the camera meter for me then using the e-dials to balance the ---|--- bar. Embarrassing as it is, I forgot about the +/- button and never even considered what it is for! I'll be trying this out tonight, but it seems pretty simple.

QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
There's a cliche for digital photography: EXPOSE FOR THE HIGHLIGHTS, PROCESS FOR THE SHADOWS. It's not a rule, but it is a good rule of thumb. It means, when you take the photo, try not to blow the highlights too badly. Then, when you're processing the photo, do what you can to bring up the detail in the shadows.
I just completed a 6-week online course in Elements, and I've learned alot about PP .. but this rule of thumb puts a lot into perspective, so thanks!

QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
Yes, you missed the part where I said that the blinkies are more useful than the histogram. By "blinkies" I mean the setting that on the K10D/K20D is found here: Menu > Playback > Playback display > Bright/Dark area
THANK YOU!

QuoteOriginally posted by robert Quote
Deludel...Are you holding the exposure compensation button down at the same time you are turning the dial??Bob
I will be doing this after this point! Thanks all .. this is a terrific thread with excellent insights. I would not have learned where I was struggling from any manual or book .... I sincerely appreciate it!
06-14-2008, 04:04 AM   #37
Veteran Member




Join Date: May 2007
Location: York Region Canada
Posts: 642
QuoteOriginally posted by dylansalt Quote
My K10D is set to +0.3 permanantly.

The K10D (well mine) and compared to my friends Canons does underexpose.


I was recently in snow and had to compensate up to ev +1.5 at times to get the balance I wanted.

Well that sounds about right. Snow, water and bright sand will fool the meter and under expose.
When shooting snow with film, i would do one of two things.
1-Meter and open up 2 stops.
2-Use a hand meter and shoot those values.

Both worked as they should, bright snow, not gray.

Dave
06-14-2008, 06:25 AM   #38
Veteran Member
Ivan Glisin's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Belgrade/Toronto
Posts: 656
Understanding exposure (and you will say WHAT!!!)

QuoteOriginally posted by madisonphotogrl Quote
I feel that my new K10D is underexposing my outdoor photos my a full 1/2 stop. Is this common? Should I exchange my camera?
No. Your camera is fine.
Here is why is that happening:

1) Take one BLACK and one WHITE t-shirt, towel, blanket, large sheet of paper, anything non-glossy and big enough to fill the frame. No patterns, text, images, nothing. Uniform simple black and white. Find good light, say outdoors or next to the window.

2) Set your camera to "P", everything else on AUTO as well. Metering mode is not important since you will be shooting uniform surface, but select matrix for now.

3) Take one shot of your WHITE then one of BLACK subject. Get close enough to fill the frame. Image does not need to be in focus, since we are testing exposure here, not sharpness. You can turn AF off. In fact, you can defocus to concentrate on light not patterns.

Now look at the results and compare them. What do you see? Would you say that your camera exposes correctly, underexposes or overexposes?

(Warning: you may be unable to answer this question! :-)

06-14-2008, 07:32 AM   #39
Veteran Member
jeffkrol's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Wisconsin USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8,434
QuoteOriginally posted by dylansalt Quote
My K10D is set to +0.3 permanantly.

The K10D (well mine) and compared to my friends Canons does underexpose.



Previously I have had many different film cameras and all had metering anomolies - which had to be learned by taking series of pics at the same time - writing all the exposure values down and anylising the pics once developed

Digital makes life a helluva lot easier to get around metering issues.

And just about all digital pics need pp to define the look you want
You should read this: Bottom line Canon fudges the iso in order to get a hotter exposure without changing f stops/ aperatures..
http://doug.kerr.home.att.net/pumpkin/Exposure_Calibration.pdf
So that leaves Canon with only the possibility of achieving their target
value of Hu/Hsat by using a non-standard rating of ISO sensitivity—a
rating that is about 0.74 that which would be determined under ISO
12232. In other words, the sensitivity that is designated “ISO 100” by
Canon would probably be rated at about ISO 135 under ISO 12232.

or
What about our Canon camera?
As mentioned in Appendix B, we can expect a Canon digital SLR
camera to operate on the basis of an automatic exposure system
calibration consistent with ISO 2721 but with an ISO sensitivity rating
that is about 0.43 stop low compared to a rating under ISO 12232.
If we follow the above guidelines for the use of “gray card” metering,

(referring to this:Often we have available a test target with a nominal reflectance of
18%. In that case, if the scene is photographed with an exposure1
that is 1/2 stop greater than indicated by the automatic exposure
system (such as by setting an exposure bias of +1/2 stop), we will
have the same result described just above.)

it will probably result in an exposure2 for a 100% reflectance object
that is almost 1/2 stop above saturation.
If we wish to avert this possibility for a scene containing
high-reflectance objects, than we should probably meter from a test
target with a reflectance of 18% and use the exposure indicated by
the automatic exposure system “as is”.


Bottom line Canon's exposures will be a half stop "hotter" then Pentax or Nikon for that matter...
Have your friends Canon shoot a "white wall" or grey card. See where the histogram peaks.. if it's dead middle (I would bet)
then the Canon metering is "wrong".... well "not quite correct" is probably a better term.
All these standards have a lot of leeway and fudge room ...

Last edited by jeffkrol; 06-14-2008 at 07:40 AM.
06-14-2008, 08:18 AM   #40
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 1,934
QuoteOriginally posted by jeffkrol Quote
Bottom line Canon's exposures will be a half stop "hotter" then Pentax or Nikon for that matter...
Have your friends Canon shoot a "white wall" or grey card. See where the histogram peaks.. if it's dead middle (I would bet)
then the Canon metering is "wrong".... well "not quite correct" is probably a better term.
All these standards have a lot of leeway and fudge room ...
You can continue to believe in what you imagined and keep saying. But as long as the *reproduced* final pictures are much darker than what our eyes could see and look rather gloomy, it's a *real* problem.

Also, if your claim is valid, all people who just want brighter pictures could add +1/2 or 0.5EV compensation and the problem will go away. Very unfortunately, this just is NOT the case. The errors of a different Pentax lens in use or a different metering mode chosen could just introduce an error of a magnitude more than that.
06-14-2008, 09:50 AM   #41
Veteran Member
jeffkrol's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Wisconsin USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8,434
QuoteOriginally posted by RiceHigh Quote
You can continue to believe in what you imagined and keep saying. But as long as the *reproduced* final pictures are much darker than what our eyes could see and look rather gloomy, it's a *real* problem.

Also, if your claim is valid, all people who just want brighter pictures could add +1/2 or 0.5EV compensation and the problem will go away. Very unfortunately, this just is NOT the case. The errors of a different Pentax lens in use or a different metering mode chosen could just introduce an error of a magnitude more than that.
Can't understand why I even bother with you at all but here goes:
2 images, 1 Canon, 1 Pentax.. very different but not as different as you believe.
Canon's is overexposed to iso standards by 1/ 2 stop..
BUT the biggest difference is in the contrast curve applied to the RAW data. Not an exposure issue at all really.
Slight retraction: contrast is not that much greater but still plays a factor here. That cloud is unfortunate. I've asked you for what, 2 years, to take side by side identical photos using your 5d and k100 so I can see what you keep whining about. I'm sure you are capable of this YET you still refuse to do it. Stick it on your BLOG for all I care.

And again..... if you spot meter off grass (an assumed 18% grey target) you have to dial in 1/2 EV to obtain the correct exposure.. just the way it was built.. no "error" no "failing"
Mr. Kerrs papers and conclusions are non-arguable, though you continue to try:
The iso standards are "updated" for digital....................
ISO 12232-1998 defines the determination of the “ISO speed” (that’s
actually the official term; I prefer to call it the “ISO sensitivity” since
that term seems more apt) for a digital camera sensor system.
That definition, in effect, states:
The ISO sensitivity of a digital camera sensor system is defined
by: S = 78/hsat
where S is the ISO sensitivity and Hsat is the exposure2 (in
lux•seconds) at which the camera delivers the greatest possible
digital output (that is, the saturation value of exposure2).
Note that the ISO sensitivity of different classes of film (prescribed by
other standards) is determined based on a different criterion; one
cannot infer any “saturation” value of H from those ratings.
Putting that all together
If we combine those two definitions, we get the following for a digital
camera whose automatic exposure system is calibrated in accordance
with ISO 2721, when the automatic exposure system has been
correctly advised of the ISO sensitivity of the sensor system as
defined according to the saturation basis of ISO 12232:
If the camera, with automatic exposure control system in effect,
regards a scene of uniform luminance, it should set an exposure1
such that the resulting exposure2 created on the sensor, Hu, will
be:
Hu = 0.128Hsat
where again Hsat is the saturation value of exposure2 for the
sensor system.
It is the achievement of this relationship that is really the underlying

objective of the ISO 2721 calibration standard, although it is never mentioned directly in the standard, but must be discerned by
considering the interaction of that standard with ISO 12232.
Note that we can quantify this relationship by way of the ratio Hu/Hsat:
Hu/Hsat = 0.0128
and that ratio will be a convenient way to describe other results of the
combination of exposure meter calibration and ISO sensitivity rating
we may encounter with regard to digital cameras. We could imagine
this particular relationship being called, in shorthand, “calibration to
12.8%” (although we don’t encourage that usage).
http://doug.kerr.home.att.net/pumpkin/Exposure_Calibration.pdf
http://doug.kerr.home.att.net/pumpkin/ISO_Dynamic_range.pdf

Last edited by jeffkrol; 06-14-2008 at 12:17 PM.
06-15-2008, 07:31 AM   #42
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 1,934
Good post, Jeffkrol. It just show what Canon is far more WYSIWYG than the Pentax and even a dark cloud won't help to increase the exposure level of the shiny parts of your scene, which should look very bright.

As for my comparison shots you suggested/requested, just forget about it. As I am sure to tell you that the Canon's pics are brighter and much closer to my eyes see, this is exactly the same as what you or other Pentaxians have shown us for many times, your conclusion will surely be "Canon has a wrong exposure because it is (made) brighter"(?!) and the Pentax pics are correctly exposed but it has been very obvious that they are look dark/gloomy!?? What a "logic"!

I really don't think I could argue with you further, with your sound knowledge about metering and solid grounds presented. I must admit I have been wrong and also that I don't know how to use my Pentax cameras. That's it and all.
06-15-2008, 08:22 AM   #43
Veteran Member
Stratman's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: St Louis, Missouri U S A
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,464
QuoteOriginally posted by RiceHigh Quote
You can continue to believe in what you imagined and keep saying. But as long as the *reproduced* final pictures are much darker than what our eyes could see and look rather gloomy, it's a *real* problem.

Also, if your claim is valid, all people who just want brighter pictures could add +1/2 or 0.5EV compensation and the problem will go away. Very unfortunately, this just is NOT the case. The errors of a different Pentax lens in use or a different metering mode chosen could just introduce an error of a magnitude more than that.

Please PLEASE just go away.........
06-15-2008, 10:14 AM   #44
Veteran Member
jeffkrol's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Wisconsin USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8,434
QuoteOriginally posted by RiceHigh Quote

As for my comparison shots you suggested/requested, just forget about it.
Hate to stoop this low but.... CHICKEN..
QuoteOriginally posted by RiceHigh Quote
Canon has a wrong exposure because it is (made) brighter"(?!) and the Pentax pics are correctly exposed but it has been very obvious that they are look dark/gloomy!??
Actually you really are the only "dark and gloomy" thing around here.
I've called your "exposure measurebations" on your website to task and showed you why (w/ concrete facts and evidence) your use of a Canon camera to set a baseline as to Pentax's "errors" is COMPLETELY WRONG.....(110 vs 127.5 ie iso fudge) yet to save face all you fall back on is personal opinion and the need to dig up every negative fact about Pentax. At one point in time you actually had some valueable information. Those times are long gone I'm afraid.
QuoteOriginally posted by RiceHigh Quote
I must admit I have been wrong and also that I don't know how to use my Pentax cameras. That's it and all.
you said it, I didn't.
Canon chose to meter one way, Pentax another. Get over it. Sell your bloody Pentax gear and be done with it...to use an old phrase, for you, your beating a dead horse..
Oh by the way, I still doubt your an engineer....
06-16-2008, 06:04 AM   #45
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 1,934
QuoteOriginally posted by jeffkrol Quote
Hate to stoop this low but.... CHICKEN..

Actually you really are the only "dark and gloomy" thing around here.
Well, please behave yourself and respect yourself at the first place, even you don't respect others.

QuoteQuote:
I've called your "exposure measurebations" on your website to task and showed you why (w/ concrete facts and evidence) your use of a Canon camera to set a baseline as to Pentax's "errors" is COMPLETELY WRONG.....(110 vs 127.5 ie iso fudge) yet to save face all you fall back on is personal opinion and the need to dig up every negative fact about Pentax. At one point in time you actually had some valueable information. Those times are long gone I'm afraid.
Not true. My test chart was created using all 128 RGB values and it was calibrated against a Konica Minolta incident light meter, which was calibrated in KM's laboratory and had a calibration certificate issued. For all others who are interested, read:-

http://www.geocities.com/ricehigh/home.html#The_Chart

I have used my test method to check for the exposure accuracy of my MZ-S and the EOS 300D - no problem - they all agreed in general with my chart and the expensive calibrated KM light meter. Most importantly, they *reproduced* the 128 values. So, it must be my Pentax DSLRs that were different, but not *all* others, even including a Pentax film SLR.

QuoteQuote:
Canon chose to meter one way, Pentax another. Get over it. Sell your bloody Pentax gear and be done with it...to use an old phrase, for you, your beating a dead horse..
So, if you like the way that your Pentax DSLR (you still have a *ist D, right?) exposes, fine. I am not beating a dead horse but if people are starting new thread like this one and asking for info, I will surely to share my knowledge and experiences on this issue.

QuoteQuote:
Oh by the way, I still doubt your an engineer....
It is not important anyway, please first re-learn how to first respect yourself and then the others, my humble words.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, dslr, k10d, photography
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
k10D underexposing homestead65 Pentax DSLR Discussion 26 09-09-2010 08:00 AM
77ltd underexposing on k10d kiwao Pentax DSLR Discussion 8 06-09-2010 04:35 AM
EV Problems (Underexposing) w/ DA* 50-135mm montman Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 18 01-16-2010 12:25 PM
K20D Underexposing michael110 Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 16 12-06-2009 12:10 AM
Underexposing lens? zntgrg Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 3 02-06-2008 05:34 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:53 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top