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07-23-2017, 06:31 PM - 1 Like   #3046
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Spectacular shots of the falls, Ray!

Yet another, taken while walking around at sunset with the Tokina AF 28-70:


07-24-2017, 01:50 AM - 5 Likes   #3047
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QuoteOriginally posted by paulh Quote
Spectacular shots of the falls, Ray!

Yet another, taken while walking around at sunset with the Tokina AF 28-70:
Thanks, Paul. Very nice light in that suburban shot.

It was a beautiful winter's day here so I headed for the beach for some wide shots - DA 15mm, Tamron 10-24mm and DA 18-135.
The big swells from yesterday had disappeared completely.





07-24-2017, 09:24 PM - 2 Likes   #3048
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K10D k135 f2.5 @ f8
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07-25-2017, 08:16 PM - 1 Like   #3049
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Tonight's sunset. K10D, DA* 16-50, 9 image merge (SOOC if you must know). Xpst.


Larger image here.

07-26-2017, 01:44 AM - 5 Likes   #3050
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Sea Lion Rock Arch, Oregon
DA* 50-135mm F2.8

07-26-2017, 08:12 AM - 3 Likes   #3051
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Nice work, everyone - keep 'em coming!

A couple from early May with the F35-70:


Our shih-poo Jeannie discovering a new trail:
07-26-2017, 09:36 AM - 1 Like   #3052
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QuoteOriginally posted by paulh Quote
Nice work, everyone - keep 'em coming!

A couple from early May with the F35-70:
That first one looks so tranquil, Paul. Is this close to where you live? You've inspired me. One of these days, I should take out my F35-70 for a spin; I got it with a second-hand K10D camera body but I've never given it a fair work-out yet.
07-26-2017, 01:28 PM - 3 Likes   #3053
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Pentax K10D exposure (in)accuracy?

Before I discovered the K10D about three months ago, the digital body I'd used most was my Sony NEX 3N mirrorless. I hardly ever touched the exposure compensation, the exposures were very reliable, although I often didn't get the kind of look or colours I liked and ended up playing around with presets in LightRoom. This was part of the reason I tried a K10D - I saw people getting lovely colours and a much more pleasing "look", straight out of camera. The other reasons were I wanted a "proper" shaped camera with a viewfinder, but I digress.

I love the K10D and the images I'm getting, mostly with Takumars and a couple of Pentax-A series lenses.

But, with virtually all lenses I use, I'm needing to tweak the exposure with exposure compensation on the camera. I've noticed a general pattern, let's use a Takumar 55/2 for example. I shoot Av.

This is typical for a day with decent sunlight but not scorching bright.

At f/2 (wide open) I need +0.5 exposure comp.
At f/2.8, 0 exp comp.
At f/4, -0.5 exposure comp.
At f/5.6, again -0.5 exp comp.
At f/8, -0.5 or even -1.0 exp comp.

As I rarely use f/8 or above, the pattern is quite simple and now I just set the exp comp after I know what aperture I'll use. I shoot Av with both the Takumars and the A series lenses. So in practice I've worked around it and got used to it. And it's much the same for different lenses - wide open needs -0.5, then every stop down needs 0.5 less.

All exposures are within +/- 1 stop, indeed most of the aperture range I use is within +/- 0.5 stops, so I could just exposure bracketing +/- 0.5 for every shot and pick the best image afterwards. But I don't really like doing this, wherever possible I like to get the shot right in camera. (I don't like spending any time in PP!)

If I was shooting film, I'd just err towards overexposure and the latitude of the film would absorb any minor exposure errors. But I've found exposure with digital is way more sensitive and even half a stop can make a significant visible difference in the final image. I'm no expert, just making a judgement based on my eyes, and the histogram and "blinkies". So I do feel this tweaking is necessary to get the best from the K10D.

Have others experienced this with the exposure meter of the K10D? How do you work around it?

I must say my experience with the 6MP Samsung GX-1S (Pentax *ist DS2 clone) is much the same, but if anything the K10D is a bit more accurate with exposures. But with both I follow the same pattern of exposure comp.

In the meantime, a couple I shot with the K10D and Asahi Super-Takumar 28mm f/3.5. Direct export from RAW to JPEG in LightRoom, no processing.





07-26-2017, 02:19 PM   #3054
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Dan, I also notice a big variance with the exposures in the K10D, even compared to the next model which I used to own (the K20D). My K-S1 is so much better at this. But like you, I have also mostly learned to compensate and to retake shots if needed.
07-26-2017, 02:33 PM   #3055
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dan James Quote
This is typical for a day with decent sunlight but not scorching bright.

At f/2 (wide open) I need +0.5 exposure comp.
At f/2.8, 0 exp comp.
At f/4, -0.5 exposure comp.
At f/5.6, again -0.5 exp comp.
At f/8, -0.5 or even -1.0 exp comp.

Have others experienced this with the exposure meter of the K10D? How do you work around it?
This is quite common behaviour with older lenses. You would get the same problem (perhaps to a lesser extent) on a K-1 or K-3 when using the viewfinder, where the light meter is behind the focusing screen. On those models, you can switch to Live View (equivalent to mirrorless camera operation with metering directly from the sensor) and get more accurate exposure, but of course that's not possible on older models without Live View.

Larger apertures tend to under-expose, and as the aperture closes down, this gradually moves to over-exposure. Trial and error, leading to experience with each lens, will allow you to dial in the right amount of EV compensation at any given aperture.

Last edited by BigMackCam; 07-26-2017 at 02:39 PM.
07-26-2017, 03:00 PM - 1 Like   #3056
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So CCD + Contrasty Lens (Sigma 30 1.4 Art) + Linear Polarizer (old Nikon!) = an explosion of color



07-27-2017, 01:24 AM   #3057
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dan James Quote
I love the K10D and the images I'm getting, mostly with Takumars and a couple of Pentax-A series lenses. But, with virtually all lenses I use, I'm needing to tweak the exposure with exposure compensation on the camera.

As Mike (BigMackCam) says, it's because the exposure meter reads the light transmitted by the focusing screen. A DSLR is understandably designed primarily with modern autofocus lenses in mind, which are all capable of open aperture metering, so the main aim of the focusing screen is to give a bright viewfinder image with the lens wide open. Unfortunately for legacy lens users, the light transmission of DSLR focusing screens is non-linear as you stop down, so stop-down metering will tend to be inaccurate.

My own solution is a combination of Sunny 16 (which is actually Sunny 11 here) and incident metering. If I'm in direct sunlight I use f/11 at 1/125 at ISO100, or a reciprocal. Every photo of mine that you will ever see taken in direct sunlight will have been shot at that exposure with no metering involved, no matter what the time of day or day of the year. If there's no direct sunlight in the frame then I incident meter with my Sekonic L-308S.

I've been in family snapshot mode this week with my sister visiting from New York, so I have actually been trying some through-the-lens metering with the camera's built-in meter, because incident metering seemed like overkill for happysnaps. Results with my Takumars were frustratingly inaccurate in exactly the way that you've described. So then I tried an autofocus zoom with matrix metering for a day, and ended up wanting to bang my head against a wall because I missed far too many shots from being busy fiddling with exposure compensation instead of looking at what was going on in front of me.

So today I'm heading out with the family again, and this time I'm going to keep it simple with a Takumar on the camera and my light meter round my neck. And I don't care if people give me funny looks. I'll know that I've got the correct exposure with no fuss and no effort, and I'll be able to focus on what it's really all about: capturing special moments with the people I love while I've got them here around me.
07-27-2017, 08:27 AM   #3058
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dartmoor Dave Quote
As Mike (BigMackCam) says, it's because the exposure meter reads the light transmitted by the focusing screen. A DSLR is understandably designed primarily with modern autofocus lenses in mind, which are all capable of open aperture metering, so the main aim of the focusing screen is to give a bright viewfinder image with the lens wide open. Unfortunately for legacy lens users, the light transmission of DSLR focusing screens is non-linear as you stop down, so stop-down metering will tend to be inaccurate.

My own solution is a combination of Sunny 16 (which is actually Sunny 11 here) and incident metering. If I'm in direct sunlight I use f/11 at 1/125 at ISO100, or a reciprocal. Every photo of mine that you will ever see taken in direct sunlight will have been shot at that exposure with no metering involved, no matter what the time of day or day of the year. If there's no direct sunlight in the frame then I incident meter with my Sekonic L-308S.

I've been in family snapshot mode this week with my sister visiting from New York, so I have actually been trying some through-the-lens metering with the camera's built-in meter, because incident metering seemed like overkill for happysnaps. Results with my Takumars were frustratingly inaccurate in exactly the way that you've described. So then I tried an autofocus zoom with matrix metering for a day, and ended up wanting to bang my head against a wall because I missed far too many shots from being busy fiddling with exposure compensation instead of looking at what was going on in front of me.

So today I'm heading out with the family again, and this time I'm going to keep it simple with a Takumar on the camera and my light meter round my neck. And I don't care if people give me funny looks. I'll know that I've got the correct exposure with no fuss and no effort, and I'll be able to focus on what it's really all about: capturing special moments with the people I love while I've got them here around me.
...or take the K-S1 for the family snapshots.

...or take the pictures in RAW, I find that I can compensate 2 EVs in exposure or even more with the K10D with no problems if I'm using ISO 100.

But when you get the exposure right, what a joy. This next picture is basically SOOC, just the default loading parameters in RawTherapee. There's a Hoya Linear Polarizer there, so I'm getting closer to getting more stuff when I snap, and less when I do PP



Of course with a bit of PP (less than 5 minutes) a similar shot which didn't look nearly as good SOOC (it was underexposed) looked about just as good, I guess:



Both taken with Tokina 24mm f/2.8 (exactly the same one I suggested to Paul a while back when BHPhoto had it for 49 dollars shipped...) This lens (or the Cosina counterpart) was supposed to keep me happy until I bought a K 24 2.8 again but I no longer feel like I need to spend the money on the Pentax which costs quite a bit more, and this is just as good in its own way

This is the same spot, different position, taken with the Sigma 30 1.4... of course the Sigma picture is better, but it also cost over 16x what I paid for the Tokina (309 vs 19 dollars...) and the Tokina, I think, does hold its own

Here's the Sigma...


Last edited by ChristianRock; 07-27-2017 at 10:30 AM.
07-27-2017, 04:21 PM   #3059
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dartmoor Dave Quote
As Mike (BigMackCam) says, it's because the exposure meter reads the light transmitted by the focusing screen. A DSLR is understandably designed primarily with modern autofocus lenses in mind, which are all capable of open aperture metering, so the main aim of the focusing screen is to give a bright viewfinder image with the lens wide open. Unfortunately for legacy lens users, the light transmission of DSLR focusing screens is non-linear as you stop down, so stop-down metering will tend to be inaccurate.

My own solution is a combination of Sunny 16 (which is actually Sunny 11 here) and incident metering. If I'm in direct sunlight I use f/11 at 1/125 at ISO100, or a reciprocal. Every photo of mine that you will ever see taken in direct sunlight will have been shot at that exposure with no metering involved, no matter what the time of day or day of the year. If there's no direct sunlight in the frame then I incident meter with my Sekonic L-308S.

I've been in family snapshot mode this week with my sister visiting from New York, so I have actually been trying some through-the-lens metering with the camera's built-in meter, because incident metering seemed like overkill for happysnaps. Results with my Takumars were frustratingly inaccurate in exactly the way that you've described. So then I tried an autofocus zoom with matrix metering for a day, and ended up wanting to bang my head against a wall because I missed far too many shots from being busy fiddling with exposure compensation instead of looking at what was going on in front of me.

So today I'm heading out with the family again, and this time I'm going to keep it simple with a Takumar on the camera and my light meter round my neck. And I don't care if people give me funny looks. I'll know that I've got the correct exposure with no fuss and no effort, and I'll be able to focus on what it's really all about: capturing special moments with the people I love while I've got them here around me.
That is a very clear explanation of light metering and I thank you for it, Dave. What you say makes perfect sense (as it usually does!). I had never thought about it quite like that.
I have tried the Sunny f16 rule with my K10D and found that the exposures were under-exposed so I just go with what the camera measures most of the time. Sometimes I make adjustments after looking at the histogram but mostly I adjust exposure in ACR or Lightroom when necessary.
07-28-2017, 08:45 AM - 1 Like   #3060
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QuoteOriginally posted by Orbus Quote
That first one looks so tranquil, Paul. Is this close to where you live? You've inspired me. One of these days, I should take out my F35-70 for a spin; I got it with a second-hand K10D camera body but I've never given it a fair work-out yet.
Thanks! Yes, it's close to home but requires a bit of a hike. I love the F35-70 but my copy seems slightly decentered. I work around this by shooting verticals like these, or using the macro mode. I may pick up another copy if I don't repair it.
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