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11-29-2013, 10:55 PM   #1
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First DSLR k-3 or k-5ii

I have finally decided to make the jump to dslr. I have chosen pentax due to the weather sealing and wr series lenses as well as the limited primes. I was looking at the k-3 and k-5ii but could use some help choosing. Thanks!

11-29-2013, 10:58 PM   #2
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Easy. K-5II while it's $599. The K-3 isn't worth twice as much.
11-29-2013, 11:02 PM   #3
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If you are a DSLR newbie, I don't think you'll see too much of a difference between photos taken with the K5-II and K-3.

Of course, for the price, the K5-II is a great bang for the buck @ $599, just a year ago, it was about the price of the K-3...

Buy the cheaper and invest the money you have left over on a good lens or two is what I say...
11-29-2013, 11:08 PM   #4
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K-5II - it's a photographer's camera. An excellent dSLR and superb value at $599. Cannot recommend it highly enough.

I wouldn't pay full price for the K-3 right now unless I need its new features, like improved video. Wait until this time next year for a good K-3 deal. In the meantime get the K-5II and enjoy a whole new world of photography.

11-29-2013, 11:28 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Werdall360 Quote
I have finally decided to make the jump to dslr. I have chosen pentax due to the weather sealing and wr series lenses as well as the limited primes. I was looking at the k-3 and k-5ii but could use some help choosing. Thanks!
Go for this deal:

Pentax K-5 II Digital SLR Camera 12016 B&H Photo Video

It's a more than enough for a first DSLR. You'll love it

Adam
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11-29-2013, 11:31 PM   #6
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K-5II is a great price now and more than enough camera.
11-30-2013, 12:46 AM   #7
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If you shoot stationary-flowers and landscape then K5, any flavor.
If any action is involved, then I believe the K3 might be the way to go.

Cheers.
11-30-2013, 12:55 AM   #8
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Glass > Body

I vote getting a second hand body and all the glass you can afford.

11-30-2013, 05:31 AM   #9
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I would recommend you a K-30 or K-50 as first DSLR, but there are some amazing deals on the K-5 right now, so you should take advantage of them. The learning curve might be steeper than with mid-tier DSLRs like the K-50, but it has some features that you might use some day. The K-3 would be even harder to use, produces larger files, and there aren't yet many software profiles for it.
Spend the money you saved on the camera to buy a good lens, maybe a fixed focal length lens, one of the limiteds, or the 50-135mm. The K-5II and a high-end lens is basically a pro package. Though, if you want a comfortable zoom range and WR (keep in mind that the lens has to be WR, too, otherwise you still cant go out in rain), maybe try the 18-135mm.
11-30-2013, 08:07 AM   #10
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Werdall, is this going to be your first SLR or just your first digital SLR? In other words, how comfortable are you shooting in manual or semi-manual modes as opposed to shooting on automatic mode or using scene modes? If you are know you way around a camera and how to set proper exposure and depth of field, please ignore the rest of this post.)

To me, the biggest difference between a top of the line camera, like the two you mention, and a middle level or entry level model is that the lower ones allow you to learn how to use an SLR at a slower pace. You can observe how the camera sets up exposure using particular modes as you gain more control over the camera. Learning to use an SLR is a process and you will go much further if you learn how to use with a camera that is suitable to your abilities rather than jumping into the deep end.

Here is my short story: I purchased my first DSLR about 7 years ago. It was Pentax K100d. I was a total novice and purchased several books on photography in general and SLRs in particular. (Whatever you decide to go with, buy and read "Undersgtanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. It will do more for your photography than any camera or lens you will buy.) My father in law bought a K10D at the same time because he wanted the top of the line camera. Fast forward to now. I used a K100d for two or so years until I passed it on to my daughter. I then bought a K20D (fully manual with no scene modes) which I used until earlier this year when I bought a K5II. For the last five or so years I have been 100% manual shooter, shooting a variety of subjects from sports (yes you can shoot sports with Pentax) to portraits. I've acquired a substantial lens collection and photography has been my main hobby. My father in law, who is very technologically savvy, still uses his K10D primarily during family gatherings and in a green mode only. (yes there is an auto mode on all Pentax DSLRs.)

The point of this long explanation is if you know how to use a camera go with either K5II or K3 (personally I would grab the K5II and DA 18-135 at the incredible price B&H is offering). If you are still learning, go for K-50. You will get amazing images and learn how to use an SLR. Your learning process will be a lot smoother and you will avoid the "why is my $$$ camera not taking good photos type of questions.

Good luck and keep us posted on your decision.
Len
11-30-2013, 09:14 AM   #11
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Take a look at the features of all three current camera designs (K-3, K-5 series, K-30/50) and think through how you are likely to use these cameras. For action shooting and external flash, it appears that the K-3 will be better due to AF and flash-related improvements; K-5ii et.al. might be slightly better for landscapes and has a nice quiet shutter; the K-30/50 is a bit loud and not quite as well built as the K-5 or K-3 but is much better for using the live view option and manual shooting which can be a good option for improving your shooting technique - and allows you to spend more on glass which will be more important in the long run.

If you plan to hold on to the camera as your primary shooter for many years, the initial cost difference of the body is less important. If you are building a system for the future, greater emphasis on quality glass is your highest priority. (You tend to keep glass for decades - and they keep their value, bodies come and go.)
11-30-2013, 09:42 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by ScooterMaxi Jim Quote
Take a look at the features of all three current camera designs (K-3, K-5 series, K-30/50) and think through how you are likely to use these cameras. For action shooting and external flash, it appears that the K-3 will be better due to AF and flash-related improvements; K-5ii et.al. might be slightly better for landscapes and has a nice quiet shutter; the K-30/50 is a bit loud and not quite as well built as the K-5 or K-3 but is much better for using the live view option and manual shooting which can be a good option for improving your shooting technique - and allows you to spend more on glass which will be more important in the long run.

If you plan to hold on to the camera as your primary shooter for many years, the initial cost difference of the body is less important. If you are building a system for the future, greater emphasis on quality glass is your highest priority. (You tend to keep glass for decades - and they keep their value, bodies come and go.)
I second this.

Spend the cash on the glass (FA Limited's, can't really go wrong) and try and find a K-5 IIs. I'm terrible at photography but find the combination of K-5 IIs and FA 31 and 77 make my shots look almost professional. Most shots in reasonable light are keepers.

I found through bitter experience that you can spend a lot of money accumulating mediocre lenses thinking you're saving money by cutting such corners when actually it's best just go straight to the finest glass available and perhaps have only two lenses. Pentax-FA 31mm f/1.8 Limited and Pentax-FA 77mm f/1.8 Limited. Depends on what you shoot of course.
11-30-2013, 01:22 PM   #13
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First DSLR k-3 or k-5ii

I disagree with Parry. The FA Limiteds are very expensive. The focal lengths are also better suited for full frame. An iPhone in the hands of a photographer can capture moments that could be considered photographs. You don't need the most expensive glass to get good results.

My suggestion for a first kit would be the 18-55, 55-300, DA 35 and DA 50. All of this glass can be had for less than $1,000. Once you become better at the craft you can explore the more expensive DA and FA Limiteds and DA* glass.

PS: the FA 77 is my favorite, most cherished lens. I try to forget what I paid for it. And I don't pixel peep; it's flaws have gone unnoticed so far.
11-30-2013, 01:24 PM   #14
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It's hard to recommend the FA Limiteds because, frankly, they are overpriced. They have a unique rendering, for sure. They just don't represent a great value IMO.
11-30-2013, 01:26 PM   #15
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To make a long story short, I would choose gear that provides the best bang for the buck while starting out.
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