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03-03-2014, 08:59 AM   #1
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When is a lens too heavy for the camera mount?

Hi,

I just ordered a DA 60 250. This is the heaviest lens I have ever had and I wonder if the camera mount will get damaged if it has to hold up the whole weight of the lens.

What do people think? I have a K-5iis.

Best,

03-03-2014, 09:03 AM   #2
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If it was I think you would see a few more complaints about it here on the forums...

The K-5IIs has a metal lens mount attached to a metal frame. I don't think it'll be much of a problem.
03-03-2014, 09:23 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by maxxxx Quote
Hi,

I just ordered a DA 60 250. This is the heaviest lens I have ever had and I wonder if the camera mount will get damaged if it has to hold up the whole weight of the lens.

What do people think? I have a K-5iis.

Best,

Ignoring drops, etc, that lens will never be too much for your mount.
03-03-2014, 09:38 AM   #4
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The K5II has a metal mount screwed onto a metal body, same with the lens. But what holds the mount is only 5 screws, with fairly large thread and only a few mm long. This is where the strain will be the biggest. Very little side force applied to the front of the lens will translate into a huge amount on the mount. But if you're careful all will be fine.

03-03-2014, 09:41 AM   #5
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This is why these big lenses have their own tripod mounts. You essentially hold the lens, and let the camera hang there.
03-03-2014, 09:43 AM   #6
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Look at it this way: the lens mount only needs to hold the weight of the camera. Any lens significantly heavier than the camera will have its own tripod mount. Handheld, your arms aren't strong enough to damage anything no matter how awkwardly you hold it.

fgaudet's statement is true only if you don't use the tripod mount on the lens.
03-03-2014, 09:45 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by TER-OR Quote
This is why these big lenses have their own tripod mounts. You essentially hold the lens, and let the camera hang there.
Well that's right--even hand-held, you're supporting the lens more than the camera.
03-03-2014, 09:55 AM   #8
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Main thing is to use the lens mount rather than the camera mount when placing on a tripod.
When I walk with long lenses I carry from the lens not the camera.

03-03-2014, 10:01 AM   #9
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With my astrophotos, I've played with the K mount stiffness for a while. In my case, the lens is fully supported, however the camera body is hanging free.

Normally, a loose body is not an issue. In my case, I've added the weight of a cooler onto the body of the camera. I spent a lot of time looking at potential flex issues and found that without supporting the camera body, I could see a shift of 2-3 pixels from a vertical to horizontal position. While this may not seem like much, it would be enough to blur a long exposure, assuming there was a change in vertical orientation.

The source of flex in the mount is not the screws - it's the flat springs inside the bayonet. These must compress to hold the lens in place. Under additional strain, they will allow the sag to happen. This is by design to allow tolerances for the mating surfaces to remain workable as the parts wear and age.
03-03-2014, 10:05 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by crewl1 Quote
Main thing is to use the lens mount rather than the camera mount when placing on a tripod.
When I walk with long lenses I carry from the lens not the camera.
Good idea to carry from the lens. That was my main worry. When taking pictures you probably have to support the lens anyway.
03-03-2014, 10:24 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by smigol Quote
The source of flex in the mount is not the screws - it's the flat springs inside the bayonet. . . . This is by design to allow tolerances for the mating surfaces to remain workable as the parts wear and age.
True, and if you feel it necessary you can carefully shim the lens/body interface to eliminate that very small amount of play.
03-03-2014, 10:25 AM   #12
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In addition to the above comments, the 60-250 is not an especially heavy lens. With good shooting technique you'll be holding the camera grip and supporting the lens with the zoom ring. Handholding this combo is not at all difficult and with a little practice you'll be shooting anything that moves. Enjoy!
03-03-2014, 10:31 AM   #13
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I have two rules regarding what the tripod mount on the camera should or should not be subjected to:
1. If the lens has its own tripod mount (even if just an optional accessory) then you should use that and not the tripod mount on the camera.
2. If it is impossible, or very difficult to hold the camera (with the lens mounted) only by the camera without supporting the lens then I consider it too heavy for the camera.

It is true that the K-3 and K-5 are very sturdy cameras but they are also precision instruments. A hammer can be very tough and almost indestructible but it doesn't know anything about precision. A camera on the other hand does not have to only resist breaking but also maintain its accuracy and precision. Minor distortions invisible to the eye, caused by excessive stresses, could nevertheless be enough to adversely affect the camera.
03-03-2014, 10:52 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by wtlwdwgn Quote
you'll be shooting anything that moves. Enjoy!
I would suggest to be careful with the choice of words here . Especially if it involves airplanes or politicians.
03-03-2014, 10:53 AM   #15
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Please don't take this the wrong way, as I have no idea what your photography experience is, but look here for tips on how to hold a camera properly.

Holding Camera

As someone brought up on manual 35mm SLR's, if shooting by hand I always support the lens/body with my left hand and hold the camera body with my right, as in the example on the left of the middle row.
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