Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
06-06-2014, 05:12 PM   #16
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: East Bay Area
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 784
QuoteOriginally posted by Steve.Ledger Quote
Re: Program Line options

The K-01 nor the K-50's 'P' mode has no Program Line settings as explained above, which seems rather pointless to me because there's already an AUTO setting which does essentially the same thing (unless I've missed something which is possible). Sure you can adjust Av and Tv in P mode, but why not just use Av or Tv in the first place?
The K-5/K3 line definitely have more choices for program line. But in P mode, the camera doesn't remember the Av or Tv you set it to after it wakes up from sleep. So essentially it goes back to point and shoot mode which could be useful if I'm just walking around taking a lot of snap shots that I don't care much about the settings and adjust Av or Tv when I want to. Also I *think* in AUTO mode you are lock out of exposure compensation settings and few other settings?

06-06-2014, 05:28 PM   #17
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,109
QuoteOriginally posted by ruggiex Quote
Also I *think* in AUTO mode you are lock out of exposure compensation settings and few other settings?
You are locked out of any real input and that is the primary difference between AUTO (green) mode and P mode.


Steve
06-06-2014, 05:41 PM   #18
Veteran Member
OregonJim's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posts: 1,329
QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
The time it is used is when you are attempting precise determination of exposure for particular parts of the scene.
I agree. "Thinking in EV" is a more precise mindset than the traditonal exposure triangle, and is most useful in scenes with high dynamic range.

Witness the zone system of Ansel Adams, which predates HDR by decades. You would take spot meter readings of areas of your scene to determine the maximum and minimum EV values, and adjust exposure, development, and printing to achieve the highest dynamic range.
06-06-2014, 06:17 PM   #19
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,109
QuoteOriginally posted by OregonJim Quote
Witness the zone system of Ansel Adams, which predates HDR by decades. You would take spot meter readings of areas of your scene to determine the maximum and minimum EV values, and adjust exposure, development, and printing to achieve the highest dynamic range.
Yep! That is what was going through my mind as well.


Steve

06-06-2014, 06:41 PM   #20
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Far North Qld
Posts: 3,283
QuoteOriginally posted by ruggiex Quote
Also I *think* in AUTO mode you are lock out of exposure compensation settings and few other settings?
Yes, but unlike the K-7, the K-50's AUTO mode can be set to save as RAW and I've found that I get pretty good results, especially with my Sigma 30mm F1.4 The K-7's green mode was pretty much useless, not so true with the K-50 (and that's a bit dangerous actually )
06-06-2014, 07:01 PM   #21
Pentaxian
normhead's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Near Algonquin Park
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 25,065
I'm going to leave all the fancy explanations to the experts, and just say, use the EV setting to centre your histogram in you back screen...to me it doesn't matter what it is. It matters what it does, and what it does is allows me to set the histogram the way I want it.
06-06-2014, 07:26 PM   #22
Veteran Member
OregonJim's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posts: 1,329
QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
use the EV setting to centre your histogram in you back screen...to me it doesn't matter what it is. It matters what it does, and what it does is allows me to set the histogram the way I want it.
Some people (many, I hope) have a desire to learn photography, and are not content with a 'push this, dial that' approach.

If you really try to 'center the histogram' with all your pictures, you may want to dig a little deeper into what histograms represent.
06-06-2014, 09:42 PM   #23
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: East Bay Area
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 784
QuoteOriginally posted by Steve.Ledger Quote
Yes, but unlike the K-7, the K-50's AUTO mode can be set to save as RAW and I've found that I get pretty good results, especially with my Sigma 30mm F1.4 The K-7's green mode was pretty much useless, not so true with the K-50 (and that's a bit dangerous actually )
Auto metering certainly is improving all the time. Personally I stay away from AUTO just because I can have some control when I need it without changing modes, so P is much superior. Not to mention, for Pentax, it's Hyper P, not just regular P!

06-06-2014, 09:51 PM   #24
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Nelson B.C.
Posts: 3,246
I shoot in tv mode most of the time, my long lens is sharp wide open. I set the shutter speed to 1/800 and point at the subject. The camera calculates the aperture and iso to expose properly.

Say I'm shooting a bird against a cloudy sky. The camera sees all this bright white and sets the exposure with the result that the subject is very dark. I adjust the exposure compensation in this instance to +2ev, or two stops. Each stop is double the light. So the body adjusts the iso up or the aperture number down (opens aperture) and I expose my subject properly. Against a blue sky, +1 ev works. If I use spot metering and the subject is large enough the body does it for me.

As you process your images, you may find that you are always adjusting the exposure up or down consistently, or a lens may underexpose all the time, or a specific location always results in over exposure. You can set your exposure compensation to fit the circumstances.
06-07-2014, 05:36 AM   #25
Pentaxian
normhead's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Near Algonquin Park
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 25,065
QuoteOriginally posted by OregonJim Quote
Some people (many, I hope) have a desire to learn photography, and are not content with a 'push this, dial that' approach.

If you really try to 'center the histogram' with all your pictures, you may want to dig a little deeper into what histograms represent.
Or on the other hand I may not... I'm quite capable of using the histogram as a tool to understand what my exposure is in various situations like how I want my histogram to look for a sunset etc. Or, I might even already know what a histogram is, maybe even more than you. Regardless of what you "know", if you don't know how to apply your knowledge of what a histogram is in the field, using dials and buttons, you don't know anything useful.
06-07-2014, 06:41 PM   #26
mee
Site Supporter




Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 5,762
One thing I don't think has been mentioned here about the EV value and exposure compensation is that the camera, while metering, attempts to calculate exposure down to middle grey (aka middle tone).

Think of a gradient from
Pure Black ------------------------------------> to Pure White

Well when you take a photograph, the camera calculates what comes out in the middle.. which is grey.. middle grey 'exactly' between Black and White (trying to get the widest range of tones well exposed)

Pure Black ------------------|------------------> to Pure White

Right about where that line is in shades of grey.

This is useful for many shots where the scene is fairly evenly lit. However, this, in effect, will make bright snow appear dingy grey using auto settings as example. The trick is to override the camera's thinking and 'under' or 'over' expose the photo by going up or down EV steps. So, for that snow scene, you will likely have to go a couple clicks up in EV steps to get a properly white snow. The camera will freak out and think you are blowing out the shot. However, after you get the hang of your particular camera, you can think far more accurately than it can in achieving proper exposure.

At least this is how I've understood it. hehe
06-08-2014, 05:21 AM   #27
Pentaxian
normhead's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Near Algonquin Park
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 25,065
QuoteOriginally posted by mee Quote
One thing I don't think has been mentioned here about the EV value and exposure compensation is that the camera, while metering, attempts to calculate exposure down to middle grey (aka middle tone).

Think of a gradient from
Pure Black ------------------------------------> to Pure White

Well when you take a photograph, the camera calculates what comes out in the middle.. which is grey.. middle grey 'exactly' between Black and White (trying to get the widest range of tones well exposed)

Pure Black ------------------|------------------> to Pure White

Right about where that line is in shades of grey.

This is useful for many shots where the scene is fairly evenly lit. However, this, in effect, will make bright snow appear dingy grey using auto settings as example. The trick is to override the camera's thinking and 'under' or 'over' expose the photo by going up or down EV steps. So, for that snow scene, you will likely have to go a couple clicks up in EV steps to get a properly white snow. The camera will freak out and think you are blowing out the shot. However, after you get the hang of your particular camera, you can think far more accurately than it can in achieving proper exposure.

At least this is how I've understood it. hehe
Another example of why you need EV, the camera doesn't expect the brightest thing in your image to be the subject... the following subject, white subject in front of a dark background is shot at -1.3 EV to keep from blowing out the highlights.



This one taken at -1 for the same reason, even though the subject isn't all white, you still have to go -1 to protect the whites in the subject.


On the other side, an almost neutral grey subject against a white background needs +2 to properly expose the subject...


Last edited by normhead; 06-08-2014 at 05:30 AM.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
aperature, camera, dslr, ev, ev value, photography, shutter, value
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Value of a Pentax ME SE SLR? Prosty Pentax Film SLR Discussion 2 10-11-2012 11:07 PM
Good value used prime alternative to SMC-A f/1.4? gti5notrkt Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 18 11-16-2009 03:53 PM
Trying to find a value for my SLR and Acc. JoChan23 Photographic Technique 13 07-30-2009 08:22 PM
New to Pentax and find lens choices confusing seacapt Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 22 11-30-2008 09:22 AM
Pentax ME Super + Lenses: Street Value? drewdlephone Pentax Film SLR Discussion 6 11-12-2008 03:50 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:07 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top