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08-09-2014, 04:50 PM   #16
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Oops, sorry, I shouldn't have included that link. The pages linked to were judged large enough to read, the other link was judged too small. All the pages are there at the image shack links.

08-12-2014, 03:09 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by MadMathMind Quote
The issue I encounter most is that as a normal tourist or average Joe, your shooting conditions are often far from optimal.

Example: Pentaxians love their prime lenses over zoom lenses. They're great, no doubt. But the issue that plagues them is that they only work when you can move around freely to get the shot you want. If the lens is too short, then you can crop in post, but there is no such fix for too long. You either need to get lucky with the focal length or be able to back up a lot. The latter is sometimes not feasible. Try taking a few steps back in a crowded place: if you take 3 steps back, 3 people will jam into that space, so you can't take the shot. (This was exactly my experience in China. Was very thankful for the new Sigma 18-35.)

That's an example of where gear isn't technically necessary but practically speaking, it is. If you had a press pass and had the place to yourself, then no problem.

Same thing goes for fast lenses and high ISO. If you can use a tripod, then there's no worries. But very rarely can you, either due to the "people crowd" issue or venue rules. End result: an average Joe cares a lot about high ISO noise because the option to shoot at low ISO with a tripod is just not there most of the time.

Then, of course, for most of us, we have to take the pictures when we visit, even if the light is poor or suboptimal. Some can be fixed in post but it's not always fun to spend hours and hours editing photos. If gear can fix some of the problems beforehand, then it's worth it. Were we pros who visit a site for 3 days and take pictures at all hours of the day just so the light is right, then so much stuff wouldn't be necessary.
There is not only skill difference between a pro and an amateur. There also the time dedicated to it and the preparation. As you explained you might get far better results just by waiting for the ideal light, by being authorized to be in the best place to take the shoots, by arriving early and setting up your tripod and so on.

This is not even creativity or skill, this is no more than being organized and taking the time.

Still it might give you more than the best high iso body, fastest lens available and so on.

But it is only when you get all things rights (good organisation, enough time, creativity, skill, good gear) that you'll get the best results.
08-12-2014, 01:56 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nicolas06 Quote
This is not even creativity or skill, this is no more than being organized and taking the time.
There is a whole approach to photography based on formula. With average skills, appropriate planning and a "can't go wrong" location, you can get predictably incredible landscape photos. That is the basis for your typical destination photo workshop tour. The organizer puts you in the right place at the right time for you to push the button.

The same is true for portrait workshops, macro workshops, and just about any kind of workshop you can think of.


Steve
08-12-2014, 02:17 PM   #19
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Creativity and skill means nothing without organisation and taking the time.


Dang I forgot me camera again

08-12-2014, 04:16 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
There is a whole approach to photography based on formula. With average skills, appropriate planning and a "can't go wrong" location, you can get predictably incredible landscape photos. That is the basis for your typical destination photo workshop tour. The organizer puts you in the right place at the right time for you to push the button.

The same is true for portrait workshops, macro workshops, and just about any kind of workshop you can think of.


Steve
Of course but like many thing you need maybe 10% creativity, 90% work.
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