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09-05-2014, 04:35 AM   #1
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Gyroscopes In Cameras

A good article. With Pentax's in-body stabilization, they essentially already have gyros in the body to sense and measure the movement. There are additional uses that these can be applied to, such as...
  • Hyperlapses / Video Stabilization
  • Blur Reduction
  • Panoramas



09-05-2014, 05:38 AM   #2
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I laughed a little when I read about the hyperlapse video. There are so many complaints about the similar feature on the K-3.


Steve
09-05-2014, 08:57 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by interested_observer Quote
With Pentax's in-body stabilization, they essentially already have gyros in the body . . .
I don't believe you can call Pentax's SR a gyroscope-driven system. There are limitations as what could be accomplished with SR compared to actual gyros.
09-05-2014, 07:39 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I laughed a little when I read about the hyperlapse video. There are so many complaints about the similar feature on the K-3.

Steve
QuoteOriginally posted by pacerr Quote
I don't believe you can call Pentax's SR a gyroscope-driven system. There are limitations as what could be accomplished with SR compared to actual gyros.
The reason why I even made the post is that, with in-body stabilization (SR), Pentax already has 2D (X and Y axis) sense and measurement capabilities. There are additional functionalities that could provide differentiation. Pentax has stated several time that they are looking to differentiate their products from the rest of the market. Actual implementation is dependent upon the end result that they would want to achieve and the architecture / design employed. I haven't used a K3, so I can't comment on the hyperlapse video.

If you are going to go the trouble of implementing some new capability, you need to at least make it very useable and bullet proof.



09-06-2014, 05:45 AM   #5
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Gyroscopes are not used in the camera. My guess is that hake reduction is accomplished using tiny hall effect sensors. The same type of sensor used in seismometers. If you put a gyroscope in the camera it would resist movement in any direction away from the plane of rotation of the spinning gyroscope. I would also eat up battery life as it would always have to be spinning. The hall effect sensor and the gyroscope operate under two different principles. One is resistance to motion and the other senses changes to a magnetic field.

Whatever is used, it works great. At a recent visit to the North Dakota Heritage Center in Bismarck, ND I was able to get good shots using available light with shutter speeds of up to.4 seconds. All my shots at .3 seconds and faster were keepers from a sharpness point of view. That was using the Sigma 17 -70 mm lens.
09-10-2014, 05:03 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
Gyroscopes are not used in the camera.
Actually, they are. Pentax uses InvenSense solid state Coriolis effect gyros.
09-10-2014, 09:22 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by kh1234567890 Quote
Pentax uses InvenSense solid state Coriolis effect gyros.
Unfortunately, those 'Coriolis' effect gyros tumble and re-align upside down and then 'spin' in reverse when crossing the equator into the southern hemisphere. Doubles the effect when the camera is held in the left hand. Converts RAW files into negative images during the process too.

09-10-2014, 06:23 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by pacerr Quote
Unfortunately, those 'Coriolis' effect gyros tumble and re-align upside down and then 'spin' in reverse when crossing the equator into the southern hemisphere. Doubles the effect when the camera is held in the left hand. Converts RAW files into negative images during the process too.

Accelerates global warming and loosens dental fillings too.


Steve

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