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07-27-2015, 07:38 AM   #61
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Consider this shot of mine taken back in 2008 with my first digital was a lot better as far as sharpness is concerned and it was taken at dawn. Low light with a k10 and kit lens. To my eye it is a lot more sharper than shots I am taking today with a k5 and a €1000 16-50 sdm.

http://500px.com/photo/116278125

07-27-2015, 09:08 AM   #62
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mattox Quote
Consider this shot of mine taken back in 2008 with my first digital was a lot better as far as sharpness is concerned and it was taken at dawn. Low light with a k10 and kit lens. To my eye it is a lot more sharper than shots I am taking today with a k5 and a €1000 16-50 sdm.

http://500px.com/photo/116278125
TBH, it doesn't look especially sharp and detail is slightly lacking (jpeg softening?)

What kind of sharpening are you applying during your processing? Your K-5 is going to capture significantly more image information than the K10D, so the detail is there but it's up to you to bring it out.
07-27-2015, 09:38 AM - 1 Like   #63
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mattox Quote
As pointed out when using manual focus in landscape your can acquire better retults but I find that on the APSC system with such a small viewfinder and LCD it is so hard to get so accurate. The naked eye can't really fine tune that well within small detail. For me at the moment I rely on selecting my AF subject in liveview and shoot. I cannot see a better way to get better results at this stage.
If you are using AF for landscape photography because the optical viewfinder is too small and rear LCD lacks detail, I suggest something like this might serve you well...


Chamonix 045N-2, from my personal collection

The 4"x5" ground glass should be spacious enough and with the generous movements and the aid of a focus loupe, you should have little trouble with fine focus control. It is slow, but worth the effort. Bulk and weight of kit is comparable to a FF dSLR. The only big negative is that the total cost of kit is more than many FF digital SLRs. Oh...focus in low light is still a little iffy, the solution is an assistant with a small flashlight (torch).

Just a small joke

Back to the serious side of things, CDAF in live view should serve you well, as should magnified manual focus in live view. Live view magnification is the functional equivalent of using a loupe on the view camera's ground glass. The solution of using an assistant to determine focus point in dim light is also fully serious. To continue with the view camera parallel, it is easier to get adequate DOF for near/far focus on APS-C than with 4x5 format. That being said, the point should be taken that true sharpness across the frame for near/far usually requires manipulation of the focus plane relative to the lens. DOF, by itself, is usually not enough for large prints where both foreground and distant mountains must be sharp.


Steve

Last edited by stevebrot; 07-27-2015 at 09:58 AM.
07-27-2015, 10:11 AM   #64
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vihmameister Quote
How big is this - aftermarket screen?
It fits inside the camera in place of the stock focus screen and provides a viewfinder image similar to the best manual focus cameras of the 1980s. Mine was made by Katz Eye Optics and I would not do manual focus without it. Sadly they are no longer in business. A similar product with both split-image and microprism focus aides is available from focusingscreen.com:

Focusing Screen

I understand that you had better luck with your other cameras and suspect the difference is due to the K-3's higher resolution. What you see at full resolution on the K-3 has significantly more detail than the K-50 or K-5. That is good if focus is accurate and there is no camera motion. When there is missed focus or camera motion, it is much more obvious on the K-3 than with your previous cameras. To test, you can down-sample your K-3 image to the same resolution as the K-5/K-50.


Steve

07-27-2015, 10:33 AM   #65
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vihmameister Quote
So i use Normal or Macro regimes only
There is no macro program line. We may have a small problem in language translation here. The options according to the English version of the user manual are (in order, top-to-bottom as presented on the camera menu):
  • Auto (camera chooses program line)
  • Normal (default, works for general shooting)
  • Hi-speed priority (used if you want to freeze motion and don't mind if the aperture is wide)
  • DOF priority, deep (used if you want narrow apertures and don't mind a slow shutter speed)
  • DOF priority, shallow (used if you want wide apertures)
  • MTF priority (tries to use the apertures where the lens has the highest optical resolution (MTF). This only works with Pentax-brand FA, FA-J, DA, and D FA series lenses.)
Again, the program line choice does not change focus accuracy or precision, though it may make missed focus more obvious if DOF is inadequate.


Steve
07-27-2015, 11:03 AM   #66
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vihmameister Quote
This one really confuses me.
Sorry, I made an error. In manual focus, the available focus points depends on the lens type.
  • Non-AF lenses are limited to center point for manual focus confirm and catch-in-focus. This is the case regardless of what settings you might use for AF lenses.
  • FA, DA, and D FA series allow all focus point options for both AF and manual focus confirm. (I don't know about F and FA-J series.)
In use, both these bullet points are obvious. What I would suggest is simply sitting down and playing with the camera using the modes you think would be useful and seeing if they work in the manner you expect. For example, catch-in-focus will only work if the AF/MF switch on the body is in the AF position and the mode is AF-S.* As a result, some lenses (e.g. All FA-series) cannot be used for catch-in-focus.


Steve

* There are other fine points regarding CIF depending on camera configuration.
07-27-2015, 11:11 AM   #67
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vihmameister Quote
But i still refuse only central point usage, otherwise all this AF system is just plain junk.
Use the focus point(s) that suit you best, but be aware of their limitations. BTW, those limitations are not just Pentax. CDAF in live view might be your better option if you need a free choice of AF points and high accuracy. The process is slower, but that is the trade-off.


Steve
07-27-2015, 11:27 AM   #68
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vihmameister Quote
What some call pixel peeping, i call hi-quality printout ability.
Then you must adjust your technique to match the high-quality print capabilities of your camera. The bar is set significantly higher with your K-3 than your previous cameras. If the full-resolution image is softer than you expect, it means one or more of the below:
  • The intended portion of the frame is out of focus
  • The subject moved during the exposure
  • The camera moved during the exposure
  • The optical quality of your lens in inadequate
In regards to the first bullet, there are limitations to both the PDAF (viewfinder) system and manual focus using the optical viewfinder (discussed in detail in comments above). In addition, the accuracy of both is subject to proper calibration. If you have persistent problems with either, camera service may be an option. Before shipping the camera off a check against manual focus using magnified live view (actual image at the focal plane) may be helpful. Focus using the viewfinder first and switch to live view without touching the lens. Do this several times for the same subject and distance. Consistent front/back focus indicates a need for AF fine adjust or (for the optical system) re-shimming the focus screen.


Steve

07-27-2015, 11:39 AM   #69
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QuoteOriginally posted by bm75 Quote
2- the optical viewfinder always suffers from a certain degree of front/backfocus. Only liveview offers you real sensor image . No way it could be otherwise with OVF.
This is certainly true, though the face of a properly calibrated focus screen in a well-made camera should be sufficiently close to the actual focal plane distance for photographic purposes. When a user is having focus issues, I heartily endorse doing troubleshooting on tripod using magnified live view with a stationary subject. Doing so will rule out camera and subject motion as well as missed focus. The only thing left is poor quality optics.


Steve
07-27-2015, 11:46 AM   #70
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QuoteOriginally posted by aleonx3 Quote
I don't want to join into arguments about inadequate AF in different Pentax models...but IMHO those points are tie to user errors more than anything else.
Historically, that looks to be the case on this site, that and user expectations. I try to not point the user error "finger" too strongly, though. Sometimes the camera is not functioning properly or there has been an inadvertent change in settings. There is also a confusion factor that can afflict even highly experienced photographers with decades of experience. These cameras are complex


Steve
07-27-2015, 12:06 PM   #71
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mattox Quote
Consider this shot of mine taken back in 2008 with my first digital was a lot better as far as sharpness is concerned and it was taken at dawn. Low light with a k10 and kit lens. To my eye it is a lot more sharper than shots I am taking today with a k5 and a €1000 16-50 sdm.

http://500px.com/photo/116278125
I took a short tour of your postings at 500px and there are some impressive images taken with your K10D and K-5. This one in particular (taken with FA 35/2...a favorite of mine), I found striking...

https://500px.com/photo/116079645

I also did a lot of very credible work with my K10D and DA 18-55/3.5-5.6 (v1), but the same lens on my K-3 is simply not up to the challenge. That being said, if I down-sample the K-3 images taken with the kit lens to 10 Mpixels, they look every bit as good as the K10D shots. As noted in a previous post Nikon D800/D810 users got a wake up call in terms of technique courtesy of their high definition sensor. The K-3's sensor definition (if not the pixel count) is the same and provides similar challenge.

I only have a tiny bit of experience with the K-5 16 Mpixel sensor, but would expect that there may be a similar phenomenon.


Steve
07-28-2015, 03:44 AM   #72
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I took a short tour of your postings at 500px and there are some impressive images taken with your K10D and K-5. This one in particular (taken with FA 35/2...a favorite of mine), I found striking...

https://500px.com/photo/116079645

I also did a lot of very credible work with my K10D and DA 18-55/3.5-5.6 (v1), but the same lens on my K-3 is simply not up to the challenge. That being said, if I down-sample the K-3 images taken with the kit lens to 10 Mpixels, they look every bit as good as the K10D shots. As noted in a previous post Nikon D800/D810 users got a wake up call in terms of technique courtesy of their high definition sensor. The K-3's sensor definition (if not the pixel count) is the same and provides similar challenge.

I only have a tiny bit of experience with the K-5 16 Mpixel sensor, but would expect that there may be a similar phenomenon.


Steve
Thanks for the kind comments Steve. The image that you saw taken with the 35/2 was taken 2 weeks ago and due to current issue I am having I decided to take adequate attention to the AF side of the shot, ie live view, tripod, aperture not exceeding f11 and was quite happy with the results really
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