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06-19-2008, 10:26 AM   #1
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Page 128 of k10d manual, help needed.

The light temperature scale on p128 shows Daylight at around 5200k and Clear sky at 10000k.

Maybe im stupid which is a distinct possability, but arent these two the same thing? If so, why have they been assigned differing values and under what circumstances would they be used.

Sorry for being so dumb


Peter

06-19-2008, 10:35 AM   #2
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"Daylight" corresponds very closely to the temperature of the sun, which is 5500K. Open sky, because of the scattering of blue light is said to be at a much higher temperature because blue photons have more energy. It all has to do with Planck Black Body radiation and the relationship between temperature and color.

If you want to wade through some physics you can look here: Black body - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
06-19-2008, 10:43 AM   #3
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Daylight can vary greatly from dawn to dusk, shade to full sun etc. So the temperature will change. Flashes on the other hand are calibrated to a cetain temperature to all look roughly the same.

It's long winded but will give you a good understanding of the situation:
Color temperature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
06-19-2008, 10:59 AM   #4
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Thank you both!!

However, im looking for a more practical approach. I am leaving for the island of Samos in Greece on Sunday where I plan to undertake a three week project based on the theme of disapearing world. This will be my first attempt at trying to capture images of a high standard. I have spent years capturing without a particualr goal in mind, for my own viewing pleasure if you kike.

The days are usually clear skys, full on sun. Excluding sunrise, sunset what will be the optimum temperature for that particuar set of circumstances?


Regards
Peter

06-19-2008, 11:16 AM   #5
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OK well it is important to understand the above info. The most important is getting the correct exposure. You can fill your mind up with physics or keep it simple. Go to your local camera store and get a gray card. You can lock the exposure settings in any light circumstance with that and get the shots you want. Make sure you have CPL's for any lenses you are taking as well. I've been there myself and daytime shooting at this time of year can be a challenge. Many of the older buildings are white or white washed and the skys are bright. The towns are mostly around the coast and you'll face challenges with water reflections as well.

A CPL is a must have item. I would suggest a ND graduated filter as well. The Cokin P system will help greatly here because you only need one of each filter and adapters for each lens. Or you can also use step up/down rings to reduce costs on filters if a lot of lenses are required.

If you are not comfortable or don't have the time to use a gray card. Remember one thing. Expose for the bright. So if you are shooting a temple that is white marble at 2 PM and in bright sun. put the CPL on the lens, adjust it for a nice blue sky and point the (spot meter setting) camera at the brightest part of the temple. Use the AE-L button to lock that exposure setting and then focus compose the shot as you want. Hyper Program or manual is great for this. The settings are locked to a given value and you can then adjust for DOF with aperature or faster stop action with the shutter. Remember that a blown out section of a shot is not recoverable (all detail is gone) but you can get 2-4 stops out of darker areas if you shoot in RAW and use low ISO`s

A good flash would be a big asset. If you were in a narrow street with a bright sky. You would lock the settings for the sky or another bright part of the scene. Then use the flash to brighten the nearby darker parts of the composition.

Bracket Bracket Bracket!!! Take a portable HD and take way more shots than you anticipate. Nat Geo photogs shoot 20,000 images for one assignment to have 40 keepers in the magazine.

Edit. Take a decent tripod. Use it. SR is great but there (IMO) will never be a good subsitute for a solid tripod to get the best images. It's pain to carry around but you will not regret the imporvment in quality. I'll suggest one big reason. We see all these threads on BF/FF lens issues. I'm firmly convinced that the problem is more about our bodies moving front to back after focus lock is made. So you lock the focus, you try hard to stand still but your body sways forward 3 inches before you hit the shutter. The focus point moves with your body and the image is slightly soft. Using a tripod eliminates that possiblity. Your camera can't move and once the focus point is locked, it stays there. Your shots will be better every time.

Last edited by Peter Zack; 06-19-2008 at 11:28 AM.
06-19-2008, 04:28 PM   #6
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As added insurance shoot in RAW. You can then adjust exposure and white balance after the fact.
07-08-2008, 04:31 AM   #7
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Peter, Mark, Workingdog. Thamks so much for

your advice and suggestions. Sorry this reply is so late, preparation for the trip and the lack of net access has slowed me down a bit. Which isnt such a bad thing in this hectic world.

I picked up a CP yesterday from a dealer in Samos and i have to say WOW Peter, thanks for the pointer. Im shooting RAW exclusivly and tripod every image. I had some very interesting results using the little mentioned multiexposure feature on the K10. There is a windfarm high on a mountain and the feature captures the motion in the blades very effectivly. Its also very useful for moving water in daylight.


Well ill post a few results on my return next week


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07-08-2008, 05:46 AM   #8
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I tend to disagree with Peter on one point. Using spot meter on a white subject will render it "neutral" gray. I would use spot, then expose 1 to 1 1/2 EV above the suggested exposure, so the white stays white and you still get details in the dark area. To make sure I get everything, I'd give strong considerations to bracketting. But the best way would still be reading the exposure off a gray card.

07-08-2008, 06:34 AM   #9
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I would also be careful using a polarizing filter because it can nead to artificial looking blue skies. I do enjoy my polarizer but if I use it at high noon or at high elevations it can turn skies almost black.
07-08-2008, 07:18 AM   #10
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My advice:

1, Shoot raw. I see workingdog has already suggested this but he offered it as "additional insurance." I want to suggest this is the FIRST thing you should do.

2, Set white balance in the K10D on "auto" and forget about it. The K10D does a terrific job with white balance - not perfect, especially when light sources are mixed, but really remarkably good. I find that I have to correct white balance in a small fraction of photos. And when I do, the fact that I've shot raw makes it easy.

A gray card is a useful thing to have. But not necessary. Even if you didn't shoot a gray card, you should be able to adjust white balance in post-processing fairly easily.

Will
07-08-2008, 07:30 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote

A gray card is a useful thing to have. But not necessary. Even if you didn't shoot a gray card, you should be able to adjust white balance in post-processing fairly easily.

Will
I hardly ever use the gray card for white balance. I think it is a lot more useful to meter exposure to avoid blown highlights (Pentax cameras are already pretty good in that area) in high contrast exposure situations.
07-08-2008, 09:16 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by flyer Quote
I tend to disagree with Peter on one point. Using spot meter on a white subject will render it "neutral" gray. I would use spot, then expose 1 to 1 1/2 EV above the suggested exposure, so the white stays white and you still get details in the dark area. To make sure I get everything, I'd give strong considerations to bracketting. But the best way would still be reading the exposure off a gray card.
I agree but maybe should have explained further. If the shots are in RAW then adjusting for correct WB is relatively easy. With this trip and the intense daytime sun he'll experience, IMO it's better to get the details in the whites and correct WB later than loose contrast and detail in a white-washed building or marble temple. Maybe it's not the 'right-way' to do it, but it's worked for me.


As we both said a Gray card is best if that's possible.
07-08-2008, 11:04 PM   #13
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exposure

maybe not the time to learn a new technique before your big trip, but for high-contrast lighting like you may have, i think the method described here works really nicely. its mainly a restating of some of what others have said in this thread already, but condensed, and step by step.

have fun on the trip! i'm jealous
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