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11-25-2015, 06:35 PM   #16
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Currently only $45 at Adorama: Pentax O-ICK1 Image Sensor Cleaning Kit 39357

---------- Post added 11-25-15 at 08:46 PM ----------

It takes a licking and keeps on clicking. (Maybe only us old folks will get the word play on the Timex slogan.) :-)

I had a devil of a time last week using the Eclipse pre-moistened swab sticks in sealed packets. I bought a package a year or so ago; some swab sticks had dried out and other left a residue after evaporation. So I bought a new bottle of solution and a new package swab sticks. The new solution cleaned better but it took a few goes at it. Makes me wander if the pre-moistened swabs have an expiration date?

11-25-2015, 08:15 PM   #17
Des
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I have been shooting Pentax dSLR since 2007, change my lenses a lot, and have never needed anything more that a rocket blower to remove common dust. If you sneeze into the body (it happens) or take on salt spray with the lens off, that will required something more than a puff of air.
Half your luck Steve. I try to be careful but have had to clean the sensor a number of times.

I would underline Steve's advice to use a blower before attempting anything that involves touching the sensor.

When that doesn't work (in a damp climate stuff tends to stick to the sensor) I use Dust-Aid Platinum kit: DSLR Camera Sensor Cleaning | Dust-Aid. Similar principle to the Pentax kit (silicon pad to pick up the dust). Generally works well.

Wet cleaning is a last resort.

I got some CleanSkies acrylic brushes on the recommendation of a member here. They are high-quality paintbrushes. You "charge" the brush with compressed air before use. They are good for removing sticky stuff like pollen, and less hazardous than wet cleaning. However @Digitalis pointed out that acrylic brushes often have tiny barbs on the end of the bristles that could damage a sensor over time.

QuoteOriginally posted by RHN12 Quote
It cost me AUD70.00 and took them about an hour and a half to remove "... surface dust from the mirror box area ... wet swabbed the filter surface. Basic external clean & test of the camera ... tested the filter clean by taking several test images ... externally cleaned the lens and elements ... standard focal testing."
That's a bargain. C R Kennedy charges $88. Where did you take it? (Somewhere local would be handy to know about. Greetings from Foster, @RHN12.)

Last edited by Des; 11-29-2015 at 03:37 PM.
11-25-2015, 08:55 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by EssJayEff Quote
Currently only $45 at Adorama
That's $60 CAD plu shipping... not any cheaper.
11-25-2015, 09:40 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
After trying different methods including blowers, dry and wet wiping kits and (some time ago) an expensive and (in hindsight) rather poor Arctic Butterfly
I still use my Arctic butterfly and sensor brushes, combined with the wet cleaning products for visible dust. Yes they are expensive, but they work consistently. The arctic butterflies are best suited for in field cleaning - not as a complete cleaning solution in itself.

11-26-2015, 01:28 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by bertwert Quote
That's $60 CAD plu shipping... not any cheaper.
I got mine from Bristol Cameras here in the UK. 25 + shipping.
11-26-2015, 03:39 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Whoa! Before you go out and buy cleaning kits, consider the fact that many users on this site have NEVER used a sensor cleaner (wet type or dry) despite many years shooting with Pentax dSLRs.

If you find dust on your sensor and it is bad enough to not deal with in post-processing, here is the time-honored flow:
  • Attempt the in-camera dust removal feature. Give it 3 or 4 tries. Sometimes it works.
  • Use the mirror-up cleaning feature (set-up menu 4) to expose the sensor and attempt removal using a "rocket"-type blower (Giottos or equivalent) to puff a stream of air at the sensor. This is described in your user manual. Do not use a blower with attached brush. Do not touch the blower tip to the sensor. Do not use "canned" air or other pressurized air source.
  • If the blower fails to clear the screen, give one of the commercially available wet or dry kits
I have been shooting Pentax dSLR since 2007, change my lenses a lot, and have never needed anything more that a rocket blower to remove common dust. If you sneeze into the body (it happens) or take on salt spray with the lens off, that will required something more than a puff of air.


Steve
+1 I agree - blower has worked every time - so far.
11-26-2015, 06:14 AM   #22
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I leave that to pros at Vistek local store if blower does not help. I have Giotto blower which is very good and at Vistek for wet cleaning they charge 40CAD + tax with turnaround time of 15-30 minutes. For me it is the best solution while once in few years I can afford this and no headache about what to buy or not to buy...

You may try luck at your local "pro" store... Unfortunately Vistek has stores only in Toronto, Mississauga, Ottawa, Calgary and Edmonton, nothing in BC.
11-26-2015, 06:27 AM   #23
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My favorite method is the static brush thing - you blow air on the sensor brush, it becomes static, and picks up the dust really easily. All clean in two or three swipes. The blower hardly ever works for me, i've got a Giotto large. It gets about 1/3 of the junk off, maybe.

Bertwert, make sure you're changing lenses with the camera pointed down, so dust won't enter! If you aren't doing that already.

11-26-2015, 06:59 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Whoa! Before you go out and buy cleaning kits, consider the fact that many users on this site have NEVER used a sensor cleaner (wet type or dry) despite many years shooting with Pentax dSLRs.

If you find dust on your sensor and it is bad enough to not deal with in post-processing, here is the time-honored flow:
  • Attempt the in-camera dust removal feature. Give it 3 or 4 tries. Sometimes it works.
  • Use the mirror-up cleaning feature (set-up menu 4) to expose the sensor and attempt removal using a "rocket"-type blower (Giottos or equivalent) to puff a stream of air at the sensor. This is described in your user manual. Do not use a blower with attached brush. Do not touch the blower tip to the sensor. Do not use "canned" air or other pressurized air source.
  • If the blower fails to clear the screen, give one of the commercially available wet or dry kits
I have been shooting Pentax dSLR since 2007, change my lenses a lot, and have never needed anything more that a rocket blower to remove common dust. If you sneeze into the body (it happens) or take on salt spray with the lens off, that will required something more than a puff of air.


Steve
Totally agree with the advice here. Take things one step at a time, rather than going for the full cleaning kit first. Remember, the longer the sensor is exposed to the air unprotected, the more dust can get in.

I have a K-S2 which picked up a couple of dust specs, and none of the in camera tools would shift it. I picked up a simple "rocket" blower for 1.49 from ebay (the same as to ones supplied by camera shops for 15) and carefully directed a couple of blasts of air towards the exposed sensor. Problem solved.
11-26-2015, 07:15 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by bertwert Quote
That's $60 CAD plu shipping... not any cheaper.
Back in June I bought one for $29.98 CAD plus $16.98 CAD shipping (total $46.96) from ebay seller "buyfromjapan".

Last edited by pete-tarmigan; 11-26-2015 at 07:21 AM.
11-26-2015, 07:59 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by RAART Quote
You may try luck at your local "pro" store
Local store I would probably consider Calgary
QuoteOriginally posted by Imp Quote
Bertwert, make sure you're changing lenses with the camera pointed down, so dust won't enter!
I need to work on that...
11-26-2015, 09:03 AM   #27
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Too funny ! Silly phone and led eyes.
11-26-2015, 09:04 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by condor27596 Quote
Too funny ! Silly phone and led eyes.
?

Are you in the right thread?
11-26-2015, 09:15 AM - 3 Likes   #29
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The problem with dust removal is that it always depends on what kind of "dust" is on the sensor.

First off, those who say they've never had problems with dust on their sensors are either the gadget guys who trade bodies too quickly to get them dusty, or they're the ones who do all their portrait shooting at f2.8 or wider (you know who you are) and never see instances where it shows up ... well, at least until they go on vacation and shoot some landscapes and blue skies at f16 and, horror of horrors, where did all that crap come from?

Yes, I'm one of those guys people turn to to get their sensor clean. I charge $60 CDN, incidentally, and I usually spend close to 2 hours cleaning the body, mirror box, and then the sensor. There's my time, and all those expensive swabs and cleaning solutions, but the repeat business I get suggests that my customers consider it money well spent. Then again, I do get those who expect me to just "blow it out" while they wait at the counter, and are shocked to find out it's not so easy. They've been watching too many on-line videos. For instance, I cleaned a full frame Canon sensor yesterday. It took me 27 passes, before I was satisfied all specks were gone.

Dust can be light fluffy particles that can sometimes be swept off by the cleaning mode, a puff of a blower, or plucked off by a sticky probe like the Pentax swab. But there's also stuff that would be fun to give to a forensic lab to find out what it is. Organic things like pollen particles are designed to stick to things, and often don't just blow away, and the sticky lifters sometimes just mash them down onto the glass surface (fortunately, newer sensors have non stick coatings on the filter glass that are more cooperative). That's when the wet cleaning comes in. Depending on the kind of "dust" involved (oily particles sprayed from the shutter unit, anyone?) I have to use a combination of methods to reach my goal. The sticky probes are often what I use to finish up the job when all the worst stuff is gone.

I think having a sticky probe like the Pentax one is perfect to take along on a trip, just in case something ugly shows up in your skies.

But keep in mind, it's not hard to make things worse, as many have pointed out above. I had a customer whose cameras kept getting dusty way more than you'd think they should. He assured me he did his best to keep his sensors clean, and had a blower to "blow it out" every now and again. His old rubber blower was pushing more dust in than he was ever getting out!
11-26-2015, 10:22 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ontarian50 Quote
The problem with dust removal is that it always depends on what kind of "dust" is on the sensor.

First off, those who say they've never had problems with dust on their sensors are either the gadget guys who trade bodies too quickly to get them dusty, or they're the ones who do all their portrait shooting at f2.8 or wider (you know who you are) and never see instances where it shows up ... well, at least until they go on vacation and shoot some landscapes and blue skies at f16 and, horror of horrors, where did all that crap come from?

Yes, I'm one of those guys people turn to to get their sensor clean. I charge $60 CDN, incidentally, and I usually spend close to 2 hours cleaning the body, mirror box, and then the sensor. There's my time, and all those expensive swabs and cleaning solutions, but the repeat business I get suggests that my customers consider it money well spent. Then again, I do get those who expect me to just "blow it out" while they wait at the counter, and are shocked to find out it's not so easy. They've been watching too many on-line videos. For instance, I cleaned a full frame Canon sensor yesterday. It took me 27 passes, before I was satisfied all specks were gone.

Dust can be light fluffy particles that can sometimes be swept off by the cleaning mode, a puff of a blower, or plucked off by a sticky probe like the Pentax swab. But there's also stuff that would be fun to give to a forensic lab to find out what it is. Organic things like pollen particles are designed to stick to things, and often don't just blow away, and the sticky lifters sometimes just mash them down onto the glass surface (fortunately, newer sensors have non stick coatings on the filter glass that are more cooperative). That's when the wet cleaning comes in. Depending on the kind of "dust" involved (oily particles sprayed from the shutter unit, anyone?) I have to use a combination of methods to reach my goal. The sticky probes are often what I use to finish up the job when all the worst stuff is gone.

I think having a sticky probe like the Pentax one is perfect to take along on a trip, just in case something ugly shows up in your skies.

But keep in mind, it's not hard to make things worse, as many have pointed out above. I had a customer whose cameras kept getting dusty way more than you'd think they should. He assured me he did his best to keep his sensors clean, and had a blower to "blow it out" every now and again. His old rubber blower was pushing more dust in than he was ever getting out!
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