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06-30-2016, 02:29 AM   #106
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sliver-Surfer Quote
Most people buy battery grips to look like they know what they are doing .
Are you serious or are you just trying to be inflammatory?

Most people don't buy battery grips at all. The people who do buy them do so to provide themselves more stability with large lenses, in particular in portrait shooting position. Additionally battery grips provide a second battery. I don't usually shoot with one on the camera, but when my wife shoots a wedding she always has one on the camera.

06-30-2016, 06:27 AM - 1 Like   #107
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nicolas06 Quote
Try a 600 f/4 with an A7 and try it with a D5 and then we will discuss again. In all case the diminutive size of an mirrorless body is no argument when you have huge lenses to put on it. There more benefit to have something bigger, with more direct commands (like more wheels on K1), that feel better even with only one hand (if the other one is holding a flash for example) etc...
Nobody uses a 600mm f4 handheld. The 4/600mm was designed for 35mm film cameras so it was used for over a decade on cameras the same size as an A7.

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 09:43 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
Are you serious or are you just trying to be inflammatory?

Most people don't buy battery grips at all. The people who do buy them do so to provide themselves more stability with large lenses, in particular in portrait shooting position. Additionally battery grips provide a second battery. I don't usually shoot with one on the camera, but when my wife shoots a wedding she always has one on the camera.
I said most people buy them to look like they know what they are doing. Your wife uses it for the right reason. It provides a portrait grip position.
Have you noticed that the portrait grip is about the same size as the grip on an A7ii

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 09:53 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Nicolas06 Quote
The story of big grips to store a small battery is non sense. Physically an A7 is big enough to hold a K3 batterie without interfering with the path of light with the sensor. The DSLR batteries have less capacity than a smart phone battery typically and theses one fit a smartphone, indeed. This doesn't explain why a D5 is big and why it is usually advertised with the grip on.
The reason why a Nikon d5 is usually advertised with a grip on it is because the portrait grip is built into it.

Last edited by Sliver-Surfer; 06-30-2016 at 06:44 AM.
06-30-2016, 06:54 AM   #108
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sliver-Surfer Quote
Most people buy battery grips to look like they know what they are doing .
You just insulted everyone who uses a battery grips. Many of whom are seriously more knowledgeable and better photographer than you. What's wrong with you? Are you that desperate?

I don't know how to say this nice, so here goes, if you can't own a particular type of camera without trashing every one else's choices, you should probably be banned from camera ownership.

If there was "camera brand intolerance" police, they'd be kicking on your door right now.

Your endless stream of "everyone who doesn't think like me is an idiot" posts won't win you any friends, here or anywhere else. You seriously need to understand that what's important to you may not be relevant to anyone else in the world. And that makes you different, not better, or qualified to judge other folks decisions.

Last edited by normhead; 06-30-2016 at 07:00 AM.
06-30-2016, 07:30 AM   #109
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The only reasons you need a battery grip is if you are a portrait/wedding photographer or a very long exposure or elapse time photographer. Most other people buy it just because they want to look pro.

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 10:34 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
If there was "camera brand intolerance" police, they'd be kicking on your door right now.
OK MR.Pot
I don't bash Brands. Im bashing Oversized DSLR/SLT grips. There are no other tools out there that have grips so huge. If a chainsaw can have a grip the same size or smaller than an A7 why do people bash the a7 for it's ergonomics.


Last edited by Sliver-Surfer; 06-30-2016 at 07:56 AM.
06-30-2016, 07:51 AM   #110
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IN the spirit of the original poster, if one is a dedicated wildlife shooter, enough to have a 600mm lens, chances are that one would not select a mirrorless as your main camera. Then again, when 'blad has just come out with a mirrorless Med format camera, perhaps its a sign that conventions are changing.

Mirrorless used to mean smallish m4/3, then aps sensored Nex and Fuji, now FF and Med Format. Whether a camera is mirrorless or not, has nothing intrinsic to do with the size of the camera and its capability to support large lenses.
06-30-2016, 08:20 AM   #111
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sliver-Surfer Quote
The only reasons you need a battery grip is if you are a portrait/wedding photographer or a very long exposure or elapse time photographer. Most other people buy it just because they want to look pro.

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 10:34 AM ----------


OK MR.Pot
I don't bash Brands. Im bashing Oversized DSLR/SLT grips. There are no other tools out there that have grips so huge. If a chainsaw can have a grip the same size or smaller than an A7 why do people bash the a7 for it's ergonomics.
Are you so full of yourself, you don't see you just bashed everyone who buys a battery grip?
DO you not see you have not one fact to back up your assertion that most people who by battery grips are wannabes.

I don't even own a battery grip, but I have no problem seeing how offensive your posts are. Why don't you?
06-30-2016, 08:20 AM   #112
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I will just state generally that cameras are tools and in the end most of the same results are possible with an A7r as with a K-1, assuming you have similar lenses. I am glad that there are multiple different sizes on the market and different options. Ergonomics are very personal in nature and it is silly to tell someone with huge hands that they should want to use a small camera or someone with tiny hands that they should want to use a D810.

For me, personally, something about K3 size feels very comfortable to use and that's about all I can say.
06-30-2016, 08:24 AM   #113
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
You just insulted everyone who uses a battery grips. Many of whom are seriously more knowledgeable and better photographer than you. What's wrong with you? Are you that desperate?
I didn't insult everyone...Those that use battery grips for the right reason... they wont be insulted.

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 11:33 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
I will just state generally that cameras are tools and in the end most of the same results are possible with an A7r as with a K-1, assuming you have similar lenses. I am glad that there are multiple different sizes on the market and different options. Ergonomics are very personal in nature and it is silly to tell someone with huge hands that they should want to use a small camera or someone with tiny hands that they should want to use a D810.

For me, personally, something about K3 size feels very comfortable to use and that's about all I can say.
I wasn't really trying to put down large grips but I am saying they aren't a natural evolution of camera grips. They were an accommodation brought about in the late 90s that people got used to. I have very Large hands myself and with proper camera technique it doesn't matter whether the camera grip is normal 35mm camera sized or DSLR sized.


Last edited by Sliver-Surfer; 06-30-2016 at 08:49 AM.
06-30-2016, 08:50 AM   #114
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sliver-Surfer Quote
Those that are better better at photography than me usually use battery grips for the right reason... they wont be insulted.

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 11:33 AM ----------


I wasn't really trying to put down large grips but I am saying they aren't a natural evolution of camera grips. They were an accommodation brought about in the late 90s that people got used to. I have very Large hands myself and with proper camera technique it doesn't matter whether the camera grip is normal 35mm camera sized or DSLR sized.
Well OK then, that sounds more reasonable, but, you do realize that the battery grip is a natural evolution of the automatic film advance from the 60's. Even back in the 60's some people bought the auto-film advance which also attached to the bottom of the camera, just because they liked the ergonomics of the camera better with it attached. This thing goes way back to the 60s, and has nothing to do with the 90s and the era you're talking about. Some people just find extending the camera feels better to them. And if you want to sell those people a camera, you better accommodate them. To me, it's crazy, but that doesn't mean I don't understand its a thing, and a thing with history that goes back beyond 50 years. That's a long time history for a thing you are pretty much trying establish only has fad or posturing status.
06-30-2016, 09:48 AM   #115
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
Well OK then, that sounds more reasonable, but, you do realize that the battery grip is a natural evolution of the automatic film advance from the 60's. Even back in the 60's some people bought the auto-film advance which also attached to the bottom of the camera, just because they liked the ergonomics of the camera better with it attached. This thing goes way back to the 60s, and has nothing to do with the 90s and the era you're talking about. Some people just find extending the camera feels better to them. And if you want to sell those people a camera, you better accommodate them. To me, it's crazy, but that doesn't mean I don't understand its a thing, and a thing with history that goes back beyond 50 years. That's a long time history for a thing you are pretty much trying establish only has fad or posturing status.
People bought those film advance grips almost solely for film advance. All major brands had passive wooden/plastic grips available back then.
06-30-2016, 09:50 AM   #116
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sliver-Surfer Quote
People bought those film advance grips almost solely for film advance. All major brands had passive wooden/plastic grips available back then.
Well then you know exactly what this is about.

And I would suggest, you don't know everybody, and you have no idea why everybody bought those grips. Having been in film school I can say, I never saw a wooden or any other kind of base attachment other than an auto-advance, no wooden dummies, didn't even know they existed, but knew several folks who bought the advance, decided they didn't really need it but then kept it because they liked the camera with the film advance on more than they liked it without. You really should stop trying to project everyone else's experience from your own.

You're one guy, I'm one guy. Both our experiences contribute to "the way it was" but neither of us has the right to generalize on "the way it was." That's much larger than both of us.

Last edited by normhead; 06-30-2016 at 10:10 AM.
06-30-2016, 10:04 AM   #117
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
Well then you know exactly what this is about.
Finally we agree

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 01:05 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
Well then you know exactly what this is about.

And I would suggest, you don't know everybody, and you have no idea why everybody bought those grips. Having been in film school I can say, I never saw a wooden or any other kind of base attachment decide an auto-advance, no wooden dummies, didn't even know they existed, but knew several folk who bought the advance, decided they didn't really need it but then kept it because they like the camera with the film advance on more than they liked it without. You really should stop trying to project everyone else's experience from your own.
You were in film school for less than one semester. I remember you said that in a previous post

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 01:16 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
knew several folks who bought the advance, decided they didn't really need it but then kept it because they like the camera with the film advance on more than they liked it without.
this says alot about my whole "people buy grips to look like pros" but they don't use them for the right reason arguement.
06-30-2016, 10:49 AM   #118
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sliver-Surfer Quote
Finally we agree

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 01:05 PM ----------



You were in film school for less than one semester. I remember you said that in a previous post

---------- Post added 06-30-16 at 01:16 PM ----------


this says alot about my whole "people buy grips to look like pros" but they don't use them for the right reason arguement.
Not, really, both these guys were pros. The bought them because they thought they'd be a lot more useful than they actually were. But they did use them, since they were on the camera anyway. They were just surprised at how often they were completely non-essential, except as a grip., which is what the valued them for. Personally I don't know anyone who bought a grip to look like a pro. Almost all of them, including Adam the site owner, if memory serves we well like them because they make the camera more comfortable in their hands. I don't know of anyone who bought them for the looks.

I've challenged people on this before, asking why they needed grip, because it takes like 30 seconds to change the battery. The answer is almost universal. They buy the grip to extend the camera body and make it more comfortable. The extra battery life is a bonus feature.
06-30-2016, 11:09 AM   #119
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
Not, really, both these guys were pros. The bought them because they thought they'd be a lot more useful than they actually were. But they did use them, since they were on the camera anyway.
I agree, if these guys were pro's then they would need it for shooting all day portrait. But nowadays people want the extra grip because they hold their cameras wrong and they don't really need it. In fact the battery grip can interfere with proper technique in landscape mode when certain lenses are attached.

I sometimes use a grip when Im shooting single and headshot portrait gigs. But not when I have to do group portraits or events.

Last edited by Sliver-Surfer; 06-30-2016 at 11:48 AM.
06-30-2016, 11:23 AM   #120
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sliver-Surfer Quote
I agree, if these guys were pro's then they would need it for shooting all day portrait. But nowadays people want the extra grip because they hold their cameras wrong and they don't really need it. In fact the battery grip can interferes with proper technique in landscape mode when certain lenses are attached.

I sometimes use a grip when Im shooting single and headshot portrait gigs. But not when I have to do group portraits or events.
As I guy who shoots wildlife and landscape, I can't say I've ever needed a grip. Definitely not enough to lay out $200 for one.
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