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07-21-2008, 10:20 AM   #31
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ckanthon: One of the main differences between the K100D and K200D is that the K200D is weather sealed. I wouldn't be surprised if the battery compartments were the same, the difference being the seals on the K200D. I'm sure that they make up the 2mm difference.

NaCl(like another poster said, with the response from rechargeables why bother?)H2O

07-31-2008, 05:30 AM   #32
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Having worked with rechargeable CR-V3 lithium batteries on my Ist DS, I can say that you seldom need to recharge them. I have shot weddings and promotions and used the flash a lot with that. Before I bought the CR-V3 I would use penlights. I would have ran out of 2 sets (8x AA!) before the wedding was over or the afterparty was over.

As for the size, I do agree that the CR-V3 rechargeables are a bit larger but never really had any problems with that on my Ist DS. After I bought a K200D I noticed that the CR-V3's would not fit due to the shape of the battery compartiment. I have been dissapointed about that. (I almost got tempted to do some DIY on the compartiment..) The rechargeable CR-V3s are pretty expensive and I had hoped to be using them a lot more.

Rechargeable penlights give me just enough for a large photoshoot. If I make sure not to use the flash (which I like as a fill-in flash)

regards,
Jan Rinze.
07-31-2008, 07:32 AM   #33
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Yes, I am much disappointed too. Lithium rechargables and NiMHs are just two too different things that could ever be matched. NiMHs are just too old and is not suitable for digital cameras or just for any high power requirement high current drain electronics devices actually.

Can anyone still or could ever see any Radio Controlled helicopters that use NiMH batteries?? (My E-Sky and Walkera are all having Li-ploymer rechargeables.. They are much lightweight and can deliver high power with large stored energy per charge afterall)


QuoteOriginally posted by jan rinze Quote
Having worked with rechargeable CR-V3 lithium batteries on my Ist DS, I can say that you seldom need to recharge them. I have shot weddings and promotions and used the flash a lot with that. Before I bought the CR-V3 I would use penlights. I would have ran out of 2 sets (8x AA!) before the wedding was over or the afterparty was over.

As for the size, I do agree that the CR-V3 rechargeables are a bit larger but never really had any problems with that on my Ist DS. After I bought a K200D I noticed that the CR-V3's would not fit due to the shape of the battery compartiment. I have been dissapointed about that. (I almost got tempted to do some DIY on the compartiment..) The rechargeable CR-V3s are pretty expensive and I had hoped to be using them a lot more.

Rechargeable penlights give me just enough for a large photoshoot. If I make sure not to use the flash (which I like as a fill-in flash)

regards,
Jan Rinze.
07-31-2008, 08:40 AM   #34
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I have no love for Li-ion batteries....... see the following "problems".
A unique drawback of the Li-ion battery is that its life span is dependent upon aging from time of manufacturing (shelf life) regardless of whether it was charged, and not just on the number of charge/discharge cycles. So an older battery will not last as long as a new battery due solely to its age, unlike other batteries. This drawback is not widely published.[17]

At a 100% charge level, a typical Li-ion laptop battery that is full most of the time at 25 degrees Celsius or 77 degrees Fahrenheit will irreversibly lose approximately 20% capacity per year. However, a battery stored inside a poorly ventilated laptop may be subject to a prolonged exposure to much higher temperatures than 25 C, which will significantly shorten its life. The capacity loss begins from the time the battery was manufactured, and occurs even when the battery is unused. Different storage temperatures produce different loss results: 6% loss at 0 C (32 F), 20% at 25 C (77 F), and 35% at 40 C (104 F). When stored at 40% - 60% charge level, these figures are reduced to 2%, 4%, 15% at 0, 25 and 40 degrees Celsius respectively.

Under certain temperature conditions, the batteries have a tendency to become damaged and can sometimes never fully recharge again. In certain situations where the temperature is too cold (below the recommended battery temperature) the battery will still hold its charge but cannot be recharged as a result of the cold temperature. This is most common in smaller batteries such as cellular phones and handheld devices.

As batteries age, their internal resistance rises. This causes the voltage at the terminals to drop under load, reducing the maximum current that can be drawn from them. Eventually they reach a point at which the battery can no longer operate the equipment it is installed in for an adequate period.

High drain applications such as powertools may require the battery to be able to supply a current of (15 h-1)C - 15/hour times "C" - the battery capacity in Ampere hours, whereas MP3 players may only require (0.1 h-1)C (discharging in 10 hours). With similar technology, the MP3 battery can tolerate a much higher internal resistance, so will have an effective life of many more cycles.[18]

Li-ion batteries can even go into a state that is known as deep discharge. At this point, the battery may take a very long time to recharge. For example, a laptop battery that normally charges fully in 3 hours may take up to 42 hours to recharge. Or the deep discharge state may be so severe that the battery will never come back to life. Deep discharging only takes place when products with rechargeable batteries are left unused for extended periods of time (often 2 or more years) or when they are fully discharged so often that they can no longer hold a charge. This makes Li-ion batteries unsuitable for back-up applications where they may become completely discharged.

A stand-alone Li-ion cell must never be discharged below a certain voltage to avoid irreversible damage. Therefore all Li-ion battery systems are equipped with a circuit that shuts down the system when the battery is discharged below the predefined threshold.[13] It should thus be impossible to "deep discharge" the battery in a properly designed system during normal use. This is also one of the reasons Li-ion cells are rarely sold as such to consumers, but only as finished batteries designed to fit a particular system.

When the voltage monitoring circuit is built inside the battery (a so-called "smart" battery) rather than the equipment, it continuously draws a small current from the battery even when the battery is not in use; furthermore, the battery must not be stored fully discharged for prolonged periods of time, to avoid damage due to deep discharge.

Li-ion batteries are not as durable as nickel metal hydride or nickel-cadmium designs and can be extremely dangerous if mistreated. They are usually more expensive.

Li-ion chemistry is not as safe as nickel metal hydride or nickel-cadmium, and a Li-ion cell requires several mandatory safety devices to be built in before it can be considered safe for use outside of a laboratory. These are: shut-down separator (for overtemperature), tear-away tab (for internal pressure), vent (pressure relief), and thermal interrupt (overcurrent/overcharging).[13] The devices take away useful space inside the cells, and add an additional layer of unreliability. Typically, their action is to permanently and irreversibly disable the cell.

Approximately 1% of Li-ion batteries are the subject of recalls.[19] .

The number of safety features can be compared with that of a nickel metal hydride cell, which only has a hydrogen/oxygen recombination device (preventing damage due to mild overcharging) and a back-up pressure valve.[citation needed]

Lithium-ion battery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
AND to add confusion , when is a CR-v3 not a cr-v3? When one is a rechargeable. Two similar names w /completely different chemistry....
CR-V3 batteries are based on a non-rechargeable lithium battery chemistry, with a nominal voltage of 3 V (the same as 2 alkaline AA batteries). Rechargeable lithium-ion RCR-V3 batteries, with a nominal voltage of 3.7 V, are also available.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CR-V3
Pentax choice to ban the use of Cr-v3 seems quite prudent or at least a liveable conservative move. Why they ACTUALLY did this is not known BTW. Seems the majority that are complaining about this battery issue DO NOT own a K200. Funny isn't it.
Next battery type please......


Last edited by jeffkrol; 07-31-2008 at 08:53 AM.
01-05-2010, 06:19 AM   #35
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Regulated cr-v3 are working with k200d, faster AF

QuoteOriginally posted by RiceHigh Quote
I did it before seven years ago. There are two naked 3V cells inside each CR-V3. The naked cell is covered by metal where most of it is of the negative polarity. So, it is very easy to be short circuited. So, the simple thing to do is to use PVC tapes (those used for electrical connections) to wrap the extracted cells once the outer shell is removed and then everything is done!
I tried too but the cells of mine cr-v3s are insulated. There is an electronic regulator on the one side of the pair with contacts for the charger. On the other side are the + and - contacts. So I removed the casing, taped the cells together and they are working fine with my k200d.

The body drives the focus ring way faster with cr-v3s, hence the faster AF. (With the lens cap put on and shutter pressed it is obvious how faster the focus ring goes from close distance to infinity and back.)
01-05-2010, 02:19 PM   #36
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A RiceLow thread from the depths of hell.

Regardless, shouldn't there be two 1.5v cells in each rather than two 3v cells?

Do you have pics of what you did to get these to work?
01-09-2010, 07:22 AM   #37
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k200d and cr-v3

I don't know if in a cr-v3 package the two cells are 3v, or are by 1.5v but the result is one battery of 3,2 v (when charged).
I can't photo them for now, because I don't have spare batteries but in the future I will post a picture.
I don't advise anyone to do this at home, and if done the responsibillity is not mine.
I am just saying how satisfyed I am with my set of batteries, which without the blocking parts I am able to use with my own k200d.
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