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08-17-2008, 06:21 AM   #16
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If IS is important to you, then Pentax is a no-brainer. In-camera IS will save you a lot of money on lenses as you don't have to shell out a premium for the IS lenses like you do with Canon. A good example of this is the price difference between the Canon 17-55 IS and Pentax 16-50. Brand new, the 17-55 is $1030, while the 16-50 is $699.95. Another example is the 70-200/2.8--the Canon IS version runs $1699 while the Tamron and Sigma versions for Pentax run $699 and $799, respectively. You may not lose as much money on your Canon gear as you think you will.

If you make the switch, you might want to check around and get some other quotes on trading your Canon gear from places like keh.com, Adorama, and B&H before deciding what to do with it. You may also be able to get rid of it locally via Craigslist.

You might consider planning an outing with your friend who has the Pentax gear just so you can try his and he can explain how things work with the Pentax system. Hands-on experience will be valuable in your decision-making process.

If you haven't already done so, check out the Film SLR and SLR lens sections on the forum; you'll get a lot of valuable info on which film SLR bodies and lenses that people around here really like.

If you do decide you want to switch, I would wait until after the wedding in September before doing so, if I were in your shoes. You're already familiar with your current system, so assuming that this is a paying gig, why make it more difficult by having to learn a new system in a hurry?

HTH,
Heather

08-17-2008, 08:56 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by hwblanks Quote
If IS is important to you, then Pentax is a no-brainer. In-camera IS will save you a lot of money on lenses as you don't have to shell out a premium for the IS lenses like you do with Canon. A good example of this is the price difference between the Canon 17-55 IS and Pentax 16-50. Brand new, the 17-55 is $1030, while the 16-50 is $699.95. Another example is the 70-200/2.8--the Canon IS version runs $1699 while the Tamron and Sigma versions for Pentax run $699 and $799, respectively. You may not lose as much money on your Canon gear as you think you will.

If you make the switch, you might want to check around and get some other quotes on trading your Canon gear from places like keh.com, Adorama, and B&H before deciding what to do with it. You may also be able to get rid of it locally via Craigslist.

You might consider planning an outing with your friend who has the Pentax gear just so you can try his and he can explain how things work with the Pentax system. Hands-on experience will be valuable in your decision-making process.

If you haven't already done so, check out the Film SLR and SLR lens sections on the forum; you'll get a lot of valuable info on which film SLR bodies and lenses that people around here really like.

If you do decide you want to switch, I would wait until after the wedding in September before doing so, if I were in your shoes. You're already familiar with your current system, so assuming that this is a paying gig, why make it more difficult by having to learn a new system in a hurry?

HTH,
Heather
Thanks everyone for your comments. I forgot to mention that IS, in addition to weather sealing, is one of my sticking points. While in the lens IS is supposed to be more effective - body IS to me just makes more sense. Then your not re-buying IS everytime your purchase a lens. You only have to pay for it once. My biggest debate right now is which Canon or Sigma 70-200 lens because I really want IS and it's WAAAAYYY too expensive. Lens IS may be more effective, but it's also a money maker for the camera manufacturers, over and over and over and over... Besides, body IS will improve as time goes by.

Weather sealing is also important to me. I love going out in the forrest for walks, and I don't want to have to deal with slight rain or snow bothering my equipment. I know I can use a rain sleave with my Canon gear, but that just gets in the way. I'd love to go photo walking on city streets in inclement weather too.

I am a little nervous about the auto focus system on Pentax. I have read that it's a little slower. I think I'll spend a lot more time in the camera shop messing around before I do anything.

I also appreciate your suggestion about waiting until after the wedding. Last night I decided that I'm just too close. Even if I could parse out my Canon gear and buy Pentax stuff in time, I'd have very little time to re-learn how to use everything. I'm just to close to the wedding for that. I know where all my buttons and switches are right now - often without even looking. I don't want to be second guessing that during an important event. I went ahead and dropped another $350 some odd dollars last night on the grip and extra batteries for Canon gear...and some CF cards on super sale over at Amazon.

If I trade, and I still might, I'll wait until after the wedding. I'd also really like to see what Pentax comes up with during Photokina... and Canon too. Could sway me either way.
08-17-2008, 12:07 PM   #18
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With wedding and portraits you might want to consider adding instead a medium format starter system usually a body and "normal" lense (75-80mm) and rent extra lenses usually a tele or zoom in either short or long range...naturally you factor in your rentals in your costs/charges.
08-17-2008, 05:33 PM   #19
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Regarding viewing ISO and frames remaining.
Set camera to show ISO, then after each shot frames shows for half a second or so. Or you press OK button and Frames remaining shows in top LCD AND viewfinder.

The 2 dials are very configurable, eg. in Av mode set the rear dial to Av and the front to either ISO or shutter speed.

If you're doing sport I'd stick with Canon (because of focussing and FPS, though this is not from experience just what I've read), though sport is still possible of course.

12-11-2008, 11:52 PM   #20
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So I'm back... and still no switch. BUUUUUUTTTTT. With the K20D price dropped so cheap, especially over at Adorama, I'm thinking of starting the process tomorrow. I'll start by picking up one K20D kit, sell off some of my Canon gear, buy some lenses, sell more stuff, buy a backup K20D.

I figure now's a good time since the wedding is done and I have no family portraits booked anytime soon.

I'm really looking forward to the weather sealing (I've already had two times in the last month I wanted to go out and shoot in the snow/rain but was deterred) and the in camera IS.

Like it or not, I'm not a full blown pro at this point, and even if I was, the K20D would do a fine job. In the meantime, I'm trying to break into various elements of the photography biz and equipment is expensive. Being able to get great lenses for much cheaper than their Canon counterparts and still have IS is great.

So, I think I'll begin the transformation process tomorrow. Any idea how to best handle the sale of my Canon gear? I'm thinking eBay...
12-12-2008, 03:02 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by psykon99 Quote
Thanks everyone for your comments. I forgot to mention that IS, in addition to weather sealing, is one of my sticking points. While in the lens IS is supposed to be more effective - body IS to me just makes more sense. Then your not re-buying IS everytime your purchase a lens. You only have to pay for it once. My biggest debate right now is which Canon or Sigma 70-200 lens because I really want IS and it's WAAAAYYY too expensive. Lens IS may be more effective, but it's also a money maker for the camera manufacturers, over and over and over and over... Besides, body IS will improve as time goes by.

Weather sealing is also important to me. I love going out in the forrest for walks, and I don't want to have to deal with slight rain or snow bothering my equipment. I know I can use a rain sleave with my Canon gear, but that just gets in the way. I'd love to go photo walking on city streets in inclement weather too.

I am a little nervous about the auto focus system on Pentax. I have read that it's a little slower. I think I'll spend a lot more time in the camera shop messing around before I do anything.

I also appreciate your suggestion about waiting until after the wedding. Last night I decided that I'm just too close. Even if I could parse out my Canon gear and buy Pentax stuff in time, I'd have very little time to re-learn how to use everything. I'm just to close to the wedding for that. I know where all my buttons and switches are right now - often without even looking. I don't want to be second guessing that during an important event. I went ahead and dropped another $350 some odd dollars last night on the grip and extra batteries for Canon gear...and some CF cards on super sale over at Amazon.

If I trade, and I still might, I'll wait until after the wedding. I'd also really like to see what Pentax comes up with during Photokina... and Canon too. Could sway me either way.

If weather sealing is an important feature, then it rules out all third party 70-200f2.8 offering, leaving you with no other choice than the DA*50-135f2.8.

Your other choice on Canon is the 70-200f4L IS that is not that much more expensive than the Pentax DA* and also offers weather sealing (and then some...)
12-12-2008, 04:22 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by lol101 Quote
If weather sealing is an important feature, then it rules out all third party 70-200f2.8 offering, leaving you with no other choice than the DA*50-135f2.8.

Your other choice on Canon is the 70-200f4L IS that is not that much more expensive than the Pentax DA* and also offers weather sealing (and then some...)
@lol101

Yes, and mount it on what reasonably priced Canon body to make a w.s. system?

@psykon99

Whilst of course I can't deny the need for a xx-2xx zoom maybe DA*50-135 + DA*200 could be an alternative. Those 2 can be bought in time and provide f2.8 + w.s. with the K20D + grip.

Regards,
Radu
12-12-2008, 07:54 AM   #23
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Weather sealing will not always be important - so I can lean on Sigma for a third party 70-200 solution, but I'll likely start with the 50-135 f/2.8. I hear it's a great lens.

12-12-2008, 08:56 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by psykon99 Quote
Weather sealing will not always be important - so I can lean on Sigma for a third party 70-200 solution, but I'll likely start with the 50-135 f/2.8. I hear it's a great lens.
It most certainly is. I carry 2 bodies, one with 16-50, one with 50-135. Occasionally I use my 300 F4.5 when shooting sport or wildlife, but for any conceivable event use the above combination covers the bases.

I have also cropped the shots by up to 50% - its still a 7MP image so is fine for albums etc. Plus Pentax are bringing out a teleconverter soon that works with SDM lenses. This will give you a 75-200 F4 lens on the cheap
12-12-2008, 09:19 AM   #25
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Good to hear. I'm a little nervous about the transition. I do enjoy my Canon products, but I'm appalled by the value per dollar comparisons. It's just too expensive to be a Canon shooter. With Pentax, I'll get a better viewfinder, a weather sealed body, and every lens I put on the camera will be stabilized - and it all costs less to boot! There may be some give and take with image quality under various conditions, and there's the question of low light AF, but overall, I think Pentax is the better value.
12-12-2008, 09:53 AM   #26
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psykon99,

I have no idea what degree of a pro you are or what you will become (I'm not a pro in any sense, so "degree" may even be inaccurate as a description of professionals), but after having read through this thread, I noticed that nobody mentioned Canon's (or Nikon's, for that matter) support for professionals. I bring this up only from what I've read on photog forums, so if someone can reliably contradict this, please do. One advantage I've seen mentioned several times in regards to Canon/Nikon vs other brands for professional use is the support for speedy camera and lens replacements/repairs (Canon/Nikon have it, others don't). This may only apply to hardcore pros, but this may be something to consider, depending on where you see yourself.

Todd
12-12-2008, 10:07 AM   #27
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Thanks for the concern, but you could hardly call me a pro at this point. I've shot one wedding, two family portrait sessions, one church directory, and a model session. I'm trying to make money at this on the side, but the business isn't exactly rolling in, and I'm not at a point where I can focus on it full time.

Also, a huge hurdle is cost of quality equipment aquisition. That's where Pentax shines over Canon. Canon's stuff is great - but it will all set you back huge sums of cash. For example: for a 70-200 f/2.8 IS telezoom, I'm looking at ~ $1,700. Right now, I use the Sigma version because it's way cheaper for the f/2.8 but I don't have IS which I really need (in addition to the f/2.9). With Pentax, the equivalent is the 50-135 f/2.8, which is substantially less than $1,000, AND it's IS due to the camera body. I can live with the loss of range from 135 to 200. If I really need the extra boost, I'll pick up Sigma's version again for the Pentax body.

At my income level to side job ratio, value per dollar is everything.
12-12-2008, 12:36 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
Funny you should bring that up. In the 1950s, when the Korean war was being waged, a little company called Nippon Kogaku was handing out lenses to war photographers to put onto their Leica rangefinders.
The lenses were of superb quality, and when the war ended and these photographers went home, they remembered how good those lenses were. When Nikon cameras started washing ashore, they had a market, willing and waiting to purchase their cameras, photographers who had either used their lenses, or who knew someone who had........
I used rangefinders in Africa in that era. The one 35mm Nikon lens I had bought fit my Contax IIA fine (same mount) though the rangefinder coupling wasn't precise. But the depth of field covered that. The 35mm was sharper than anything Zeiss was making at the time, faster too. A couple of years later I bought a Nikon SP, a much faster-handling camera than the Contax. Wish I still had it.

However, it's news to me that Nikon lenses fit the Leica rangefinder. Are you sure about this?

Richard
12-12-2008, 02:18 PM   #29
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Sounds to me like you have already convinced yourself to the benefits of Pentax kit.
12-12-2008, 04:58 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by psykon99 Quote
Weather sealing will not always be important - so I can lean on Sigma for a third party 70-200 solution, but I'll likely start with the 50-135 f/2.8. I hear it's a great lens.
FWIW, even though a non-sealed lens is vulnerable to bad weather/dust, a non-sealed body is far more so. There are just too many points of entry that can seriously mess up a modern DSLR. I've used a K200D in light rain, and a dust storm once, with a semi-disposable 18-55 on it, and it came through like a champ. I would *not* subject my DA Limiteds to the same conditions. The 18-55 refuses to die no matter what I subject it to, although it took a while after the dust storm to recover smooth zooming action. Just something to consider in regards to the advantages of a sealed body.
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