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08-20-2008, 08:36 AM   #1
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Exposure question

I own an ist DS and am very happy with the overall perforamnce of the camera.
However, when I taking sunset photos, I sometimes find that the resulting photo will be distorted. By this I mean that the setting sun will produce large pixels of a solid color, such as yellow or orange. I am shooting jpegs only.
I welcome both explanations and suggestions...Thanks..Charles

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08-20-2008, 08:43 AM   #2
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Post you photo so we can see what you are talking about.
08-20-2008, 08:45 AM   #3
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Can you post an example? It sounds like blown highlights, where the pixels are oversaturated and just scream "surrender" and max out. This will result in a large, (usually) white blob with no features or details.

Jpegs have less exposure lattitude since it discards some pixel data in the compression, but even shooting raw probably wouldn't work in the case you're describing. Raw will give you more exposure lattitude, but not that much.

Again, an example would be very helpful.
08-20-2008, 09:42 AM   #4
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08-20-2008, 09:46 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Charles1 Quote
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jpeg compression, rounding errors, blown red channel. localized blooming, posterization, ect. Take your pick. Shoot RAW , edit in 16bit then convert a copy to jpg....
What your seeing is fairly normal for digital as far as I'm concerned.
08-23-2008, 01:41 AM   #6
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Perhaps you could try a neutral-density graduate filter of .06 and meter off of the trees. That could help the blow out.
08-23-2008, 02:57 AM   #7
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Shooting into a sunset, you'll be metering on one thing and the other thing will either be a shadow or a blown highlight. Too much contrast - hence these settings are great for silhouettes.

If you want everything well exposed, you'll need to wait until the light in the sky is a similar intensity to the illumination of the subject - for landscapes, best to wait until after sunset, and you get the variety of soft dusk colours - for smaller subjects, you can use fill flash to bring out the details.

See how you go...
08-23-2008, 10:41 AM   #8
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Another alternative is to set your camera for a bracketed set of exposures and use something like Photomatix to do an HDR image. Your camera is exposing for the sunset. Use RAW to pick up a bit of detail on each end of the exposure range, not jpeg, when lighting is difficult.

08-23-2008, 01:01 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
Another alternative is to set your camera for a bracketed set of exposures and use something like Photomatix to do an HDR image. Your camera is exposing for the sunset. Use RAW to pick up a bit of detail on each end of the exposure range, not jpeg, when lighting is difficult.

Great suggestion. Here is a link to a good tutorial for doing it with Photoshop......Digital Blending

Just have to be careful not to get carried away when doing an HDR. There is a fine line between making the image come together and creating a very unrealistic image.
08-23-2008, 02:35 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by navcom Quote
Great suggestion. Here is a link to a good tutorial for doing it with Photoshop......Digital Blending

Just have to be careful not to get carried away when doing an HDR. There is a fine line between making the image come together and creating a very unrealistic image.
I have seen some where it was overdone, and can only agree with you wholeheartedly. There still needs to be tonal changes over the image to retain the feel that caused one to take the image in the first place.
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