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08-17-2018, 03:53 PM   #46
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mikesul Quote
UV and other protective filters are a kind of photographic double bind.
I was thinking the same thing just a few days ago. I carry a 72mm UV filter for my Sigma 17-70/2.8-4 (C) but wince when I consider having to use it.


Steve

08-17-2018, 04:25 PM   #47
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One thing I do after shooting in the rain, is "pump" the camera with a suitable WR lens...the 18-135 is excellent at this.

How to do this?

In a dry location, place the camera with the mic port in the lowest position, and slowly extend the Zoom.
When the Zoom is extended, Zoom in relatively fast, and you will find that the pressure created with "Pumping" will expel most moisture that may have found it's way into the camera.

The camera will also "wheeze" and if there is moisture, it will "wheeze" differently.

It's also a good way to check to see how relatively sealed your camera is.
Doing the same procedure as above, with your finger on the mic port will give you a sense of the overall seal condition.

Also, when flying or rapidly changing alititude, open and closing those ports can equalize the camera.
08-17-2018, 06:58 PM - 1 Like   #48
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
Yep, I read ya Apologies, I didn't mean for my post to come across as a challenge, though I now realise it might have seemed that way
No problem, Mike. I did not see it that way. I was just continuing the thread. I thought we were in close agreement.
08-25-2018, 11:35 AM   #49
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It is great WR knowledge with a lot of sense. I learn here a lot. Thank you!

08-29-2018, 01:57 PM   #50
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Excellent article Steve.

I have taken my gear into the wet weather many times with no problems (which led to over-confidence). I am always careful to hand dry it immediately afterwards, remove the lenses, disconnect the grip, open up all the doors, remove batteries and cards, and let it air out overnight.

Recently I was using two K-3s with grips for a rainy soccer match; my primary with the 55-300WR, and the secondary with the 18-135WR. The hot shoe and other covers were in place. Both were on Blackrapid straps, so at rest they were upside down, but the 18-135 was nearly always in that position while the 55-300 was in my hands. I think the 18-135 and K-3 got a lot of run-off from my arm, and the few times I used the zoom helped water to enter and run down into the prism area. I can't prove it contributed, but I would suggest to keep the body upright (or slightly lens down) in bad weather.

The first hint something was wrong was the shots gradually becoming more and more overexposed (you could add this to your list of symptoms). When I reassembled the next day, the light meter was completely non-functional (everything else worked fine in manual mode). I tried to let it dry for a few more days with no change, so it is now in service.

From now on I will only carry one body in wet weather so it is easier to keep it protected.

Last edited by klh; 08-30-2018 at 10:20 AM.
10-10-2019, 12:39 PM   #51
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The weakest point of the gear is often the user. Shooting outside during rain don't makes a lot of fun
10-20-2019, 01:57 PM - 1 Like   #52
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I have only just got around to reading this post and its a very good guide.

Only thing I would like to chime in with, although technically not the camera /lens, is care also needs to be taken with your camera bag / pack, in that...
1. Different bags have differing amounts of weather resistance. Don't assume that if it comes with a rain hood its 100% weather proof. Good brands with "All weather" rating are a good start.
2. Hopefully fairly obvious but if it starts to rain and your bag has a rain hood - do use it as most bags will seep water after a time without it. Also the hood needs to be fully wrapped around the pack.
3. Don't put you bag down on very wet surfaces (and definitely not standing water). Even "all weather" bags will leak through their bases if put in standing water. For packs same goes for lying it straps down in water.
4. If there is strong possibility of walking in a lot of rain, consider put your gear in water tight bags within your camera bag / pack.
5. After being in the rain (especially for extended periods) make sure you take all your gear out and check it for moisture. Then open bag up and put in a warm and dry place. Worst thing to do is put a damp bag away with gear still in it.
6. Obviously opening the bag in rain is to be avoided - unless you are under some good shelter.

I have once ended up damp finding its way into a pack during a walk in fairly heavy rain. The pack had a rain hood which was in place. The moisture got in because the rain ran down the back of my rain coat (and jacket hood) and down the back of the pack (which is not covered by the hood). My camera gear was fine but I put it in a warm dry place to ensure it was completely dry (separate to where I put the damp pack of course). It was not a particularly good pack at the time (forget the brand) and probably other packs will handle this better but if I got caught in heavy rain again I would certainly check the back of the pack and consider using a poncho over self and pack.
10-21-2019, 12:22 PM - 1 Like   #53
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QuoteOriginally posted by kiwi_jono Quote

I have once ended up damp finding its way into a pack during a walk in fairly heavy rain. The pack had a rain hood which was in place. The moisture got in because the rain ran down the back of my rain coat (and jacket hood) and down the back of the pack (which is not covered by the hood). My camera gear was fine but I put it in a warm dry place to ensure it was completely dry (separate to where I put the damp pack of course). It was not a particularly good pack at the time (forget the brand) and probably other packs will handle this better but if I got caught in heavy rain again I would certainly check the back of the pack and consider using a poncho over self and pack.
Great advice - Thanks!

10-21-2019, 01:27 PM - 2 Likes   #54
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QuoteOriginally posted by kiwi_jono Quote
I have only just got around to reading this post and its a very good guide.

Only thing I would like to chime in with, although technically not the camera /lens, is care also needs to be taken with your camera bag / pack, in that...
1. Different bags have differing amounts of weather resistance. Don't assume that if it comes with a rain hood its 100% weather proof. Good brands with "All weather" rating are a good start.
2. Hopefully fairly obvious but if it starts to rain and your bag has a rain hood - do use it as most bags will seep water after a time without it. Also the hood needs to be fully wrapped around the pack.
3. Don't put you bag down on very wet surfaces (and definitely not standing water). Even "all weather" bags will leak through their bases if put in standing water. For packs same goes for lying it straps down in water.
4. If there is strong possibility of walking in a lot of rain, consider put your gear in water tight bags within your camera bag / pack.
5. After being in the rain (especially for extended periods) make sure you take all your gear out and check it for moisture. Then open bag up and put in a warm and dry place. Worst thing to do is put a damp bag away with gear still in it.
6. Obviously opening the bag in rain is to be avoided - unless you are under some good shelter.

I have once ended up damp finding its way into a pack during a walk in fairly heavy rain. The pack had a rain hood which was in place. The moisture got in because the rain ran down the back of my rain coat (and jacket hood) and down the back of the pack (which is not covered by the hood). My camera gear was fine but I put it in a warm dry place to ensure it was completely dry (separate to where I put the damp pack of course). It was not a particularly good pack at the time (forget the brand) and probably other packs will handle this better but if I got caught in heavy rain again I would certainly check the back of the pack and consider using a poncho over self and pack.
Yes, this is great advice.

The only mobile equipment storage I completely trust in wet weather is my waterproof hard cases. I've been on a few boat trips where one of my cases got very wet from both rain and spray, and upon opening it at my destination there had been - as expected - absolutely zero ingress of water. Allegedly, they'll even withstand complete submersion for a certain amount of time, though that's something I hope never to test. But, of course, they're no use for carrying gear on a shoot - they're strictly for getting it to and from a location. Beyond that, I find my Kata bag's rain cover does a good job in keeping most of the bag dry, though I wouldn't want to be carrying it in heavy rain for long, for the reasons you mention.

I don't think anyone's mentioned the "type" of rain (for want of a better word) yet, so I'll raise it. Big, heavy rain-drops should make anyone think carefully about their gear and bags, but very fine drizzle can be equally drenching without the photographer noticing it. Years ago, when visiting the island of Lundy off the coast of Devon, I went out for a long walk with my camera and fitted lens, stored in a small Tamrac shoulder bag. It wasn't even raining, as such - rather, it was misty and there was an incredibly light drizzle... a "fret", really. By the time I got to my first location for taking shots, my Tamrac bag was so wet that I didn't use it for the rest of my walk. Plus, I found I had to wipe my camera and lens down almost as often as I would in heavier rain, as the standing water built up really quickly around controls, buttons, the viewfinder, lens mount etc...
10-21-2019, 03:37 PM - 3 Likes   #55
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A lot of great advice here. I have a cover for my backpack but donít use it - I use a black waterproof poncho instead to cover the whole shooting match. Looks pretty comical in the rain, like the Hunchback of Notre Dame wearing a Tilley hat.
10-21-2019, 05:48 PM - 2 Likes   #56
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
It wasn't even raining, as such - rather, it was misty and there was an incredibly light drizzle... a "fret", really.
A fret? Well I never!
10-21-2019, 06:21 PM - 2 Likes   #57
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There is a possible problem in wet environments with fully waterproof cases or bags -- and that is that sometimes they aren't, quite.

Here's an example from Antarctica. First day of the cruise, another passenger -- let's call him "Tom" -- pompously and publicly criticized me for not bringing a waterproof case during a rough tour on the Zodiac. He had his camera (a then-new Canon 7D) in a dry bag, from which it would emerge only once it was on dry land and, apparently, in better weather.

All my gear was in a Lowe-Pro AW bag, a splash-resistant but hardly waterproof backpack that sat on my feet in the bottom of the boat. We were getting splashed constantly by waves and rain. The outside of my bag was soaking wet, as was I. I kept the bag on my feet so it wouldn't be in the inch of seawater sloshing around inside the Zodiac.

Tom's bag lay in the bottom of the boat.

Bottom line: After we got back to the ship, Tom discovered his drybag had developed a pinhole leak. About half a cup of seawater had seeped in. His 7D, which had basted in the trapped water, was toast. My bag was wet to the touch inside as well, but the not being waterproof, the bag let water out as fast as it came in. All my gear needed was a wipedown.

I lost most desire for a drybag that day.
11-06-2019, 02:44 AM   #58
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Important to properly clean all accesses inside the camera after open !
11-06-2019, 04:57 AM   #59
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QuoteOriginally posted by bkpix Quote
There is a possible problem in wet environments with fully waterproof cases or bags -- and that is that sometimes they aren't, quite.

Here's an example from Antarctica. First day of the cruise, another passenger -- let's call him "Tom" -- pompously and publicly criticized me for not bringing a waterproof case during a rough tour on the Zodiac. He had his camera (a then-new Canon 7D) in a dry bag, from which it would emerge only once it was on dry land and, apparently, in better weather.

All my gear was in a Lowe-Pro AW bag, a splash-resistant but hardly waterproof backpack that sat on my feet in the bottom of the boat. We were getting splashed constantly by waves and rain. The outside of my bag was soaking wet, as was I. I kept the bag on my feet so it wouldn't be in the inch of seawater sloshing around inside the Zodiac.

Tom's bag lay in the bottom of the boat.

Bottom line: After we got back to the ship, Tom discovered his drybag had developed a pinhole leak. About half a cup of seawater had seeped in. His 7D, which had basted in the trapped water, was toast. My bag was wet to the touch inside as well, but the not being waterproof, the bag let water out as fast as it came in. All my gear needed was a wipedown.

I lost most desire for a drybag that day.
now you tell me

after I buy a dry bag

just kidding
_________________________

excellent warning about not automatically trusting the gear to be ( dare I say it ) foolproof

remember Murphy's law - " any thing that can go wrong, will go wrong " ( a pinhole leak in a dry bag comes to mind )

and Finnigan's corollary to his law " Murphy was an optimist "
11-06-2019, 05:15 AM - 1 Like   #60
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And then there's Murphy's Second Law: 'The more complicated it is, the sooner it will go wrong.'
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