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09-21-2008, 06:11 PM   #1
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Does everybody except me know this?

I finally got a 28-105 f/3.2-4.5 for my K100D, and although it lacks the absolute sharpeness of a prime lens it's plenty good for walk-around.

But then I found myself using it in an unexpected way... framing the image, and then switching to the prime for the shot.

Since I only have one other lens (50 f/1.4) it doesn't matter much at this point, but I can envision a modest range of primes to match the FL I seem to use most (35, 70, 105 ) framing with the zoom, then switching to the faster, sharper prime when I can "see" exactly the image I want. Sort of a cropping tool.

Nothing earth shaking, just an observation,
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09-21-2008, 06:57 PM   #2
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Interesting way to approach it, especially if you have 2 bodies.

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09-22-2008, 06:34 AM   #3
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What you need is one of these - Alan Gordon Enterprises | Mark Vb Director's Viewfinder

09-22-2008, 07:51 AM   #4
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It is an interesting approach. You could also mount your 50mm and use your legs as a zoom :-)

09-22-2008, 08:08 AM   #5
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Eventually you develop "the eye" and let your imagination do the framing while you switch to the appropriate prime and walk to your desired location
09-22-2008, 08:12 AM   #6
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Too many lens changes. If you want to shoot with primes, leave the zoom in the bag.
09-22-2008, 08:13 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by drabina Quote
use your legs as a zoom :-)
This changes the perspective, however, whereas using a different focal length does not.
09-22-2008, 08:27 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by audiobomber Quote
Too many lens changes. If you want to shoot with primes, leave the zoom in the bag.
Leaving it at home would be even better.

09-22-2008, 08:59 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by FHPhotographer Quote
But then I found myself using it in an unexpected way... framing the image, and then switching to the prime for the shot.

Since I only have one other lens (50 f/1.4) it doesn't matter much at this point, but I can envision a modest range of primes to match the FL I seem to use most (35, 70, 105 ) framing with the zoom, then switching to the faster, sharper prime when I can "see" exactly the image I want. Sort of a cropping tool.
I'm afraid I don't understand.

Say you start out 30 ft from the center of interest in whatever scene you want to photograph. You look through your zoom lens and determine what field of vision you want. To avoid talking about angles in degrees, let's just say that, from 30 ft away, you like the picture as you see it with the focal length set to 80mm. I understand so far.

What I don't understand is, what do you do next? You pick up your other camera - the one with the 50mm prime - and, um, what, exactly? If you stay 30 ft from the center of interest and shoot with a 50mm focal length, obviously, you're NOT going to get what you saw through the zoom lens at 80mm. I assume that you now walk forward and check the view through the camera's finder until you see the scene framed the way you want. But why not skip the first step and just do the walking around to start with - since as far as I can tell, you are going to have to walk around anyway?

Alternatively, if you're switching to the prime lens simply in order to achieve better image quality, why not save up and buy a high-quality zoom?

Will
09-22-2008, 10:06 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
What I don't understand is, what do you do next? You pick up your other camera - the one with the 50mm prime - and, um, what, exactly? If you stay 30 ft from the center of interest and shoot with a 50mm focal length, obviously, you're NOT going to get what you saw through the zoom lens at 80mm.
He was talking about eventually having a range of primes, not just a 50. So if the zoom told him 80mm, out would come the FA77, for example.

My guess is that by the time you actually build a collection of primes like that, you wouldn't need the zoom as a framing tool - you'd start to develop a sense of what field of view any focal length would give even before putting taking the camera out of the bag.

QuoteQuote:
I assume that you now walk forward and check the view through the camera's finder until you see the scene framed the way you want
Walking changes perspective - not the same as a zoom at all.

QuoteQuote:
Alternatively, if you're switching to the prime lens simply in order to achieve better image quality, why not save up and buy a high-quality zoom?
I doubt you'll find one any better that covers that particular focal length range.
09-22-2008, 10:25 AM   #11
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Agree, after awhile, you'll just know what kind of shots each lens will be able to get you.

Or you can buy that cool director's "scope" thingy from B&H that I linked to above
09-22-2008, 10:31 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
He was talking about eventually having a range of primes, not just a 50. So if the zoom told him 80mm, out would come the FA77, for example.
Ah, I see. I was sort of assuming he was using two different cameras, one with the zoom, one with the prime.

Boy, I really can't see the point of using the zoom to frame the shot, and then changing lenses. Make more sense with a film camera, as film cameras aren't as susceptible to dust as digital cameras are.


QuoteQuote:
My guess is that by the time you actually build a collection of primes like that, you wouldn't need the zoom as a framing tool - you'd start to develop a sense of what field of view any focal length would give even before putting taking the camera out of the bag.
I agree, although I think this is largely true of any experienced photographer, even those of us who work mainly with zooms. If I have about three seconds to think about it, I can guess pretty well what focal length I'm going to use with my zoom even before I put the camera up to my eye. No great accomplishment, this. Just comes from experience - like being able to guess exposure pretty closely even without a meter.


QuoteQuote:
Walking changes perspective - not the same as a zoom at all.
Yes, this is part of the original post that I didn't understand.


QuoteQuote:
I doubt you'll find one any better that covers that particular focal length range.
Well, this would take us into the primes vs zooms debate....

Will
09-22-2008, 10:38 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by WMBP Quote
I'm afraid I don't understand.

Say you start out 30 ft from the center of interest in whatever scene you want to photograph. You look through your zoom lens and determine what field of vision you want. To avoid talking about angles in degrees, let's just say that, from 30 ft away, you like the picture as you see it with the focal length set to 80mm. I understand so far.

What I don't understand is, what do you do next? You pick up your other camera - the one with the 50mm prime - and, um, what, exactly? If you stay 30 ft from the center of interest and shoot with a 50mm focal length, obviously, you're NOT going to get what you saw through the zoom lens at 80mm. I assume that you now walk forward and check the view through the camera's finder until you see the scene framed the way you want. But why not skip the first step and just do the walking around to start with - since as far as I can tell, you are going to have to walk around anyway?

Alternatively, if you're switching to the prime lens simply in order to achieve better image quality, why not save up and buy a high-quality zoom?

Will
There are a couple of assumptions at work: one, you can't close the distance to use say a 35 or 50; or, you want to play around with perspective; or it's more fun this way.
In any case, the zoom is used to frame the image and do some test exposures, then when you have your "best" image, read the FL (in your example 80mm) and pick a prime that's a close to 80 as possible (say a 77mm). Now you have the assumed superior (?) resolution and speed of the prime to get the shot.
Yeah it would be easier to have a good fast zoom, or, just stick to the primes and learn them until you can mix and match.
I'm not trying to tear down the church here, just suggesting something that seemed interesting,
FHPhotogapher
09-22-2008, 10:42 AM   #14
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well, maybe...

QuoteOriginally posted by egordon99 Quote
Yeah, that would do the same thing but $700 seems a bit much for what amounts to a learner's tool,
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09-22-2008, 11:31 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by FHPhotographer Quote
Yeah, that would do the same thing but $700 seems a bit much for what amounts to a learner's tool,
FHPhotog
This is no learner's tool my friend...professional film directors use this to visualize the set through the camera's lens, composing shots, checking lighting etc. They use this portable tool because cameras the camera setup is often bulky and laden with tripods and extra equipment. For example.
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