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03-09-2019, 06:19 AM   #16
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I move from K-5 to KP and never regret it. The low light is way better than the K5 . The top dial are also fine for me and better than the K5. The grip is very personal, and you should not make a choice for other peoples opinion. For me the grip is very good.

03-09-2019, 10:53 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by zippythezip Quote
I have not used it for quite a while and went out and bought myself a K5IIS and that is a pure joy of a camera for me. I looked at the KP but after seeing it takes the same battery it puts me off, wish they used the same K5 battery.
Yup, K5 user here. I was intrigued by the KP, but put off by the fact that it uses the same smaller battery from their second-rate line of cameras. What were they thinking?
03-10-2019, 01:25 PM - 3 Likes   #18
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"Second-rate" is an insulting term in the context of the K-70 - "second tier" might be more appropriate and respectful to Pentax, but even then the K-70 has several features that make it a superior image maker compared with the K-5 series. It is a fabulous camera, particularly for its price point - just look at its feature list, which includes several only found on high-price models from other companies. I too would have preferred the larger D-Li90 battery, but it is not a major problem; just take along a charged spare and keep an eye on the battery meter. (Also see post #8.)

Philip
03-10-2019, 02:02 PM - 2 Likes   #19
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I went from the K-5 to the K-5 IIs to the K-70. The first upgrade was for the improved AF under artificial lighting and the lack of an AA filter and it certainly satisfied my needs. The last upgrade, even though the K-70 is considered a lower tier body model than the single-digit models was really a revelation. The improved resolution, high-iso capacity and articulated screen were a boon and the extended long exposure capability (from 30 seconds on the K-5 series to 300 seconds on the K-70) was absolutely crucial to me for shooting with a big stopper without having to use a remote. I do carry an extra pair of batteries but they are small and quick to charge as well so I don't consider that an issue. The IQ of the K-70 is more than sufficient, especially if you mostly shoot raw like I do. (even though the jpegs are nothing to sneeze at either)

I really came to love the K-70 for its bang-for-buck ratio - it performs way above its price.

03-10-2019, 02:17 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by kypfer Quote
With "almost" being significant!

I took this path, and my K-70 gives me some fantastic images, but I've had to learn how to hold the little thing! By making the K-70 more compact (which caused the loss of the top display) the camera is now much more critical to hold correctly ... especially noticeable when using a long telephoto.
The K-70 didn't "lose" the top LCD; it is the latest member of the K-n0 family {K-30, K-50, K-S2}, which never had a top LCD. It also has the controls and build quality from that line. The KP has the same controls the K-1ii does and close to that build quality.
03-10-2019, 03:24 PM - 4 Likes   #21
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I have had the K-5 AND the K-5 IIs (without AA filter and with improved AF with some lenses) for some time. I got both new in good deals as the newer model came in. Then I replaced my lightweight model, the K-r with a much upgraded KS-2, which physical design-wise, holding, controls, screen, etc. is much like its successor the K-70 except the KS-2 is a little smaller and lighter yet. I later also acquired the KP. For me these designs represent an ideal trio. I enjoy each for what it offers that will satisfy a need that it will best fill.

As to holding, there may be an adjustment to be made, but I was brought along in the days when my SLR body had no grip of its own. My first Pentax model was the compact metal-bodied ME Super. I used it with both compact pancake lenses and with longer, heavier lenses, so I had to learn basic proper holding techniques. Under Popular Photography's old staff, this was sometimes a featured topic, with Herbert Keppler aptly demonstrating. It did not change with the arrival of AF bodies having a built-in grip of various sorts.

To this day I hold by supporting the camera from underneath with the left hand, in a way so that my thumb and finger can manipulate the lens for zooming and/or MF if needed. This, along with keeping my elbows close in provides good stable support, while my right hand simply stabilizes laterally while operating most of the camera's controls. Thus the grip design is less of a factor in the shooting position. The grip design then for me is more of a factor in general handling other than the shooting position. With larger lenses, I will still support from underneath with the left hand, but will be gripping the lens itself when in the shooting position in a way for availability of the lens controls. Having a more substantial camera grip facilitates general handling better, and a weightier camera body provides better balance for general handling with such lenses.

Among these three designs, I select the K-S-2 when I need the smallest possible ensemble with very high quality imaging, 2-edial controls and a fine 100% VF. It will even fit into a large jacket pocket together with a small lens. Even with a zoom lens if using the DA-L 18-50mm- imagine that! Take that, APS-C mirrorless models costing several times more!! Also if I will need the articulating screen for shooting from odd angles, or its special hold and shutter release for doing a selfie with a friend. The anti-moire simulator works well with the models having it, if needed.

If I will need the heftier body with its full set of on-body controls and top LCD screen for making extra-quick adjustments, I will take my K-5 or K-5 IIs. I recently shot a HS wrestling tournament where a friend was a team coach. I took my original K-5 with my DA 18-135mm lens and AF 540 FGZ flash. Although I have both K-5 models set up to +2 for sharpness and Fine Sharpening added, the slightly reduced fine detail of the K-5's AA filter was no issue for this use, and its less reliable AF was not at all so with this lens, which is very quick on any of my camera's. For portraiture I would also select this model with a good portrait lens, since having the AA filter could be useful, and extra-fine detail is often contra-indicated for this use.

For most other situations where the K-5 design features are useful, I select the K-5 IIs with its excellent detailed image quality, and better AF with some lenses. With much longer or heavier lenses, I might install the optional battery grip for ideal balance for general handling. I often pack this camera along as a second camera to my KP, and its battery grip too. The K-5 battery grip can take AA lithiums in case I've let my dedicated batteries run low.

The KP has become my most often-used body. Image quality, metering, SR, and low-light performance are superb. I find handling is excellent. The thumb rest is much better than the KS-2 or the K-70. Controls design is excellent, in some ways not as good but in other ways better than the K-5. Out of camera images are exceptional. Fine sharpening is implemented as with the other models, but level is left set at the +1 default of the "Bright" Custom Image menu with "fine Sharpening" added. There are numerous refinements over the K-70. If using say my larger DA* 50-135mm f/2.8 lens, I find the largest size supplied grip to be just fine for general handling. With smaller lenses like the DA 20-40mm f/2.8-4 Limited, any of the limited primes, the smallest grip is just fine. If using a larger, heavier lens, like the DA* 200mm f/2.8 or the FA* 300mm f/4.5 I might slap on the KP's optional battery grip, which provides better balance for general handling, and loads of battery life, yet the combined weight is about the same as the K-3 II alone. Otherwise, as to the smaller battery, it contributes to having the more compact camera and it is very quick to slip in an easy-to-carry spare.

Last edited by mikesbike; 03-10-2019 at 06:22 PM.
03-10-2019, 04:05 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by mtl_pentaxian Quote
Yup, K5 user here. I was intrigued by the KP, but put off by the fact that it uses the same smaller battery from their second-rate line of cameras. What were they thinking?
Battery is just one aspect of "second rate" line. Cameras are about producing images and K70 is better than K5 output wise...
Smaller form factor means less autonomy but also lighter weight which matters for many clients. That is the choice done by Pentax for KP design and all in all having a spare or two is not a big deal .
03-11-2019, 07:02 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by MrB1 Quote
"Second-rate" is an insulting term in the context of the K-70 - "second tier" might be more appropriate and respectful to Pentax, but even then the K-70 has several features that make it a superior image maker compared with the K-5 series. It is a fabulous camera, particularly for its price point - just look at its feature list, which includes several only found on high-price models from other companies. I too would have preferred the larger D-Li90 battery, but it is not a major problem; just take along a charged spare and keep an eye on the battery meter. (Also see post #8.)

Philip
I don’t consider the KP second-tier but rather the K-“double digit” models.

It’s unfortunate that Pentax borrowed a spec from its second-tier models (smaller, lower capacity battery) for a first-tier model like the KP. I would already be a KP owner were it not for that design blunder.

Not everyone wants to fuss with carrying around spare batteries and having the equivalent of range anxiety that EV drivers have with their cars.

It’s telling that the KP grip uses the proper bigger battery. How goofy is that?

Having to manage two battery formats for the same camera body is not good design, in my opinion.

And if, like me, you don’t want to add the bulk of the grip, you’re stuck using the smaller battery from the “second-tier” line and all the while resenting the fact that the batteries I already have for my K-01, K5 and previous first-tier models I’ve owned are completely useless.

And a note on the improved output of the K-70 over the K5, it's all well and good for the pixel peepers among us, but what about the “aperture block” problem that has plagued the earlier K-“double digit” cameras?


Last edited by BigMackCam; 03-11-2019 at 10:29 AM. Reason: Edited to be constructive and respectful
03-11-2019, 10:04 AM   #24
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I have been noticing the improvement in my images from the KP without peeping at a single pixel or measurebating anything. That is not to say I don't still like and admire my results out of my K-5 IIs in shots where good detail matters- it is still a fine performer. The KP is simply a better performer.

I am not a design engineer, but I can see how the larger battery from my K-5 series would require a larger chamber and more bulge in the grip portion of the camera. One design goal of the KP is to provide an alternative DSLR answer to those seeking a more svelte camera design in mirrorless APS-C models. It was not meant to replace the K-3 II. Also, many long-time Pentax users have expressed a desire for a more compact higher-quality DSLR. Pentax wisely included in the design the ability to expand the KP's size and capacities for holding and extending its battery life even beyond that of the K-5/K-3 series with the optional battery grip, while being of similar weight as the K-3 II with no battery grip. The normal battery is so small and light it is completely pocketable, even in a shirt pocket, while remaining nearly unnoticeable. I always have one tucked into an accessory pocket of my camera belt holster along with a spare SD card.

Incidentally, you don't have to use the larger battery in the battery grip. You can instead use a second smaller one and just double the normal shooting time. The idea is flexibility. You can configure the camera according to a particular need, whether compact carrying or long-term shooting, or extensive vertical shooting, is of greater priority. I don't know of another model with this capability.

Last edited by mikesbike; 03-11-2019 at 10:17 AM.
03-11-2019, 10:32 AM - 2 Likes   #25
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Folks, please let's keep discussions and critique of equipment constructive, and avoid expressing opinions in ways that are inflammatory or insulting. Consideration for each other is appreciated.

Thank you
03-11-2019, 01:54 PM - 2 Likes   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by mtl_pentaxian Quote
It’s unfortunate that Pentax borrowed a spec from its second-tier models (smaller, lower capacity battery) for a first-tier model like the KP. I would already be a KP owner were it not for that design blunder.
Guys, a smaller battery is a function of a smaller form. Or is a Sony A9 "second tier"?

Sony NP-FZ100 Specifications
Battery type: Rechargeable Lithium-Ion power pack
Voltage: 7.2V DC
Capacity: 2280mAh or 650 shots (CIPA) with the Sony A9
Dimensions (W x H x D): 39 x 23 x 52mm
Weight: 85g

Pentax K-3 Specifications
Links
Weight: 43.7 oz (1,240 g) includes batteries, kit lens
Size: 5.2 x 3.9 x 3.1 in. (132 x 100 x 77 mm)
Waterproof: No
Waterproof Depth: n/a

So you guys are saying an A9 is second tier, based on battery size?
Get real.

Last edited by normhead; 03-11-2019 at 05:35 PM.
03-11-2019, 02:42 PM   #27
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I haven’t heard of aperture block issues on the K-70. Mine is from December 2016, 14.000 clicks and counting. I’m not worried.
03-13-2019, 04:53 AM - 1 Like   #28
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For the past couple of days I've been reading through this forum. I stopped on this thread because I was curious about the K-70, having recently acquired a K-5. If I'm out of line, I apologize, yet I've always been one to speak my mind. I am new to this Pentax Forum, and all of the "my dog is bigger than your dog" attitude, that appears on many threads, does nothing to make me feel welcome, nor does it keep me better informed about Pentax. I wanted to read about the D-70, instead, I ended up with whose battery is bigger.
03-13-2019, 07:25 AM - 3 Likes   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by ErikRuss Quote
For the past couple of days I've been reading through this forum. I stopped on this thread because I was curious about the K-70, having recently acquired a K-5. If I'm out of line, I apologize, yet I've always been one to speak my mind. I am new to this Pentax Forum, and all of the "my dog is bigger than your dog" attitude, that appears on many threads, does nothing to make me feel welcome, nor does it keep me better informed about Pentax. I wanted to read about the D-70, instead, I ended up with whose battery is bigger.
That also puzzles me, many of us carry a bag full of lenses with a 1:1 cost/weight ($/gram) ratio, why care about battery capacity when an extra cost and weigh a fraction of all the other stuff we carry with us?
03-13-2019, 09:18 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by Arbalist Quote
I bought my K5 not long after they came out and have been happy with it apart from perhaps the inclusion of an AA filter which I think at times affects the sharpness. I now feel the need to upgrade but Pentax don’t seem to have any intention of introducing anything new so that leaves me with the existing line of cameras. I don’t much like the look of the KP and it gets quite a bit of criticism over the dials and grip. This leaves the K70. Is it a decent upgrade from a K5 and am I likely to notice the difference in quality. Am I right in thinking the K70 doesn’t have an AA filter? Given the way camera prices have been going lately I think it’s quite possible anything new to replace the K3ii may be over budget anyway.
There are some interesting replies here. I have a K-5ii and a K-3. I'd rather use the K-5ii in low light situations with ISO 2000 or more. I should test this again because I've learned how to reduce the noise out of my images better than I used to. I just purchased a used K-5iis for landscapes and more. I will keep using the K-3 for birds and some macro. I do occasionally get color moire in bird feathers but because of the greater amount of pixels, it is hard to see because of the smaller sized pixels but I can clean it out with the clean color slider in topaz denoise. I wouldn't try to photograph birds with my 5iis because of possible color moire.

Something else, the noise of the K-3 is smaller and images have a finer noise grain in size compared to the K-5. I find it easy to get rid of it when I reduce my images a certain way in photoshop elements.
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