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10-04-2008, 02:45 PM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by hotrod Quote
I asked that question because i have a canon XTI which of course has underexposure problem
I would tend to doubt that as well. If you expect to simply point and shoot and get exactly the exposure you want, you're going to be disappointed with virtually *any* DSLR, as that's just not how they work.

P&S cameras try to do this, because they assume you won't understand how exposure works, that you won't know how to or want to use the controls to set exposure yourself, and that you won't accept fixing exposure curves in PP. So they will either deliberately blow out highlights in order to give you the exposure they think you might want in the shadows, or else they will underexpose when shooting but make up the difference in the JPEG processing by applying curves to bring up the highlight levels.

DSLRs will do neither of these things for you. If you want to have blown highlights to get shadow detail where you want it, you have to turn up the exposure compensation yourself. And if you want the dymamic range of the scene artificially altered to produce good shadow detail *without* blowing highlights, you will have to do it yourself in PP. That's just life with a DSLR. Any book on photography will explain the concepts behind metering; I'd suggest you pick up something like Bryan Petersons's oft-recommend "Understanding Exposure"(which I've never read, but always hear good thing about) or the National Geographic Field Guide to Photography (which I have read, and do recommend).

Bottom line, again: it is true that if you just point and shoot with a DSLR, chances are pretty good that this will produce an exposure darker than you want. But this does *not* mean the camera underexposed. It means the camera did exactly what it was designed to do - protect highlights while trying to render a scene according to traditional ISO standards - and you didn't take the steps that are necessary to override this to get the exposure you personally might have preferred.

10-04-2008, 02:55 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by FHPhotographer Quote
I'm interested if there is enough "extra" in the K200 to justify a move up from the K100 other than a 40% larger sensor that has denser photosites? I've compared them online, but I am curious how folks who have used them both say the K200 feels compared to the K100 and how it affects picture taking
I've used the K100D - my wife has one - but my upgrade was from the *istDS. For me, it was easily worth it because of SR, although I had to give up a nicer viewfinder and put up with a somewhat bigger/heavier camera (not *as* much bigger/heavier as the K10D or K20D, though). Plus, I became convinced my DS had a front focus problem with manual focus, although after buying the K200D, I eventually learned that the problem was really just that the default focus screen is not capable of showing shallow enough DOF.

Anyhow, if I had a K100D that was working, I doubt I would have bothered upgrading. But FWIW, comparing my K200D now to my wife's K100D, here's some of the things I think you *would* appreciate:

1) Orientation sensor, so no more rotating images in your browser! Sounds minor, but really, this is the #1 improvement in my book. Saves me hours of identifying vertical shots and rotating then in PP.

2) *Noticeably* quieter shutter.

3) Weather sealing. I know, if your lenses aren't sealed, value is limited. But it's still worth something, I think.

4) More resolution. Although this allegedly comes at the price of higher noise, I find that's only true when comparing at 100% - which is to say, when blowing up the K200D images far larger. Otherwise, the K200D simply has more detail.

5) Better AWB in tungsten light. Not mind-readingly great, but a noticeable improvement

6) For me, anyhow, I find the K200D grip more comfortable. That's totally personal, I realize.

7) RAW button, which I suppose is useful for JPEG shooters. Yes, JPEG shooters - RAW shooters are *already* shooting RAW, so we don't need a button to get there.

8) Some other improvements to menu layout (particularly the Fn menu) that are also probably of more value to JPEG shooters than RAW - or to people who use flash a lot.

Whether that all adds up to enough to be worth the cost, that's for you to decide.
10-04-2008, 06:01 PM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
I would tend to doubt that as well. If you expect to simply point and shoot and get exactly the exposure you want, you're going to be disappointed with virtually *any* DSLR, as that's just not how they work.

P&S cameras try to do this, because they assume you won't understand how exposure works, that you won't know how to or want to use the controls to set exposure yourself, and that you won't accept fixing exposure curves in PP. So they will either deliberately blow out highlights in order to give you the exposure they think you might want in the shadows, or else they will underexpose when shooting but make up the difference in the JPEG processing by applying curves to bring up the highlight levels.

DSLRs will do neither of these things for you. If you want to have blown highlights to get shadow detail where you want it, you have to turn up the exposure compensation yourself. And if you want the dymamic range of the scene artificially altered to produce good shadow detail *without* blowing highlights, you will have to do it yourself in PP. That's just life with a DSLR. Any book on photography will explain the concepts behind metering; I'd suggest you pick up something like Bryan Petersons's oft-recommend "Understanding Exposure"(which I've never read, but always hear good thing about) or the National Geographic Field Guide to Photography (which I have read, and do recommend).

Bottom line, again: it is true that if you just point and shoot with a DSLR, chances are pretty good that this will produce an exposure darker than you want. But this does *not* mean the camera underexposed. It means the camera did exactly what it was designed to do - protect highlights while trying to render a scene according to traditional ISO standards - and you didn't take the steps that are necessary to override this to get the exposure you personally might have preferred.
When i started with my first slr it was with a pentax and that was 9 years ago. I know my Xti isnīt a point and shoot camera and i know how to expose correctly parameters of the camera. All i do now for a correct exposure is to compensate +1 and i get a great exposure. The underexposure of the camera is a little bit to much something that the XSI dosnīt do, that iīve read.
10-05-2008, 05:45 PM   #34
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Good link...

Thanks for the link. That's the kind of real-world commentary that I was looking for,
FHPhotographer

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