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03-24-2019, 12:15 PM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
Having just shot the 35-70, 35-135, and 70-210 at an event (trying out new K-1) I can support Mike's recommendation. The 35-70 is a bag full of primes and the 70-210 isn't weak either. The 35-135 is not in their class IMHO.

My other recommendation is to take as wide a lens as possible, even if MF, with you for the K-1. I took a Vivitar 19/3.8 that is MF and am very happy that I did for the group shots. It's very light and small weighing only 200g with caps.
Good advice, thanks! Rokinon 8mm is as wide as I can go. I also have a Cosina 24mm which renders beautifully on the K-1. The 18-55 lens will be going anyway. You're right, there's not a huge amount of space on the summit, so for a group shot by the survey marker, it would make sense to have a wide-angle option!

"Bag full of primes" is a perfect description of the 35-70.

03-24-2019, 12:16 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by AstroDave Quote
Unless there is something for which the telephoto is needed (zooming in on the rest of the trekking wedding party!?), I think wide(r) angle is going to be better. You probably won't be flying high in the 'copter, so not far from the ground/scenery.
Flying height restrictions means we'll be a fair distance from the walkers, so I think I'll need the reach. One the one camera at least.
03-24-2019, 12:17 PM   #33
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I personally never found the F 35-70 that good. Certainly not noticeably better than the 35-135 at f8 which seems a likely f stop outdoors. I realize this makes me a heretic. But I can also say that the consensus in the days of film was that the 35-70 was only ok.
03-24-2019, 12:57 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
I personally never found the F 35-70 that good. Certainly not noticeably better than the 35-135 at f8 which seems a likely f stop outdoors. I realize this makes me a heretic. But I can also say that the consensus in the days of film was that the 35-70 was only ok.
I've had 4 copies of the 35-70 and two of the have been fantastic, one was ok, and one was not sharp.

03-24-2019, 12:59 PM   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
I've had 4 copies of the 35-70 and two of the have been fantastic, one was ok, and one was not sharp.
That could account for it. I only ever used one copy. I doubt my pals saw more than 2 more.
03-24-2019, 02:25 PM   #36
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Hello again Mark.

In light of new information I'm going to change my advice; it seems you have other lenses you didn't mention initially, and you didn't make it clear how much you prefer the 35-70 over the 35-135.

Use the lenses you like best. It will give you more confidence, which for event portraiture especially can help you get better results. So the 35-70 it should be. Which tele-zoom you take should likewise be dictated by your personal preference. I suspect 210mm on crop is probably long enough if that is your favourite.

I agree that something wider than 18mm on crop would be useful. The 8mm fisheye is overkill, but that Cosina 24 should probably find a place in the bag just in case.

For shooting out of the helicopter, ensure you have a really secure carrying system. In Antarctica I was frequently leaning over open ocean and always a second leash to catch the camera in case option 1 somehow failed....
03-24-2019, 03:06 PM - 4 Likes   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by AstroDave Quote
Unless there is something for which the telephoto is needed (zooming in on the rest of the trekking wedding party!?), I think wide(r) angle is going to be better. You probably won't be flying high in the 'copter, so not far from the ground/scenery.
I'd second the recommendation of wide angle to get the landscape from the air. Personally, I'd carry both the K-5 (w/ Sigma 70-300) and the K-1 (w/ 35-to-whichever) on the flight. With neck straps, the cameras can't get away from you and the one that is not in use can rest in your lap. (Just make sure that if the copter seats have a shoulder harness, that you lift the cameras up so the straps don't end up under the harness.)

Also, think about which side of the helicopter you want to sit on (based on the expected flight path, scenery, and sun): 1) shady-side is better than the sunny side because the sun will light up all the dirt and scratches on the window; 2) the mountainous side is likely to better than the flat side for scenery; 3) the helicopter will almost certainly land facing upwind in the hut area which may affect which side of the craft has the best view of the hut or the peak during the approach.

If you do sit on the shady side, look down and at an angle that is exactly opposite the sun. The shadow of the helicopter can be quite photo-worthy both around take-off and landing and in midlfight when you cna get some interesting lighting effects on the ground.

ENJOY THE FLIGHT!

P.S. If you have to shoot through a window, do not use a polarizer because the plastic in the polarizer interacts with the polarized light from the sky and lens polarizer to create strange color casts.
03-24-2019, 05:38 PM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sandy Hancock Quote
Hello again Mark.

In light of new information I'm going to change my advice; it seems you have other lenses you didn't mention initially, and you didn't make it clear how much you prefer the 35-70 over the 35-135.

Use the lenses you like best. It will give you more confidence, which for event portraiture especially can help you get better results. So the 35-70 it should be. Which tele-zoom you take should likewise be dictated by your personal preference. I suspect 210mm on crop is probably long enough if that is your favourite.

I agree that something wider than 18mm on crop would be useful. The 8mm fisheye is overkill, but that Cosina 24 should probably find a place in the bag just in case.

For shooting out of the helicopter, ensure you have a really secure carrying system. In Antarctica I was frequently leaning over open ocean and always a second leash to catch the camera in case option 1 somehow failed....
Thanks Sandy. I have a pretty good selection of manual lenses, but I would hate to lose a crucial shot because I'm focussing! My thinking in the helicopter is to leave the K-1 safely in the camera bag! If the K-5 comes to grief, it's not the end of the world.

03-24-2019, 05:40 PM - 1 Like   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
By account of experienced hikers who've done the climb, it's a 1.5hr to 2hr trek. So, I really want to keep the weight down. An experienced hiker / climber may do it in under an hour. The people I'm with, and myself - nah.
I've now established that the helicopter will be dropping me about 100-200m from the summit, and not at Powell Hut, so that should make it far easier getting more gear to the top. I think I might take the big tripod!
03-24-2019, 05:44 PM - 1 Like   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by photoptimist Quote
I'd second the recommendation of wide angle to get the landscape from the air. Personally, I'd carry both the K-5 (w/ Sigma 70-300) and the K-1 (w/ 35-to-whichever) on the flight. With neck straps, the cameras can't get away from you and the one that is not in use can rest in your lap. (Just make sure that if the copter seats have a shoulder harness, that you lift the cameras up so the straps don't end up under the harness.)

Also, think about which side of the helicopter you want to sit on (based on the expected flight path, scenery, and sun): 1) shady-side is better than the sunny side because the sun will light up all the dirt and scratches on the window; 2) the mountainous side is likely to better than the flat side for scenery; 3) the helicopter will almost certainly land facing upwind in the hut area which may affect which side of the craft has the best view of the hut or the peak during the approach.

If you do sit on the shady side, look down and at an angle that is exactly opposite the sun. The shadow of the helicopter can be quite photo-worthy both around take-off and landing and in midlfight when you cna get some interesting lighting effects on the ground.

ENJOY THE FLIGHT!

P.S. If you have to shoot through a window, do not use a polarizer because the plastic in the polarizer interacts with the polarized light from the sky and lens polarizer to create strange color casts.
I'll be limited in where to sit on the helicopter based upon where the pilot is sitting. I'll be in the (other) front seat. I don't think he'll fly with the door off, so i'll be limited in shooting through the windows. I'm not sure if these can be open in flight or not.

Thank you! I'm sure I will enjoy it. I've never flown in a helicopter.
03-24-2019, 06:09 PM - 1 Like   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
I've now established that the helicopter will be dropping me about 100-200m from the summit, and not at Powell Hut, so that should make it far easier getting more gear to the top. I think I might take the big tripod!
Define "dropping"?

03-24-2019, 06:30 PM - 1 Like   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
I'll be limited in where to sit on the helicopter based upon where the pilot is sitting. I'll be in the (other) front seat. I don't think he'll fly with the door off, so i'll be limited in shooting through the windows. I'm not sure if these can be open in flight or not.

Thank you! I'm sure I will enjoy it. I've never flown in a helicopter.
Usually single pilot helicopter operations are flown from the right seat, most of the instruments are located there. What is the helicopter model? I'm sure the pilot will remind you but be aware of the main rotor blades height above any sloped surface and be very aware of the tail rotor blades if the helicopter pilot doesn't stop the rotor system.

Last edited by Larrymc; 03-24-2019 at 06:44 PM.
03-24-2019, 06:43 PM - 2 Likes   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by Larrymc Quote
Usually single pilot helicopter operations are flown from the right seat, most of the instruments are located there. What is the helicopter model?
Don't they fly on the other side of the aircraft down under?
03-24-2019, 06:47 PM - 2 Likes   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
Don't they fly on the other side of the aircraft down under?
No - they fly upside down!
03-24-2019, 07:27 PM - 1 Like   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
Define "dropping"?

Ha yes. Hopefully not too far. While the K-1II can handle the bump, I'm sure, I think I may struggle!
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