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07-27-2020, 03:01 PM - 1 Like   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ash Quote
I had to keep ISO down to 800 before upgrading to the K-5, which I pushed to 1600 comfortably and even 3200 at a pinch.
I agree with this based on my K-5IIs.

In my film days I did half a dozen weddings for friends and family as the 'official' photographer. When people asked me to do them, I always made a point to tell them I was a hobbyist, not a professional, so don't expect professional results. I always went to the wedding rehearsal to scope out where I needed to stand and when so I wouldn't miss any important shots. I also always asked the minister how he felt about flash photography. Some said 'no flash' during the ceremony itself, but OK before and after. At a recent family wedding the minister told me 'no problem at all'.

I found it very useful to have my flash mounted on a bracket so it was above and to the left of the lens, so red-eye was never a problem.

07-27-2020, 03:14 PM - 1 Like   #17
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I used to do weddings in my youth for some extra money...I started with a Yashicamat 124G and a Pentax MX. On the MX I had a Vivitar series 1 28-85 ( or was it 90) and a 50/1.7. Later I replaced the Yashicamat with a Hasselblad 500C with the 80mm T* and a Kenko 2X. I also got 2 A24 back. For 35mm I upped to a Super Program. I used Vivitar 285 with my own lead acid batteries that got me up to 800 full power flashes. I always used a bracket for the flash. I only did one wedding for a friend with digital...Pentax K2000 with a Vivitar 285 on a bracket. I don't know why someone would think Pentax lacks for flash photography. I saw allot of wedding photographers using 645s back then. Maybe because I don't use all the advanced capabilities of modem flash... A few thinks I can say about wedding photography... Don't monopolize the couple time...they aren't there for you. Get your posed shots done quick...and the usual required shots...cutting the cake, toasts, garter and bouquet, etc. Take alot of candids, tables and the people there. When they look back on their wedding they will enjoy seeing picks of friends and family...not just themselves. If I we're going to shoot a wedding now with the dslr I have, I would take my K-70 with my Tamron 10-24, FA 50/1.4, 18-200 and 100/2.8 macro. I'd prefer a fast 17-50 but I don't have one. And my flash bracket. You can shoot with higher iso indoors, but why? The flash will freeze action better and lower iso will look better. I'd use an umbrella or diffuser on my flash. I have a bracket with a small umbrella. My 2 cents...
07-27-2020, 04:41 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by kman42 Quote
I did say arguably! Generally weddings put autofocus (especially AF-C) and flash setups to the test, which is where Pentax technology tends to lag the most. Of course the cameras are still usable, but its just not what the brand is geared towards.
if the downside is af-c I would say that birds in flight and sports would be more of a challenge than weddings
07-27-2020, 05:53 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Apet-Sure Quote
I agree with this based on my K-5IIs.

In my film days I did half a dozen weddings for friends and family as the 'official' photographer. When people asked me to do them, I always made a point to tell them I was a hobbyist, not a professional, so don't expect professional results. I always went to the wedding rehearsal to scope out where I needed to stand and when so I wouldn't miss any important shots. I also always asked the minister how he felt about flash photography. Some said 'no flash' during the ceremony itself, but OK before and after. At a recent family wedding the minister told me 'no problem at all'.

I found it very useful to have my flash mounted on a bracket so it was above and to the left of the lens, so red-eye was never a problem.
Yes, flash opens up vastly more possibilities of photographing people indoors, since good ambient lighting only exists in specific spots that cannot be guaranteed when you need to shoot.
Even better is a white ceiling that can be used to bounce flash off for more flattering lighting effects.
It's also been effective shooting with a trailing curtain if the subject is still enough, since the background comes to life in a longer exposure.

07-27-2020, 05:57 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sidney Porter Quote
if the downside is af-c I would say that birds in flight and sports would be more of a challenge than weddings
I agree actually. To be honest, I often forget about sports photography because I've never had anything to do with it lol
07-28-2020, 02:51 AM - 1 Like   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by tonyzoc Quote
I don't know why someone would think Pentax lacks for flash photography. I saw allot of wedding photographers using 645s back then.
It surprises me if people are having trouble focusing for a wedding. Perhaps they mean for the dancing afterwards rather than the wedding itself. My father did weddings as a "Saturday professional" in the 1960s. His studio provided him with an old-fashioned 620 film camera, with bellows focusing on a scale; he must have judged the distance. For my own wedding the photog used a Rollei TLR.

But in those days (not now?) there was a set photo routine outside the church of Bride & Groom, Bride & Groom & Parents, Bride & Groom & Bridesmaids, Bride & Groom & Parents & Bridesmaids, etc etc with a final big picture of everybody there. All were posed with "Keep still, say cheese and watch the birdie!". Perhaps people were more inclined to do what they were asked back then. I have been writing my family history lately, illustrated with old photos, and those formal shots are very useful - who was there and who was not. I'd have no use for pictures of people dancing afterwards.

At one wedding the camera shutter failed. He continued, stopping down to minumum aperture, setting the shutter to to Bulb (that still worked) and exposed by removing the lens cap momentarily. No-one seemed to notice the problem and the studio was able to salvage the shots in the darkroom.

Here is one (not with the failed shutter) from around 1960 when he was working idependently. If he used flash it would have been a bulb.


07-28-2020, 01:05 PM   #22
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My Vivitar 283 has an attachment that allows you to use the white side of a standard Kodak gray card for bounce flash. Old school, but works great.
07-28-2020, 01:29 PM - 2 Likes   #23
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I've done a few weddings in the past for friends or helping friends. I've always found them quite stressful, big day, no repeats etc.. One friend asked me to take a few snaps, so I took along my trusty OM2 with 50mm lens, intending to do a few background informal shots only to discover I was doing the lot! I then discovered that the camera was giving me the same meter reading no matter where I pointed it. I guessed all my exposures all day and thanked the latitude of film. They were very pleased with the results luckily and I just handed over the developed films for them to turn into an album but I think that might have been the last time I took a camera to a wedding, from then on I concentrated on drinking the couples health and sparing my own nerves.

07-29-2020, 05:49 AM   #24
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A family member did a wedding as a favor for a friend. She rented a flash with stand and a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens for the day. Good preparation there, but she went to day with one camera body and one battery. The battery died but luckily there was time to top it up during the sermon. The lens was much heavier than anything she was used to in her own kit and saw little use. The stand tipped over at some stage and the flash was damaged. There was some sort of co-payment on the insurance claim that she was liable for. Apparently the pictures turned out OK...
07-29-2020, 10:06 AM - 1 Like   #25
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Ouch! ^^^ Stress - the reason I quit doing weddings as the 'official' photographer.
07-29-2020, 07:46 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by kman42 Quote
Thanks for the input. I have actually been thinking about trading my 35mm for a different focal length (I've always found it a bit awkward - always either too wide or not wide enough). Have been tossing up between a 50mm and the Pentax 21mm. I need to check Exposure Plot for my most common focal lengths.

I've always struggled with manual focus can't ever seem to dial the focus in quick enough. Maybe I just need to practice more
"I have actually been thinking about trading my 35mm for a different focal length (I've always found it a bit awkward"

The 35mm on a cropped camera will be the equivalent of a 50mm lens which is perfect for group shots. Anything longer and you are constantly backing up...
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