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11-27-2008, 09:18 PM   #16
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Hi ESCharlie,

The others have said it all -- I also use my past firearms training to good effect. All the tips usually associated with shooting guns transfer very directly -- stance, breathing, hold, and a smooth release.

With long lenses, 300-700mm for me, I try to keep the shutter speed faster than @ 1/100, and have found that by relaxing a bit and letting the camera drift a bit, I get better performance from the SR in my K10 and K20. One very important tip is to lock exposure and focus correctly on small subjects within the moving viewfinder -- it takes some patience and timing. I'll also lean against anything I can, or as Laree suggested, kneel or sit with at least one elbow resting on a knee. The kneeling and sitting firearms positions also translate directly to shooting cameras.

I have relied on hand holding my FA*300/4.5 (with or without a TC) for the largest percentage of shots in the past, but since I now use a 300/2.8 (wiith or without TCs) just about all the time, I forced myself to use tripods a lot more this past season with very good results -- so in addition to the big glass, I've been lugging a pretty sizeable CF tripod with me when I can. I do shoot the big fast 300s hand held on occasion though. . . a lot harder to do, but still possible if you aren't shooting a lengthy series.

Scott

11-27-2008, 09:21 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by bdery Quote
Just some things I always do:

1-always hold the camera from below (especially important when shooting portrait-oriented)

2-exhale, hold breath mid-way

3-rest your elbows on the sides of your body, squeezing your torso so to speak

4-one foot slightly in front of the other, boxing-style

5-straight back ad legs

6helf-press, take your time, fully press the shutter

That's it! I've taken some very good 1/5 seconds shots that way.

This is pretty much my technique also. I've become pretty good at getting very,
very still for shots, which contributes to sharpness more than lens sample variation, IMO.


.
11-27-2008, 09:43 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Eastern Shore Charlie Quote
I thought I would make a brand new thread with this quote from Creampuff from another thread. He is exactly right. It is a skill to hold the camera still. A skill I would love to have and know. What technique do you use? What works best for you. Please share.....
Experience....and in-camera stabilization:

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11-27-2008, 10:13 PM   #19
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QuoteQuote:
6helf-press, take your time, fully press the shutter

That's it! I've taken some very good 1/5 seconds shots that way.
I have the correct technique (elbows in, breathing, etc) but I think I don't wait long enough for the SR to kick in. With glasses on, it is difficult to get close enough to the viewfinder to see the bottom information, so I don't have that little reminder....

11-27-2008, 10:22 PM   #20
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This is from my Canon AE-1P manual, from back in 1982-83:

The slightest movement of your body during shutter release may cause blur in the picture. The best way to prevent camera movement is to hold the camera as steady as possible, with your left hand supporting the camera and lens. Press your left elbow to your body and lightly press the camera against your cheek or forehead. For a vertical shot steady at least one elbow against your body. Spread your feet slightly apart, one foot ahead of the other, and relax. Lean against a steady support if one is available. Note: There is no distinctive way to define the most suitable way for you. Select a method that provides comfort in addition to stability. It may help to practice in front of a mirror.

This is the way it's been done for years, and it works. I just wish I would remember this all the time, specially when chasing that critical shot. Worst of all for me is usually the stab-the-shutter no-no.

11-27-2008, 10:55 PM   #21
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Ditto.

Elbows tucked in nice and firm against the rib cage and firing after breathing out; do it enough and you won't even have to think about it when the camera is in your hands.

QuoteOriginally posted by the_int21h Quote
I often find that taking a deep breath and then exhale - that moment of silence and no need of movement is the time to snap a photo.
11-28-2008, 12:50 AM   #22
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A good solid stance is required. As wide and as low as possible. Solid triangulation is important, pending on the size of lens. Making oneself into a tripod as best as possible. I also like to use what ever I can to steady myself, buildings, vegetation or other people. Keeping elbows in tight to the body if possible.

For panning shots, I stand facing the final finish position and then rotate my torso to the start position. I test and adjust in order to get the scene all in shot. Then when twisted up, I then unwind and thus flow more naturally through all the shots.
11-28-2008, 05:58 AM   #23
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Three that haven't been mentioned.

1. Don't mind looking silly. I sometimes wrap myself around a pole so that if the pole doesn't move the camera isn't likely to move.

2. Practice. With digital, it doesn't cost anything. Christmas lights, with strings of small individual bulbs, are great for practicing.

3. When shooting in low light there is no technique that will guarantee 100% of the shots will be stready. So, shoot a series. If you shoot five and only one is sharp, how many do you need?

11-28-2008, 12:52 PM   #24
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Sounds daft, but practice, you will get better over time to the point of almost second nature. You will develop a style or technique that suits you.

There is some very good advice mentioned above, take it and adapt to suit you.
11-28-2008, 01:43 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by LaRee Quote
Most times I actually shoot from a squat. I know it is strange but I like viewing from a low angle and so I have to discipline myself to stand upright. I definitely squeeze my elbows into my sides when I am shooting with the bigma hand held. Maybe not the most relaxed position but it helps keep me steady with that long heavy lens.
Sometimes, squatting or kneeling yields the best prospective and at times, the only one.

QuoteOriginally posted by patrickt Quote
Three that haven't been mentioned.

1. Don't mind looking silly. I sometimes wrap myself around a pole so that if the pole doesn't move the camera isn't likely to move.

2. Practice. With digital, it doesn't cost anything. Christmas lights, with strings of small individual bulbs, are great for practicing.

3. When shooting in low light there is no technique that will guarantee 100% of the shots will be stready. So, shoot a series. If you shoot five and only one is sharp, how many do you need?
I don't hug the posts and trees, but I do lean on them!
11-28-2008, 02:15 PM   #26
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2 pages and no one has mentioned duct tape yet. LOL. However, a chain tripod is good in a pinch when a tripod or monopod won't do well.
11-28-2008, 03:41 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by mithrandir Quote
2 pages and no one has mentioned duct tape yet. LOL. However, a chain tripod is good in a pinch when a tripod or monopod won't do well.
Dude, don't you know ANYTHING about photography!? We use GAFFER tape!
11-28-2008, 03:51 PM   #28
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At my age, I rely on a fast shutter speed.

Jer
11-28-2008, 04:05 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by Venturi Quote
Dude, don't you know ANYTHING about photography!? We use GAFFER tape!
I prefer duck tape.
11-28-2008, 04:59 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
I prefer duck tape.
too many feathers
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