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11-20-2021, 10:44 AM - 1 Like   #16
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I would keep your long term plans in mind. When I started out, I got a cheap used DSLR and two lenses for $100. It was great condition for what it was, but it was very basic and I quickly outgrew it to the point that I lost interest in shooting. I like to shoot long exposure light painting, and it didn't offer the features and noise control I needed. I upgraded to the K3 II and couldn't be happier now.

My point is with Pentax, don't buy based on what fits your needs right now. If you can afford it, consider buying what fits your long term plans that you can grow in to. You'll have plenty of time to learn the controls, and Pentax has that lovely green button that is like an instant auto mode in case you get settings far out of whack and need to get a shot before it's too late.

11-20-2021, 12:16 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by stephen_G Quote
Hi All,

I'm looking to purchase a DSLR.
I guess you'd call me a beginner in that respect, although I have used a Pentax ME Super film camera previously, (and I do intend to keep using that for some film photography).
But a DSLR seems to offer so much, in terms of access to images, that it would be a great asset.
Additionally, I have some nice Pentax SMC lenses from my old film photography kit that I believe I can use with the DLSR,
which would be handy.
I believe that the K70 would be a good choice, based on what I have read so far, would that be a good choice for a beginner to digital photography?
Also what would be a good lens choice for that camera?

Thanks for any advice.

Stephen
There was a playfull insight of how long untill someone will suggest K-3III. And knowing it is expensive...it does have OVF quite a bit like your ME Super(I have actually the very same camera(broken one unfortunatelly)). all works, but there is lealings that needs to be replaced, since there is light leak that is happening on the film. I still have the camera and I was looking through K-1 and K-3III and ME Super. ofcourse ME super is a clear winner in therms of OVF size but to me it did appear to my surprise that K-3III was actually brighter and almost felt like bigger than K-1.

One thing that brohgt me to K-1 was OVF size. and the fact that I could get that FF.

Now my main camera is K-3III because of that OVF.

That all said. I do actually think that K-70 is pretty good choise, even if I have not had that. When it does come to lenses and you have had fun with your old lenses, which could take a while actually and you want to get some APS-C lenses to get you a bit more modern touch. I'v seen plenty of examples of nice plastic fantastic photos, and I do thik that they are good. Limited lenses are great.

HD lenses are very nice. I do mean most recent ones. There has been suggestion of 18-135. I do not have that. I have DA*16-50 SDM and I do have DFA 28-105. While latter is not as good in terms of it's wide reach, I do think that it is very nice on APS-C and FF. That is IF you are thinking of having K-1 in some point.


After those things and your legacy lenses from film, I'd put my money in best primes you can afford in Pentax land. Some can be had second hand from this forum. This all depends on your budget. But even one very nice prime can be a lot of fun. My bet is on limiteds and DA* or DFA* lenses. This all depends on your preferences. I have FA limiteds, DA*55(nice lens too) DFA * 70-200(nice on FF and aps-c) and DA and DFA lenses and some older stuff I do not use anymore because of these new DFA lenses I have bought. And I have gone through many lenses, all really nice and with unique rendering too. One thing I do regret is selling of is A 35-105/4, but DFA 28-105 is filling that spot. But as we know. Modern lenses have very good things build in. Old lenses have that unique rendering, you can't just PP in.

So, explore.

have fun, and it will be all good!
11-20-2021, 01:56 PM   #18
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Your choice of DSLR is interesting, and a little bit brave. The other brands are slowly weaning off DSLR in favour of mirrorless (not so slowly for some). Only Pentax has committed to the DSLR format into the future.

I had thought that only a few established DSLR shooters would stay with it. There are both advantages and disadvantages to each of the two alternatives. Many Pentaxians are sticking because they enjoy the "real" optical viewfinder, but also because they are heavily invested in Pentax glass (which is excellent by and large). I had not anticipated that new photographers would opt for DSLR in its "declining days".
11-20-2021, 02:36 PM   #19
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All good suggestions, but there is also an argument to say, if you have the budget, you might find a second hand K-1 and then use your old film lenses with the same field of view as film but with the benefits of digital. I use mostly older lenses on my K-1 and really enjoy them.

11-20-2021, 03:16 PM - 4 Likes   #20
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Welcome to PF Stephen.
QuoteOriginally posted by stephen_G Quote
With regard to my budget, I'm keen to stay within my means as much as possible, (however tempting the lure ofall the new equipment that is available!). ...In terms of buying used/experienced equipment, I have considered that option, but I'm thinking that as a newcomer I would prefer to buy the camera body new with the protection of a warranty.
Wise move with an entry level model like the K-70. It's a solid camera, but it doesn't have the more robust construction of the flagship models (e.g. K-3 series) and the KP, which are a safer secondhand purchase.

The references that have been made to aperture block issues in the K-70 refer to the fact that a cheap solenoid in the aperture control mechanism is known to be vulnerable to failure; the more expensive models use a different mechanism which doesn't have this problem. The problem seems to be far less common on the K-70 than on earlier models and it seems less likely to arise if the camera is used regularly, but it's a good reason to buy under warranty.

You could get a used K-3 (or maybe a K-3ii) for less than a new K-70. It's also a 24mp APS-C camera and, apart from being more robust, has some nice features not found on the K-70: e.g. quiet shutter, faster frame rate, better dust removal system, bigger battery, capacity to add a grip, better exposure metering, more customisation, 2 SD card slots, top LCD and so on. But the K-70 offers a flippy screen (the K-3 series doesn't) which is really useful for high or low shots (think ground level macro, for example) and when used on a tripod. The K-70 probably has better video too. And here's the kicker: the K-70 has better image quality and a better dynamic range at higher ISOs. To match it or better it, in a Pentax APS-C model, you would need to get a KP (now out of production) or a K-3iii (nearly three times the price). Aperture block issue aside, the K-70 offers outstanding bang for buck.
QuoteOriginally posted by stephen_G Quote
Maybe a good compromise would be to buy a used/experienced lens to go with it and save some money there.My interests would be in landscape, nature, architecture, wildlife, macro, the usual stuff really.I'm looking for something that will give me great quality images with impact, (I guess as we all are).I'm fairly relaxed about the sensor size issue, I think that it is just a case of getting used to the different standard.
I can understand your reasoning, but if you buy the K-70 bundled with the DA 18-135mm f3.5-5.6, you will get the lens for a bargain price compared to buying body only. It's sometimes disparaged because it is commonly sold in a bundle like this, but to call it a kit lens does it a disservice. It really is a surprisingly good lens - and I say that having used many other more expensive lenses. You can get the impactful images you are seeking. See the reviews here (including mine!): SMC Pentax-DA 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 ED AL [IF] DC WR Reviews - DA Zoom Lenses - Pentax Lens Reviews & Lens Database This is a great lens for starting out with a DSLR because of its versatility and capability. You can add other more specialist lenses (e.g. an ultrawide or macro or a Limited or star lens) around it as funds permit.

Since wildlife is on the agenda, do seriously consider a DA 55-300mm f4.5-6.3 PLM as well. Fantastic lens at a great price (look for it on sale, e.g. Black Friday deals). There are cheaper AF alternatives if your budget is really tight (e.g. the previous DA 55-300 f4-5.8 models), but they don't have the fast and quiet AF, or the superior rendering, of the PLM model.

One comment about coming to DSLR from film. When I made that transition, I thought processing was over. Hooray - instant images! But what I have come to learn is that to get the best results with digital images, you need to shoot in RAW and process them yourself, not just use jpgs straight out of camera (SOOC). The gains you can make through even routinised light processing, which takes very little time, are considerable. And the capacity is there to really lift the better images. My biggest photographic regret is that for the first 6 years of having a DSLR I shot jpg only. Now I rarely show those images. l can't look at those photos without thinking how much better they could be if I had the RAW files. If learning post-processing (PP) seems a bit much while you are learning to use the new camera, that's natural. OK, so shoot in jpg and try out the in-camera settings (e.g. distortion correction, lens aberration correction, shadow correction, etc). But, for heaven's sake, shoot in RAW as well and store the images for the day when you get into PP. (All recent cameras let you choose between jpg only, RAW only or jpg+RAW.) Your future self will thank you for it. The beauty is that as you and your software get better at PP, you can revisit old images and improve them.

An example of PP software improvement is noise reduction. It has come a long way in recent years. Here's an example of an image taken handheld in poor light with the K-3 + FA*300mm f4.5 at f5, 1/50th (imagine that with a film camera at the equivalent of 450mm!), 6400 ISO (where the K-3 is pretty ordinary). I shot RAW + jpg. Here is the SOOC jpg


After recently re-processing the RAW file with DxO PhotoLab and its new DeepPrime function (with greatly improved noise reduction):




If this can't convince you of the value of shooting RAW, I'll just shut up and go away. ;-)

Last edited by Des; 03-18-2022 at 03:17 PM.
11-20-2021, 08:54 PM - 1 Like   #21
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My advice on buying a camera is to buy the newest technology you can afford. You are not going to go wrong on any of the Pentax cameras you can get, only the K-3III, K-1II, and KP are newer models; and they have ended production on the KP. The K-70 is the lowest priced new Pentax camera you can get, it's a good choice. You've read that it can have aperture block failure, so buy it new with warranty. There are a lot of lens options, we all have our favorites, depending on what we shoot. I shoot mostly nature and wildlife, and landscapes. My most used lens are the DA20-40Ltd, DA*300, DA33-300PLM, and DA 15 Ltd. I also use the DA1.4 rear converter with the 300 and 55-300. There are several 55-300 lenses that Pentax has made, the PLM is the newest and best by a lot. Also notice that many of the digital lens have a WR or AW designation meaning they are weather resistant, which is the type of lens that needs to be paired with a WR camera to actually have weather resistance. And as Des says above, watch for bundled deals, you can sometimes get a lens for next to nothing.
11-21-2021, 04:08 AM - 1 Like   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by aslyfox Quote
one more thing to consider

getting the ebook for which ever new DSLR body you choose



PentaxForums.com PayPal Donations
Thanks for the suggestion on the e-book.

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:12 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by repaap Quote
There was a playfull insight of how long untill someone will suggest K-3III. And knowing it is expensive...it does have OVF quite a bit like your ME Super(I have actually the very same camera(broken one unfortunatelly)). all works, but there is lealings that needs to be replaced, since there is light leak that is happening on the film. I still have the camera and I was looking through K-1 and K-3III and ME Super. ofcourse ME super is a clear winner in therms of OVF size but to me it did appear to my surprise that K-3III was actually brighter and almost felt like bigger than K-1.

One thing that brohgt me to K-1 was OVF size. and the fact that I could get that FF.

Now my main camera is K-3III because of that OVF.

That all said. I do actually think that K-70 is pretty good choise, even if I have not had that. When it does come to lenses and you have had fun with your old lenses, which could take a while actually and you want to get some APS-C lenses to get you a bit more modern touch. I'v seen plenty of examples of nice plastic fantastic photos, and I do thik that they are good. Limited lenses are great.

HD lenses are very nice. I do mean most recent ones. There has been suggestion of 18-135. I do not have that. I have DA*16-50 SDM and I do have DFA 28-105. While latter is not as good in terms of it's wide reach, I do think that it is very nice on APS-C and FF. That is IF you are thinking of having K-1 in some point.


After those things and your legacy lenses from film, I'd put my money in best primes you can afford in Pentax land. Some can be had second hand from this forum. This all depends on your budget. But even one very nice prime can be a lot of fun. My bet is on limiteds and DA* or DFA* lenses. This all depends on your preferences. I have FA limiteds, DA*55(nice lens too) DFA * 70-200(nice on FF and aps-c) and DA and DFA lenses and some older stuff I do not use anymore because of these new DFA lenses I have bought. And I have gone through many lenses, all really nice and with unique rendering too. One thing I do regret is selling of is A 35-105/4, but DFA 28-105 is filling that spot. But as we know. Modern lenses have very good things build in. Old lenses have that unique rendering, you can't just PP in.

So, explore.

have fun, and it will be all good!
Thanks for the great detailed advice, much appreciated.

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:25 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Paul the Sunman Quote
Your choice of DSLR is interesting, and a little bit brave. The other brands are slowly weaning off DSLR in favour of mirrorless (not so slowly for some). Only Pentax has committed to the DSLR format into the future.

I had thought that only a few established DSLR shooters would stay with it. There are both advantages and disadvantages to each of the two alternatives. Many Pentaxians are sticking because they enjoy the "real" optical viewfinder, but also because they are heavily invested in Pentax glass (which is excellent by and large). I had not anticipated that new photographers would opt for DSLR in its "declining days".
Thanks for that insight, I wasn't aware that DSLR might be in decline, with some manufacturers moving away from the format. Do you feel that the production cost of a mirrorless camera compared to a DSLR is an influencing factor in their decision to move to mirrorless?
I do have some awareness of mirrorless as I have a friend who uses them, (not Pentax, another manufacturer), and he gets great results. It was potentially an option for me, but having already invested in Pentax lenses, it seems to make more sense financially to stick with the Pentax brand, and go for a modern Pentax camera. I do feel a brand loyalty to Pentax.

11-21-2021, 04:31 AM - 1 Like   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by stephen_G Quote
Hi All,

I'm looking to purchase a DSLR.
I guess you'd call me a beginner in that respect, although I have used a Pentax ME Super film camera previously, (and I do intend to keep using that for some film photography).
But a DSLR seems to offer so much, in terms of access to images, that it would be a great asset.
Additionally, I have some nice Pentax SMC lenses from my old film photography kit that I believe I can use with the DLSR,
which would be handy.
I believe that the K70 would be a good choice, based on what I have read so far, would that be a good choice for a beginner to digital photography?
Also what would be a good lens choice for that camera?

Thanks for any advice.

Stephen
I see that you are in the UK. Park cameras have a KP and 18-50 or 55 - I can't quite remember - for £749 at the moment. I'd really recommend the KP as it's a fantastic camera and that is a really good price. Not much more than a K-70 and a much better camera.
11-21-2021, 04:42 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jeff Quote
I see that you are in the UK. Park cameras have a KP and 18-50 or 55 - I can't quite remember - for £749 at the moment. I'd really recommend the KP as it's a fantastic camera and that is a really good price. Not much more than a K-70 and a much better camera.
The strange thing is they are selling the body only for £999. Of course the body is in stock but the kit with lens is awaiting stock. It is a good price, Amazon had a recent warehouse deal for the body only for around the same price.

11-21-2021, 04:42 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
Welcome to PF Stephen.

Wise move with an entry level model like the K-70. It's a solid camera, but it doesn't have the more robust construction of the flagship models (e.g. K-3 series) and the KP, which are a safer secondhand purchase.

The references that have been made to aperture block issues in the K-70 refer to the fact that a cheap solenoid in the aperture control mechanism is known to be vulnerable to failure; the more expensive models use a different mechanism which doesn't have this problem. The problem seems to be far less common on the K-70 than on earlier models and it seems less likely to arise if the camera is used regularly, but it's a good reason to buy under warranty.

You could get a used K-3 (or maybe a K-3ii) for less than a new K-70. It's also a 24mp APS-C camera and, apart from being more robust, has some nice features not found on the K-70: e.g. quiet shutter, faster frame rate, better dust removal system, bigger battery, capacity to add a grip, better exposure metering, more customisation, 2 SD card slots, top LCD and so on. But the K-70 offers a flippy screen (the K-3 series doesn't) which is really useful for high or low shots (think ground level macro, for example) and when used on a tripod. The K-70 probably has better video too. And here's the kicker: the K-70 has better image quality and a better dynamic range at higher ISOs. To match it or better it, in a Pentax APS-C model, you would need to get a KP (now out of production) or a K-3iii (nearly three times the price). Aperture block issue aside, the K-70 offers outstanding bang for buck.

I can understand your reasoning, but if you buy the K-70 bundled with the DA 18-135mm f3.5-5.6, you will get the lens for a bargain price compared to buying body only. It's sometimes disparaged because it is commonly sold in a bundle like this, but to call it a kit lens does it a disservice. It really is a surprisingly good lens - and I say that having used many other more expensive lenses. You can get the impactful images you are seeking. See the reviews here (including mine!): SMC Pentax-DA 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 ED AL [IF] DC WR Reviews - DA Zoom Lenses - Pentax Lens Reviews & Lens Database This is a great lens for starting out with a DSLR because of its versatility and capability. You can add other more specialist lenses (e.g. an ultrawide or macro or a Limited or star lens) around it as funds permit.

Since wildlife is on the agenda, do seriously consider a DA 55-300mm f4.5-6.3 PLM as well. Fantastic lens at a great price (look for it on sale, e.g. Black Friday deals). There are cheaper AF alternatives if your budget is really tight (e.g. the previous DA 55-300 f4-5.8 models), but they don't have the fast and quiet AF, or the superior rendering, of the PLM model.

One comment about coming to DSLR from film. When I made that transition, I thought processing was over. Hooray - instant images! But what I have come to learn is that to get the best results with digital images, you need to shoot in RAW and process them yourself, not just use jpgs straight out of camera (SOOC). The gains you can make through even routinised light processing, which takes very little time, are considerable. And the capacity is there to really lift the better images. My biggest photographic regret is that for the first 6 years of having a DSLR I shot jpg only. Now I rarely show those images. l can't look at those photos without thinking how much better they could be if I had the RAW files. If learning post-processing (PP) seems a bit much while you are learning to use the new camera, that's natural. OK, so shoot in jpg and try out the in-camera settings (e.g. distortion correction, lens aberration correction, shadow correction, etc). But, for heaven's sake, shoot in RAW as well and store the images for the day when you get into PP. (All recent cameras let you choose between jpg only, RAW only or jpg+RAW.) Your future self will thank you for it. The beauty is that as you and your software get better at PP, you can revisit old images and improve them.

An example of PP software improvement is noise reduction. It has come a long way in recent years. Here's an example of an image taken handheld in poor light with the K-3 + FA*300mm f4.5 at f5, 1/50th (imagine that with a film camera at the equivalent of 450mm!), 6400 ISO (where the K-3 is pretty ordinary). I shot RAW + jpg. Here is the SOOC jpg


After recently re-processing the RAW file with DxO PhotoLab and its new DeepPrime function (with greatly improved noise reduction):


If this can't convince you of the value of shooting RAW, I'll just shut up and go away. ;-)
Hi Des, thanks for the detailed and considered advice, really helpful. And thanks also for posting the examples of processing, a great image and great results. Your advice on shooting RAW has saved me from making a fundamental mistake, many thanks. I'll check out DXO Photolab, what version are you using?

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:46 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by ramseybuckeye Quote
My advice on buying a camera is to buy the newest technology you can afford. You are not going to go wrong on any of the Pentax cameras you can get, only the K-3III, K-1II, and KP are newer models; and they have ended production on the KP. The K-70 is the lowest priced new Pentax camera you can get, it's a good choice. You've read that it can have aperture block failure, so buy it new with warranty. There are a lot of lens options, we all have our favorites, depending on what we shoot. I shoot mostly nature and wildlife, and landscapes. My most used lens are the DA20-40Ltd, DA*300, DA33-300PLM, and DA 15 Ltd. I also use the DA1.4 rear converter with the 300 and 55-300. There are several 55-300 lenses that Pentax has made, the PLM is the newest and best by a lot. Also notice that many of the digital lens have a WR or AW designation meaning they are weather resistant, which is the type of lens that needs to be paired with a WR camera to actually have weather resistance. And as Des says above, watch for bundled deals, you can sometimes get a lens for next to nothing.
Thanks Tom, great advice.

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:54 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by slartibartfast01 Quote
The strange thing is they are selling the body only for £999. Of course the body is in stock but the kit with lens is awaiting stock. It is a good price, Amazon had a recent warehouse deal for the body only for around the same price.
Yes I noticed that too, don't really understand why the kit is so much lower in price than the body only?
11-21-2021, 05:06 AM - 2 Likes   #26
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A lot of good advice in this thread. Just adding one thing: about lenses.

There is a rule of thumb that actually works:
Any older Pentax k-mount lens will work on any newer Pentax body, with the functionality it had as new. K and M lenses will need a setting in the menu in a digital camera, but it will work just fine as a manual focus, manual aperture setting lens.
A newer lens, on the other hand, will not always work on an older body. Obviously an auto-focus lens will not have auto focus on an old body, but newer lenses might also lack the aperture ring. and thus they can only be shot wide open on older (pre-A) bodies. And the newest lenses cannot even be used on pretty new digital bodies like the K-5.
So if you go the second hand route (which I would recommend for trying out the system at a low cost) be sure to buy newer lenses that are actually compatible with the body you bought. The one way to come around this possible problem would be to buy a new, unused body still in production. But that alternative comes with a cost.
You already have a set of lenses that you can use with any digital body, and there are zillions of second hand very good Pentax lenses on the second hand market. (Most of my own lenses were bought second hand) So don't be too bothered by this potential problem.

Kjell
11-21-2021, 05:14 AM - 1 Like   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by stephen_G Quote
Hi Des, thanks for the detailed and considered advice, really helpful. And thanks also for posting the examples of processing, a great image and great results. Your advice on shooting RAW has saved me from making a fundamental mistake, many thanks. I'll check out DXO Photolab, what version are you using?

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:46 AM ----------


Thanks Tom, great advice.

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:54 AM ----------


Yes I noticed that too, don't really understand why the kit is so much lower in price than the body only?
Re. RAW, if you are just recording events, well jpegs are fine though for that I find my cellphone (Huawei Pro) is pretty darn good and I don't bother with my KP or K-70.* BUT, for any shot where you want to photograph to actually communicate something to self and/or others, RAW is far, far, far more versatile (as Des shows).

_________
*I have both. And, I love both though I do use KP more to be honest--especially outdoors (in winter be aware I find that a battery grip pretty much required on a KP if much below 0C). The K-70 is a bit more forgiving at colder temps. That said, if you like forest floor macros of shrooms and suchlike things, the tiltscreen on the K-70 is much more handy though KP's works, just not quite as many angles available.

Last edited by jgnfld; 11-21-2021 at 06:35 AM.
11-21-2021, 06:42 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by jgnfld Quote
Re. RAW, if you are just recording events, well jpegs are fine though for that use my cellphone (Huawei Pro) is pretty darn good and I don't bother with my KP or K-70.* BUT, for any shot where you want to photograph to actually communicate something to self and/or others, RAW is far, far, far more versatile (as Des shows).

_________
*I have both. And, I love both though I do use KP more to be honest--especially outdoors and in winter (be aware I find that a battery grip pretty much required on a KP if much below 0C). The K-70 is a bit more forgiving at colder temps. That said, if you like forest floor macros of shrooms and suchlike things, the tiltscreen on the K-70 is much more handy though KP's works, just not quite as many angles available.
It all depends on your use case.

In college, I used mostly a Kodak ďInstamaticĒ {the iPhone of the time}, but bought a rangefinder camera with some of my graduation money so I could catch motion. Today, a smart phone is a lousy choice if the event includes motivation. Later I purchased a SLR so I could choose focal length; yes, the modern smart phones allow you a {limited} choice of focal lengths, but they are nothing like a DSLR with its choice of prime and zoom lenses.

Likewise, you can manipulate a RAW file as much as you want to Ö.. or {with a K-70, KP, K-3iii, or a K-1ii} you can choose a suitable ISO value and let the Ďacceleratorí do the work.

Last edited by reh321; 11-21-2021 at 07:08 AM.
11-21-2021, 10:07 AM - 1 Like   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by stephen_G Quote
Thanks for the suggestion on the e-book.

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:12 AM ----------


Thanks for the great detailed advice, much appreciated.

---------- Post added 11-21-21 at 04:25 AM ----------


Thanks for that insight, I wasn't aware that DSLR might be in decline, with some manufacturers moving away from the format. Do you feel that the production cost of a mirrorless camera compared to a DSLR is an influencing factor in their decision to move to mirrorless?
I do have some awareness of mirrorless as I have a friend who uses them, (not Pentax, another manufacturer), and he gets great results. It was potentially an option for me, but having already invested in Pentax lenses, it seems to make more sense financially to stick with the Pentax brand, and go for a modern Pentax camera. I do feel a brand loyalty to Pentax.
No problem at all

Just to comment about that DSLR/MILC conversation .. Iím shooting with MILC which is more in video and I do just love DSLR. OVF is like fresh air after you have used MILC for longer time for photography. Especially K-3III or K-1 with bigger OVF.

Seems that Pentax has been dedicating them self for the pure pleasure of photography. It has taken me a while, but it seems that Panasonic is not that much different from Olympus I had before it. Iím sure that you are aware of this as your friend has MILC, but it does not feel like photography. You try to get exposure and all things right, it does get some time to get things going and then you have lag. That moment you did see, did pass(happened to me actually today. To me that future is not here, atleast not now.

With Pentax it is easy. You can even look throught OVF when camera is not on(so many times black screen on MILC for me). If your settings are wrong due you just came from in to out or you forgot to change them from last night. No worries! Green button is your friend and you can easy adjust from there. Quick look of preview and quick adjustment and shoot away! Iím not going to bore you with more of my findings, but Iím raising my hand as happy Pentax camper

Alright! Carry on!

11-21-2021, 10:23 AM   #30
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Join Date: Nov 2021
Posts: 56
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by repaap Quote
No problem at all

Just to comment about that DSLR/MILC conversation .. Iím shooting with MILC which is more in video and I do just love DSLR. OVF is like fresh air after you have used MILC for longer time for photography. Especially K-3III or K-1 with bigger OVF.

Seems that Pentax has been dedicating them self for the pure pleasure of photography. It has taken me a while, but it seems that Panasonic is not that much different from Olympus I had before it. Iím sure that you are aware of this as your friend has MILC, but it does not feel like photography. You try to get exposure and all things right, it does get some time to get things going and then you have lag. That moment you did see, did pass(happened to me actually today. To me that future is not here, atleast not now.

With Pentax it is easy. You can even look throught OVF when camera is not on(so many times black screen on MILC for me). If your settings are wrong due you just came from in to out or you forgot to change them from last night. No worries! Green button is your friend and you can easy adjust from there. Quick look of preview and quick adjustment and shoot away! Iím not going to bore you with more of my findings, but Iím raising my hand as happy Pentax camper

Alright! Carry on!

Great stuff! Many thanks again for your insight.
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