Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
10-03-2023, 12:57 PM - 1 Like   #1
New Member




Join Date: Oct 2023
Posts: 7
Upgrade from K-S1

Hello eveyone!

I have been a Pentax user for the last 8 years, I have brought my Pentax K-S1 with me everywhere. I have always used it with the kit zoom and I must admit I have been happy with it. I took many photos during important events and trips, I preciously keep all my photos.

During last few years I have been digging into photo techniques, trying the various manual modes and recently I have bought some lenses, the DA 50mm F1.8, DA 55-300mm PLM and the Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 (all of them on another level from the kit zoom!).

I'm quite pleased and I always enjoy bringing them during a trip or on a walk. While experimenting I have noticed one thing: with one dial only, it's tricky to use the manual modes (M, Tv/AV) in some conditions, mainly with moving objects. So I was wondering if it is time to upgrade body of the camera.

Has anyone experienced the upgrade from the basic K-S1 to more advanced cameras like K70/KF or KP (used)? Is it worth it? Regarding image quality, I would gain 20% more Mpx and PixelShift, is it very noticeable? By looking at some samples yes (I'm a "pixel peeper" ). Another variable came in the last months, while I usually shoot landscapes and portraits, now I have a dog, Flora. I must admit it's very tricky to take photos, she moves all the time and action photos are really an it or miss (luckily the 55-300mm PLM is better than my other lenses in this regard). As for Pentax DSLR, standing to reviews and comments, I should look at the K3 III but right now out of budget. Any ideas? Thanks!

Attached Images
   
10-03-2023, 02:01 PM - 1 Like   #2
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Jersey C.I.
Posts: 3,586
From personal experience, though not from a K-S1, the K-70 would just about fulfil all your requirements and it would seem there are still a few cheaper examples around, so by inference, a KF will be as good, albeit more expensive ... then a KP will be even better, if you can find one, and it has vastly superior a/f for action subjects with the latest firmware installed, as well as much greater low-light capability.
Alternatively ... a step down/back to one of the K-5 derivatives would "only" give you 16MPixels but you'd get the two e-dials you desire, as would a step "sideways" to a K-S2, whilst retaining a 20MPixel sensor.
Probably really all depends on budget and possibly local availability.
I'm not a "pixel peeper" ... I'm still perfectly satisfied with the output from my *istD 6MPixel cameras ... and I've never bothered to come to grips with PixelShift, so I'll not comment on those parameters.
Lovely dog ... hope you have very many happy years together
10-03-2023, 03:07 PM - 2 Likes   #3
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
ramseybuckeye's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Hampstead, NC
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 17,288
I have used a K-S2 (at work) which is very similar to the K-S1, I've had a K-50, now have KP and K-3III. I think one of the biggest differences you will see will be lower light capabilities. Of course improvements in autofocus, and another is weather sealing, to go with you 33-300PLM. Of course pixel shift won't help with the dog pics, but might be useful for other things. If you haven't yet, pull up the camera comparison tool and see what improvements are useful for you.
10-03-2023, 06:40 PM - 2 Likes   #4
Des
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Des's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Victoria Australia
Photos: Albums
Posts: 6,421
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
Has anyone experienced the upgrade from the basic K-S1 to more advanced cameras like K70/KF or KP (used)? Is it worth it?
I have a K-S2 which has the same sensor as the K-S1. I also have the KP and K-3iii, and have had earlier models (K100d Super, K-30, K-3). The 20mp sensor is very sweet. Where you don't need to crop, images from the K-S2 stand up well against the 24mp and 26mp sensors. Where you see a difference between the sensors is (a) in cropping and (b) in high ISO. (The high ISO gain not so much because of the sensor - the K-S2 compares well with the K-3 in this regard - but because of the accelerator unit in the later models, such as K-70/KF, KP and K-3iii).
I went from one wheel to two in going from the K100D Super to the K-30, K-S2 and K-3 (and to three wheels on the KP and K-3iii). That's a really handy addition.

QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
Regarding image quality, I would gain 20% more Mpx and PixelShift, is it very noticeable?
PS is a nice feature, but really only for static scenes and using a tripod. As I have said, the extra mp matter mainly for cropping. If you find yourself cropping a lot, there are noticeable gains with the higher mp sensor.

For a lot of photography you can't tell the difference between images from the 20mp camera and from a 24/26mp camera.

Q1: Can you pick the K-S2 image here from the KP image (each with the 55-300 PLM), without looking? [Answer at the end of this post]




Q2 Each of these was Explored on Flickr. Without looking, could you tell which was taken with the K-S2? [Answer at the end of this post]






The later cameras have many worthwhile features and are more pleasant to use - for example, compared to the K-S2, the KP is more robust and has much better high ISO, quiet shutter, a bit better AF, better SR, better metering, and a very useful third wheel, etc. Whether these things mean better images depends on the circumstances.
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
Another variable came in the last months, while I usually shoot landscapes and portraits, now I have a dog, Flora. I must admit it's very tricky to take photos, she moves all the time and action photos are really an it or miss (luckily the 55-300mm PLM is better than my other lenses in this regard). ... As for Pentax DSLR, standing to reviews and comments, I should look at the K3 III but right now out of budget.
I don't think AF in the K-70/KF was much of an improvement on the K-S2. The KP was an incremental improvement. For photographing a lively dog, the 27 AF points would be useful, but you might still find it frustrating, even with the DA 55-300 PLM. The K-3iii was a quantum leap. For moving subjects, the K-3iii is really the business. But if it's out of budget, it's out of budget.

[Answers: Q1 - second image. Q2 - all of them.]


Last edited by Des; 10-04-2023 at 01:42 PM.
10-04-2023, 04:00 AM - 1 Like   #5
New Member




Join Date: Oct 2023
Posts: 7
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by kypfer Quote
From personal experience, though not from a K-S1, the K-70 would just about fulfil all your requirements and it would seem there are still a few cheaper examples around, so by inference, a KF will be as good, albeit more expensive ... then a KP will be even better, if you can find one, and it has vastly superior a/f for action subjects with the latest firmware installed, as well as much greater low-light capability.
On the subject of the KP, I have found one with a shutter count of about 45000 for 300 euro, maybe worth it?


QuoteOriginally posted by kypfer Quote
Lovely dog ... hope you have very many happy years together
Thank you, I hope so!

---------- Post added 10-04-23 at 04:04 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by ramseybuckeye Quote
I have used a K-S2 (at work) which is very similar to the K-S1, I've had a K-50, now have KP and K-3III. I think one of the biggest differences you will see will be lower light capabilities. Of course improvements in autofocus, and another is weather sealing, to go with you 33-300PLM. Of course pixel shift won't help with the dog pics, but might be useful for other things. If you haven't yet, pull up the camera comparison tool and see what improvements are useful for you.
Thanks for your feedback, I'm seeing that upgrading it would be more for other features I haven't though of (like the superior ISO capabilities and weather sealing). It's true that during my last holidays in the Alps I had to keep my camera closed during some days because of the rain. Also, since it was cloudy, I was limited with light in many photos.

---------- Post added 10-04-23 at 04:10 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
For a lot of photography you can't tell the difference between images from the 20mp camera and from a 24/26mp camera.
...
The later cameras have many worthwhile features and are more pleasant to use - for example, compared to the K-S2, the KP is more robust and has much better high ISO, quiet shutter, a bit better AF, better SR, better metering, and a very useful third wheel, etc. Whether these things mean better images depends on the circumstances.

I don't think AF in the K-70/KF was much of an improvement on the K-S2. The KP was an incremental improvement, but for photographing a lively dog, you might still find it frustrating, even with the DA 55-300 PLM. The K-3iii was a quantum leap. For moving subjects, the K-3iii is really the business. But if it's out of budget, it's out of budget.
First, those are great photos! They don't look like they come from the same sensor on my camera, I have a lot to improve, even for post-production. You have got a point here, changing body for the image quality alone is not worth it. I'll think about other features (still missing the second dial) and just have fun playing around with my lenses. If it happens to get a good occasion, I'll think about it. Also, K3 III should get cheaper in the next years (I hope!) so that I'd do a real upgrade on many fronts, AF included.
10-04-2023, 07:55 AM - 1 Like   #6
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Jersey C.I.
Posts: 3,586
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
On the subject of the KP, I have found one with a shutter count of about 45000 for 300 euro, maybe worth it?
I would have thought so, assuming the cosmetic condition doesn't make it look like it's "been through the wars" or otherwise "abused".
Ricoh rate the KP's shutter at 100,000 actuations Features2 | PENTAX KP | RICOH IMAGING, so 45,000 might imply "half-used", but of course there's a good chance it will last a lot longer than that.
Running up a shutter count like that can be easily achieved if the previous owner(s) did a lot of bracketing, or time-lapse, for instance.
Good luck
10-04-2023, 08:43 AM - 1 Like   #7
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Denver's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Denver Colorado
Posts: 219
I have used the K-S2 for years. Love it for all the reasons I had when I bought it. Good weather sealing (got great pics while raining in Prague). IBIS, rotating LCD screen, the list is long. I still use it. I have recently added to two cameras, the KF as it has feature improvements and still has all the things I like about the K-S2 and the K3 Monochrome as I am a long-time black and white lover, which helps me untether some from my film cameras.

10-04-2023, 01:58 PM - 1 Like   #8
Des
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Des's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Victoria Australia
Photos: Albums
Posts: 6,421
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
On the subject of the KP, I have found one with a shutter count of about 45000 for 300 euro, maybe worth it?
That seems very cheap. They usually sell for 600 Euro or more from the reputable sellers in Japan. The construction of the KP is pretty robust, but If buying without a warranty or from a private seller, you would need to be careful. You would want to be sure that this one is working fully - including all the buttons and dials. Note that the mode dial has an unlock button in the middle of it, and it is easy to break the dial if the button isn't pressed fully.

The KP is an excellent camera. For shooting wildlife and moving subjects, where you usually need a faster shutter speed and often need to shoot in less-than-ideal light, the superior high-ISO performance is very useful. I generally try not to go beyond 1600 ISO with the K-S2, but 3200 is usually good with the KP and 6400 can be acceptable. So that gives you one or two extra EV stops to work with. The 27 AF points would also be useful in photographing your dog when she is moving around.

Lovely dog BTW.
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
I have a lot to improve, even for post-production.
Improving your PP skills is a cheap and enduring way to improve your photography. There are many good instructive videos on YouTube to help you learn.

You might like to try DxO PhotoLab (support a French company!) - it's very capable and I find it easy to use. The high-ISO noise reduction is quite advanced. There are modules for all recent Pentax DSLRs and for the most popular K-mount lenses (including all the lenses you mention above). There is a new version just out (PL7). If you do get it, go for the Elite edition rather than Essentials, which is missing some of the most useful features. It's not cheap (even at current sale price), but it's money well spent. Otherwise, there are free programs like RawTherapee that many people like, if you put the time in to learning to use them.

Last edited by Des; 10-04-2023 at 03:16 PM.
10-04-2023, 02:47 PM - 1 Like   #9
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
UncleVanya's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2014
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 28,348
Like another poster I started with the k100D and moved to a k-50 (he went to the k-30) then the k-3 and finally the KP. The changes are and arenít noticeable. That sounds nuts but hear me out. I never missed two control wheels since I mostly shoot in Av or Tv mode with exposure compensation. But having both was better and I liked it. Moving to three with the KP was even better. In the same vein - 16mp shots sold as well as 24mp shots. Yes thereís a bit more cropping available but perceptual studies suggest a 2x increase in mp is needed to see much difference in the final product. Pixel peeping can make you crazy as resolution increases btw. The high mp sensors can really tax focusing and lenses in some circumstances.

Personally, Iím not sure what your expectations are with respect to the dog photography. Iíve taken many with manual focus and film - and I loved them then - but standards change.

If you need tac sharp shots of moving dogs - the question becomes how many keepers do you need? Almost any modern Pentax can deliver them - but only the K-3iii can do it at a very high rate of keepers with strong tracking.
10-04-2023, 04:04 PM - 1 Like   #10
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
steamloco76's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Pennsylvania
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,710
I highly recommend a used KP. The high ISO images are a step above all other Pentax APSC DSLRs except the K-3iii.
Also, the KP has a faster processor, more advanced metering, somewhat better AF and a better build quality than the K-70 or the new KF. Several for sale on Pentax Forums Marketplace right now.
10-04-2023, 04:25 PM - 3 Likes   #11
Des
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Des's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Victoria Australia
Photos: Albums
Posts: 6,421
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
with one dial only, it's tricky to use the manual modes (M, Tv/AV) in some conditions, mainly with moving objects
I didn't use manual modes much when I had the K100D Super, so I probably didn't notice it. But yes two dials are a big plus. Going back to only one dial on the K-S1 was an experiment that Pentax have never repeated.

Using M or TAv mode would be inconvenient with only one dial, but if you are using Tv or Av you are only adjusting one variable, so that should work shouldn't it? You could live with those modes - generally speaking, Av for static subjects, Tv for moving ones.
QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
If you need tac sharp shots of moving dogs - the question becomes how many keepers do you need? Almost any modern Pentax can deliver them - but only the K-3iii can do it at a very high rate of keepers with strong tracking.
That's true Brad. I guess the point is to learn to get at least one sharp shot each time. But as we know, it doesn't always work out that way. Sometimes the one really sharp shot isn't the best and the best isn't the sharpest. Sometimes none is really sharp.

The point is that technique matters as much as gear. Some things I've learned:
- Sometimes you can get better results on a moving subject using AF.S and a single point than with AF.C, especially with older model cameras. (With more and better AF points on newer models, auto AF settings can work better.) With AF.C the camera is constantly refocusing. If it loses a defined line, focus may be way off. If you lose focus with AF.S, you are usually already close, and you can position the selected AF point and then refocus. It's worth practising and seeing which is better for a given situation.
- Try to land the focus point on a defined edge somewhere. If you just land the point on, say, a patch of fur, the camera will struggle to focus accurately.
- Focusing on a subject coming towards you (like your second shot in the original post) is really difficult. You might need AF.C and auto for this. Try using a narrower aperture for a wider depth of field to increase the odds.
- The techniques in this article are worth studying and practising over and over for all handheld shooting: Making the Most of Long Exposure Handhelds - Introduction - In-Depth Articles
- Getting the right shutter speed requires practice. The old rule of thumb for 35mm cameras to avoid camera movement blur was at least 1/focal length (e.g. 1/300th second for a 300mm lens). With Shake Reduction, and good technique, you can now go a lot slower where necessary. But if the subject is moving even a little, you generally need a good deal faster than the rule of thumb. For birds hopping around, I would now start at 1/500th or 1//640th at 300mm. For birds in flight 1/1250th or 1/1600th at least. For a bouncy dog, I would guess at least 1/800th or 1/1000th at 300mm. You need to experiment to see what works. I don't know what the shutter speed was in the shot in the original post in this thread, but I suspect that the speed was too slow.
- If you are getting consistent front- or back-focus, calibrate with AF fine adjustment.
- Using the 55-300 PLM, if you are at 300mm f6.3 and you need a little more aperture to compensate for a faster shutter speed, you can back off to about 260mm where the maximum aperture is f5.6. This can help focus accuracy too - f5.6 is something of a tipping point for AF. The lens is still very good wide open.
- Processing is no substitute for focus accuracy and an adequate shutter speed, but you may be able to sharpen up the image by judicious use of the AI-driven noise reduction in programs like DxO PL or Topaz. Also using local adjustments and increasing microcontrast and clarity (not too much!) can help. The sharpen tool is a last resort IMO - it's too crude and often leaves artefacts. The detail extractor filter in Nik Color Efex Pro (either the DxO version or the old free Google version) can work well too.

Last edited by Des; 10-04-2023 at 04:34 PM.
10-04-2023, 11:20 PM   #12
New Member




Join Date: Oct 2023
Posts: 7
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by kypfer Quote
I would have thought so, assuming the cosmetic condition doesn't make it look like it's "been through the wars" or otherwise "abused".
Ricoh rate the KP's shutter at 100,000 actuations Features2 | PENTAX KP | RICOH IMAGING, so 45,000 might imply "half-used", but of course there's a good chance it will last a lot longer than that.
Running up a shutter count like that can be easily achieved if the previous owner(s) did a lot of bracketing, or time-lapse, for instance.
Good luck
Luckily this KP is in my city, I can get my hands on it before buying. Shouldn't be in a "been through the wars" state though

Does the bracketing put more stress on the shutter than single actuations?

---------- Post added 10-04-23 at 11:27 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
Note that the mode dial has an unlock button in the middle of it, and it is easy to break the dial if the button isn't pressed fully.
Good to know, I'll check this out.


QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
The KP is an excellent camera. For shooting wildlife and moving subjects, where you usually need a faster shutter speed and often need to shoot in less-than-ideal light, the superior high-ISO performance is very useful. I generally try not to go beyond 1600 ISO with the K-S2, but 3200 is usually good with the KP and 6400 can be acceptable. So that gives you one or two extra EV stops to work with. The 27 AF points would also be useful in photographing your dog when she is moving around.
I suspect that going down with ISO would have helped when I tried to shoot in low light condition (cloudy in a forest).


QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
You might like to try DxO PhotoLab (support a French company!) - it's very capable and I find it easy to use. The high-ISO noise reduction is quite advanced. There are modules for all recent Pentax DSLRs and for the most popular K-mount lenses (including all the lenses you mention above). There is a new version just out (PL7). If you do get it, go for the Elite edition rather than Essentials, which is missing some of the most useful features. It's not cheap (even at current sale price), but it's money well spent. Otherwise, there are free programs like RawTherapee that many people like, if you put the time in to learning to use them.
Thanks for the insights! Funny thing is that I work in software development for a multimedia company, more focused on video streaming. I'll check with my colleagues if they know DxO. I'm going to give it a look, seems interesting. And even job related for me.

---------- Post added 10-04-23 at 11:39 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
Like another poster I started with the k100D and moved to a k-50 (he went to the k-30) then the k-3 and finally the KP. The changes are and arenít noticeable. That sounds nuts but hear me out. I never missed two control wheels since I mostly shoot in Av or Tv mode with exposure compensation. But having both was better and I liked it. Moving to three with the KP was even better. In the same vein - 16mp shots sold as well as 24mp shots. Yes thereís a bit more cropping available but perceptual studies suggest a 2x increase in mp is needed to see much difference in the final product. Pixel peeping can make you crazy as resolution increases btw. The high mp sensors can really tax focusing and lenses in some circumstances.
Yes, I'm seeing that it is better to focus on obtaining good final results from the shoots and 20mp are more than enough.


QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
Personally, Iím not sure what your expectations are with respect to the dog photography. Iíve taken many with manual focus and film - and I loved them then - but standards change.

If you need tac sharp shots of moving dogs - the question becomes how many keepers do you need? Almost any modern Pentax can deliver them - but only the K-3iii can do it at a very high rate of keepers with strong tracking.
To tell the truth the issue I'm facing is that most of the shots are blurry. If I go down too much with exposure time photos are too dark. I have this issue mainly while taking photos indoor. Maybe ISO is not enough, but if I go down over 800 I start not liking the results.

---------- Post added 10-05-23 at 12:03 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
The point is that technique matters as much as gear. Some things I've learned:
- Sometimes you can get better results on a moving subject using AF.S and a single point than with AF.C, especially with older model cameras. (With more and better AF points on newer models, auto AF settings can work better.) With AF.C the camera is constantly refocusing. If it loses a defined line, focus may be way off. If you lose focus with AF.S, you are usually already close, and you can position the selected AF point and then refocus. It's worth practising and seeing which is better for a given situation.
- Try to land the focus point on a defined edge somewhere. If you just land the point on, say, a patch of fur, the camera will struggle to focus accurately.
- Focusing on a subject coming towards you (like your second shot in the original post) is really difficult. You might need AF.C and auto for this. Try using a narrower aperture for a wider depth of field to increase the odds.
- The techniques in this article are worth studying and practising over and over for all handheld shooting: Making the Most of Long Exposure Handhelds - Introduction - In-Depth Articles
- Getting the right shutter speed requires practice. The old rule of thumb for 35mm cameras to avoid camera movement blur was at least 1/focal length (e.g. 1/300th second for a 300mm lens). With Shake Reduction, and good technique, you can now go a lot slower where necessary. But if the subject is moving even a little, you generally need a good deal faster than the rule of thumb. For birds hopping around, I would now start at 1/500th or 1//640th at 300mm. For birds in flight 1/1250th or 1/1600th at least. For a bouncy dog, I would guess at least 1/800th or 1/1000th at 300mm. You need to experiment to see what works. I don't know what the shutter speed was in the shot in the original post in this thread, but I suspect that the speed was too slow.
- If you are getting consistent front- or back-focus, calibrate with AF fine adjustment.
- Using the 55-300 PLM, if you are at 300mm f6.3 and you need a little more aperture to compensate for a faster shutter speed, you can back off to about 260mm where the maximum aperture is f5.6. This can help focus accuracy too - f5.6 is something of a tipping point for AF. The lens is still very good wide open.
So many advises, Pentax users don't disappoint!
To tell the truth, I have started playing with different AF modes only recently. The same with the 55-300mm, I need more time with it. For sure I agree that stopping at 250-260mm is like a sweet point, going up to 300mm doesn't give you that much more. As for shutter speed, I have issue going up to 1/800th, photos get very dark. Again, maybe I need a sunny day out.


QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
- Processing is no substitute for focus accuracy and an adequate shutter speed, but you may be able to sharpen up the image by judicious use of the AI-driven noise reduction in programs like DxO PL or Topaz. Also using local adjustments and increasing microcontrast and clarity (not too much!) can help. The sharpen tool is a last resort IMO - it's too crude and often leaves artefacts. The detail extractor filter in Nik Color Efex Pro (either the DxO version or the old free Google version) can work well too.
I'm not a big fan of applying AI to photos, I dislike the rendering of photos from smartphones because they don't "reflect " the reality (whatever reality means). Anyway, I should see it like applying filters to images, a way to improve them and not to add new information. Again, I'll have a look at DxO software.

Right now I use the Digital Camera Utility from Pentax, I shoot in RAW (I prefer them). From what I have seen it offers the same processing available on camera, so nothing advanced.
10-05-2023, 12:24 AM - 1 Like   #13
Des
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Des's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Victoria Australia
Photos: Albums
Posts: 6,421
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
Luckily this KP is in my city, I can get my hands on it before buying. Shouldn't be in a "been through the wars" state though
If it really is in good condition, it could be a great buy at that price. Personally I wouldn't worry too much about the shutter count, more about the condition of the camera. Have a look at the sensor with strong light and magnifier (e.g. a loupe with LED lights), and try a shot at f22 to see whether there are any scratches on the sensor coating. Also check that the rear screen tilts and works properly and check as many buttons and dials as possible.
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
To tell the truth the issue I'm facing is that most of the shots are blurry. If I go down too much with exposure time photos are too dark. I have this issue mainly while taking photos indoor. Maybe ISO is not enough, but if I go down over 800 I start not liking the results.
This is a constant dilemma. When the light is not great, do you compromise on shutter speed, aperture or ISO? You can only answer this from experience, trying different settings with your camera/lens combination.

You should be able to get satisfactory results at 1600 ISO with the K-S1, and 3200 where necessary, if you shoot RAW and process with good software. Here's the K-S2 at 2500 ISO after processing in PhotoLab:


If you can get PhotoLab as a tax deduction, so much the better!

The other option is flash. Get one with a tilt and swivel head so that indoors you can bounce the light off the walls and ceiling. You can also use flash outdoors for fill.

Last edited by Des; 10-05-2023 at 09:11 PM.
10-05-2023, 08:51 AM   #14
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Jersey C.I.
Posts: 3,586
QuoteOriginally posted by ShyGuy Quote
Luckily this KP is in my city, I can get my hands on it before buying. Shouldn't be in a "been through the wars" state though
Does the bracketing put more stress on the shutter than single actuations?
Not more "stress", as such, but if the previous owner was in the habit of over and under exposing half a stop "just in case", or even regularly in burst mode (spray and pray), it means the shutter count could potentially be a lot higher than the actual amount of "keepers" taken, so the overall wear on the camera would be less than if all exposures were taken as correctly framed and exposed single entities.
I'm a great fan of "getting it right" first time, irrespective of the subject, (unless it's something really special, like a pod of dolphins passing!), so some of my cameras tend to exhibit what I would consider wear commensurate with their use ... scruffy
10-06-2023, 03:04 AM - 1 Like   #15
New Member




Join Date: Oct 2023
Posts: 7
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
This is a constant dilemma. When the light is not great, do you compromise on shutter speed, aperture or ISO? You can only answer this from experience, trying different settings with your camera/lens combination.

You should be able to get satisfactory results at 1600 ISO with the K-S1, and 3200 where necessary, if you shoot RAW and process with good software. Here's the K-S2 at 2500 ISO after processing in PhotoLab:
I'm seeing that I need to play more with a wider range of ISO values and think seriously about PP software. New things to try, I like it.

---------- Post added 10-06-23 at 03:09 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by kypfer Quote
Not more "stress", as such, but if the previous owner was in the habit of over and under exposing half a stop "just in case", or even regularly in burst mode (spray and pray), it means the shutter count could potentially be a lot higher than the actual amount of "keepers" taken, so the overall wear on the camera would be less than if all exposures were taken as correctly framed and exposed single entities.
I'm a great fan of "getting it right" first time, irrespective of the subject, (unless it's something really special, like a pod of dolphins passing!), so some of my cameras tend to exhibit what I would consider wear commensurate with their use ... scruffy
Got it, very informative. Love the "spray and pray" definition
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
55-300mm, camera, capabilities, course, dog, dslr, features, focus, hope, images, improvements, iso, k-s1, kit, kp, lenses, light, modes, pentax, photography, photos, plm, ricoh, software, time, upgrade, weather
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Considering Upgrade From K-S1 duglew60 Pentax K-3 & K-3 II 7 01-19-2022 09:15 PM
Q Owner: Q-S1 worth the upgrade? New Q anytime soon? zwmg Pentax Q 24 11-11-2016 08:43 PM
K-S1 firmware upgrade to 1.20 Clothears Pentax K-S1 & K-S2 15 08-12-2016 05:25 PM
Ricoh UK online store: K-S1,18-55 and bag £229.99. Q-S1 7 lens kit £599.99 DanGleabols Pentax Price Watch 2 11-26-2015 05:43 PM
Q-S1 and K-S1 New Naming? LaurenOE General Photography 8 08-21-2014 09:36 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:09 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top