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03-21-2007, 07:15 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by FotoPete Quote
Like in visual arts class, the teacher kept showing us Monets and Piscasos. Ok nice but did I learn anything about how to paint? no...

I guess it was a case by case basis. most of my visual arts stuff back in high school were just case studies of paintings and historical stuff and I never really got the connection. My friend actually took a photography course and they taught him alot of famous photographers. Like I never recalled getting alot of practical know-how. it was all just about critques and stuff.

I was afraid these photography courses were of the same structure and thats why I didn't see the usefulness in them.
Looks like you've had some poor experiences with such courses. The one that I took was solely about portraits and portrait lighting. The instructor was a former professional photographer who was unable to take photos anymore, and so he taught. He showed a few photos (magazine cutouts, actually) that demonstrated specific lighting styles, but mostly talked and used models and lights. We had a weekly assignment on a certain lighting ratio and he would comment and critique. I learned a great deal about lighting ratios, positioning of lights, some technical aspects regarding modifying light, use of DOF for portraits, adjusting for colour balances and mixed lighting, etc...

03-21-2007, 07:27 PM   #17
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I learned to drive the same way...

QuoteOriginally posted by FotoPete Quote
haha. Lemme guess. The class roster full of Kit Rebellers?

IMO, I think this photography thing is dependent largely on experimentation. Its one thing to learn how the famous guys did it, but something more if we garner our abilities from our experiences.

Like I didn't take any photography class. I'm mostly gained from just being creative and experimenting alot.
Wrote off three cars and spent 12 months in jail, but saved a bunch of money on driving lessons.

(Just kidding around
03-22-2007, 05:49 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by *isteve Quote
Wrote off three cars and spent 12 months in jail, but saved a bunch of money on driving lessons.

(Just kidding around
LOL. Thanks
03-22-2007, 08:32 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by MikeH Quote
Looks like you've had some poor experiences with such courses.
That was my thought, too. I took an evening course at the local arts college, and it was a very interesting mix. We covered the technical side, including B&W film developing and printing, but that was only a small part of the course. We spent a lot of time looking at photographs by a wide variety of well-known photographers, the point being to understand what made those great photographs. And we were expected to shoot lots of film, with the goal of producing ten photos on a theme by the end of the course. It was a lot of fun, I learned a great deal about what makes a good photograph (not that you can tell...) and got to understand photography in the context of its history, as well. Experimentation is an important way of learning, but it helps to know what experiments have been done before! You get to stand on the shoulders of giants... if you're lucky enough to have a good teacher who can help you up there.

Julie

03-23-2007, 12:24 AM   #20
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Take the class

I suggest that you take the class - if for no other reason than to be exposed to other individuals interpretations. I attended a Photo Workshop in Santa Fe (National Geographic Expedition - Assignment Santa Fe) and was taken back at the variety of interpretation of basically common subject matter. There were 22 people in the class with three instructors (Lead by Bob Sacha - a National Geographic multiple article photographer) and it was interesting to see how the class members worked. We spent a total of 3 hours out of the week talking about equipment - the rest of the time we talked images - because that is what we all do this for - it's all about the image.
You will gain in technique and appreciation of both others work and your own. During our daily review of the previous days work - the experience of listening to other people react to your work is worth all the effort. On the third day I thought I was pretty much not up to par with some of the other people - that's when one of them came over while we were selecting the days work and said "I really like your images", this was specially nice when the instructors (20-30+ years as pro photographers) came over and said basicly the same thing.
I learned how to shoot by reading (Time-Life 20 volume series on photography) shooting (bought B&W film in 100 ft rolls) and interacting with my buddies (one C*non bigot (he really was) and a Ol*mpus guy). For fun we would go off to shoot and take one lens - the one lens that was picked by one of the other guys. We did challenge each other to adapt. The interaction between the class members is one of the most educational aspects of taking classes.
Just remember to critique not bash - leave the "my camera manufacture is better than yours" out in the playground where it belongs.
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03-23-2007, 04:42 AM   #21
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You know, it was the photography class I had in high school that got me into Pentax, as all they had were K1000's. Teacher felt that you needed to start with a manual to "appreciate" what today's automatics can do for you.
03-23-2007, 05:02 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by FireMate Quote
You know, it was the photography class I had in high school that got me into Pentax, as all they had were K1000's. Teacher felt that you needed to start with a manual to "appreciate" what today's automatics can do for you.

The instructor for this class insists that only manual mode be used while in the class. I'm wondering if she will also require that manual focus be used.

She has also indicated that there is to be no PP of photos taken in concert with the class. Which, I think is a good idea as part of the class is the critiqueing of the photos.
03-23-2007, 08:11 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by EddyinGA Quote
The instructor for this class insists that only manual mode be used while in the class. I'm wondering if she will also require that manual focus be used.

She has also indicated that there is to be no PP of photos taken in concert with the class. Which, I think is a good idea as part of the class is the critiqueing of the photos.
Sounds like it's going to be a good class Eddy. From now on we expect you to produce at least one "stunner" a week (just kidding) The New York Botanical Gardens regularily puts on photo classes but unfortunately they are prohibitively expensive. I really should check out the local community colleges. Thanks for the tip.

NaCl(then I have to make the time)H2O

03-23-2007, 08:24 AM   #24
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I agree about the no PP. We did it in Santa Fe - most of the students were using film - and slide film at that. I had no problem with it - I was shooting film and digital -- not reccomended to shoot both -- I shoot digital as if it were slide film anyway. Use the whole frame - do not crop (unless it is absolutely necessary) - expose for the highlights (pure white in digital is equivalent to clear film in slides - can't do a thing with it). The manual everything is a bit harsh - the film camera I used was all manual, purchased in 1970 - and modern cameras do not have simple things like DOF markings on the lenses.
Enjoy your class.
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03-23-2007, 10:31 PM   #25
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....and I'm not being sarcastic when I say this but, the more you learn about anything, the more you realise that there is so much more to learn.
....and that standing on the shoulders of the 'greats' who preceeded you is a more sure route to success than continually trying to "re-invent the wheel".
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