Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
04-24-2009, 01:05 PM   #1
Junior Member




Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 44
Km or K200?

Hello all,

Thanks for such an informative forum.

I am moving up to my first DSLR camera from various P&S models (since about 2004). I've been reading forums, review sites, blogs, for months. Call me crazy, but after waiting for my initial choice-- the Canon XSI-- to come down in price for awhile, I found myself doing more and more looking at Pentax, particularly once I started looking into lenses. In terms of cost for feature, Pentax just seems like a solid option for building a system (though I'm aware that some Pentaxians see the glass as half empty when these comparisons arise ).

I'm a father of two (ages six and three), so the usual desires (indoor low light shots, travel, kids' hobbies and sports) apply to me in terms of what I will tend to shoot.

After my reading, it sounds as if the Km may be the right choice for me. Small, intuitive, and a little more responsive than other Pentax bodies to date (I've shot a bit with a Canon XTI, which seems pretty quick to me). Lots of features for the price point. Some of its drawbacks relative to the K200-- number of autofocus points, weather sealing-- seem nice to haves rather than deal breakers.

In terms of lenses, was thinking of going with the Tamron 17-50 2.8 given that most of my photos are of the indoor, domestic variety. Will probably look around for a longer zoom companion to it (when the wallet recovers, I have my eye on the DA* 50-135 ).

Any thoughts on a body choice, or other suggestions, would be welcome.

thanks!

-skoob

04-24-2009, 03:55 PM   #2
Pentaxian
jimH's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: South Central Nebraska - USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,413
QuoteOriginally posted by skoobie Quote
Hello all,

Thanks for such an informative forum.

I am moving up to my first DSLR camera from various P&S models (since about 2004). I've been reading forums, review sites, blogs, for months. Call me crazy, but after waiting for my initial choice-- the Canon XSI-- to come down in price for awhile, I found myself doing more and more looking at Pentax, particularly once I started looking into lenses. In terms of cost for feature, Pentax just seems like a solid option for building a system (though I'm aware that some Pentaxians see the glass as half empty when these comparisons arise ).

I'm a father of two (ages six and three), so the usual desires (indoor low light shots, travel, kids' hobbies and sports) apply to me in terms of what I will tend to shoot.

After my reading, it sounds as if the Km may be the right choice for me. Small, intuitive, and a little more responsive than other Pentax bodies to date (I've shot a bit with a Canon XTI, which seems pretty quick to me). Lots of features for the price point. Some of its drawbacks relative to the K200-- number of autofocus points, weather sealing-- seem nice to haves rather than deal breakers.

In terms of lenses, was thinking of going with the Tamron 17-50 2.8 given that most of my photos are of the indoor, domestic variety. Will probably look around for a longer zoom companion to it (when the wallet recovers, I have my eye on the DA* 50-135 ).

Any thoughts on a body choice, or other suggestions, would be welcome.

thanks!

-skoob
I like my K-10D, but what you are looking at has the same resolution as the K-10D. The KM or the K200 should fit your requirements quite well. One of the issues that help to make the Pentax DSLR's more price efficient is the in-body shake reduction capabilities.

Some of the other cameras put the shake reduction in the lens thereby making the lenses comparably much more expensive, when comparing the quality of the optics themselves. This applies also to older lenses that you might acquire that were made before shake reduction was even a gleam in a lens engineer's eye.

Pentax has made exceptional cameras for decades. In fact Pentax was the originator of the "Penta Prism" a five sided prism, used in the viewfinder of many Single Reflex Cameras; (Many cheaper SLR's use a mirror which doesn't transmit as much light into the viewfinder as a prism), the high end Pentax and other high end SLR's use a Penta Prism. I believe that fact contributed to the name of the camera "Pentax".

I've used Pentax cameras for over 30 years and have always been happy with them. They aren't glitzy, but they are quality.

JimH
04-24-2009, 04:42 PM   #3
Junior Member




Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 44
Original Poster
Thanks, Jim. The in-camera stabilization was really a key feature for me.

I forgot to mention one thing in my original post-- I intend to take some photography classes with my new camera. I realize the K10/K20 class puts the most manual control at your fingertips; is there a meaningful distinction between the K2000 and K200 that would make one a better choice as I learn more?
04-24-2009, 05:22 PM   #4
Pentaxian
jimH's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: South Central Nebraska - USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,413
QuoteOriginally posted by skoobie Quote
Thanks, Jim. The in-camera stabilization was really a key feature for me.

I forgot to mention one thing in my original post-- I intend to take some photography classes with my new camera. I realize the K10/K20 class puts the most manual control at your fingertips; is there a meaningful distinction between the K2000 and K200 that would make one a better choice as I learn more?
I guess that I would say the K10 and K20 bodies are built tougher and are physically heavier than the smaller, lighter Km, K2000 and K200 issues. More of a "semi-pro" grade of camera. Of course the price alone helps point that out. There are an awfully lot of very satisfied *ist, K100, K110, K200 etc users. It all depends on how hard you are going to use the camera and how much money you want to dedicate to a camera.

Keep in mind also that there is a strong rumor that Pentax is soon going to introduce yet another "higher end" camera, reportedly the K7D, which will be the successor to the K20D. So I'd say, buy the camera body that fits your needs, and invest in some good glass that will transfer to another Pentax body as your needs change or your old on wears out. Key is that you have to like the camera that you buy, and don't make it so complicated that you spend all of your time trying to learn to use the camera and less time actually using it.

To answer your question concerning the K200 vs the K2000, I guess I'd choose the K200 over the Km or K2000 since the latter two are built as price competitive models and possibly have fewer features then the K200.

JimH


Last edited by jimH; 04-25-2009 at 06:30 AM.
04-25-2009, 04:22 AM   #5
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Budapest
Posts: 821
Only you know which body is better for you, nobody else. There are a few differences between the two models, you can compare them at any website about digital cameras. Make a list of what things (features) are important to you and see which model have most of those.
If K-m satisfies your needs then buy it. If K200D has more important features to you then buy that. Only you know what is important to you. Both models are great, so selecting one is up to personal preference only.
04-25-2009, 05:18 AM   #6
Veteran Member
mickey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Japan
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,073
If it were me, I'd go for the 200.
Both excellent cameras.
K-m feels a bit small for me...maybe cus I'm using a hefty K10, though and I'm used to holding that.

Keep trying them in the shops, going through the menus.
You'll begin to get the feel for one

You'll be happy with either.
04-25-2009, 08:09 AM   #7
Veteran Member
ManuH's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Montreal
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,209
QuoteOriginally posted by skoobie Quote
I'm a father of two (ages six and three), so the usual desires (indoor low light shots, travel, kids' hobbies and sports) apply to me in terms of what I will tend to shoot.
I'm also a father of two (aged 2 and 7). With the younger one I much prefer the K-m for its small size and its capability of being operated with just one hand (all the controls are on the right). I also often use the kit lens or the DA40 in daylight because it's so light and unobstrusive.

For low-light I prefer my K20D because it has less noise and you can select the AF points (more critical with fast lenses like the 50/1.4 or 35/2).
04-25-2009, 12:55 PM   #8
Pentaxian
Marc Sabatella's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10,686
QuoteOriginally posted by skoobie Quote
I forgot to mention one thing in my original post-- I intend to take some photography classes with my new camera. I realize the K10/K20 class puts the most manual control at your fingertips; is there a meaningful distinction between the K2000 and K200 that would make one a better choice as I learn more?
There are certainly *some* controls that the K10D/K20D make more readily available than the K200D/K-m - thing like changing from multi-segment metering to center-weighted to spot. And *some* photographers make more extensive use of those sorts of controls than others. But I wouldn't say it's a given that as you learn more you'll need those. I like to think that I've learned a thing or two, and one of them is that I'm perfectly happy leaving most of those settings in one place and getting really good at understanding how my camera works with those settings.

Really, the only settings you *need* to change often are aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. The K20D makes changing ISO somewhat easier than the K200D/K-m, but fortunately it doesn't need to be changed as often as the others, so it's not *that* big a deal. But as a K200D owner, it's the one feature of the K20D I envy the most. The viewfinder would be second, but I'm actually OK with the K200D viewfinder, too. I don't find manual focus significantly harder than I did with the *istDS I had previously, and the DS viewfinder is the same as the K20D. Still, every bit helps, which is why I use the O-ME53 magnifier to bring the size (if not brightness) of the K200D viewfinder in line with that of the K20D.

Speaking of manual focus - if you plan to use many older manual focus lenses, the K200D is a better chocie than the K-m, not because of a difference in the viewfinder, but because of a difference in functionality. The K200D is capable of displaying a meter reading with fully manual lenses (via the DOF preview function); the K-m is not. You can still ue the older lenses on the K-m, but you have to trust the semi-automatic method of using them - set aperture, hit button to let camera choose shutter speed for you. I prefer being able to see the data upon which the camera makes that decision. But others use manual lenses without ever using the feature I am talking about.

04-25-2009, 05:04 PM   #9
Junior Member




Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 44
Original Poster
Thanks so much for all the helpful advice.

I'm leaning towards the K-m based on the fact that I think I can get a very good deal on it, which leaves me an opportunity to put some money towards lenses early on.

I read in a few places that the K-m may look silly with some of the longer zoom lenses, but I'll grin and bear it if I pick up one. Eventually I will acquire another body, I'd guess (maybe a used K10 or K20). In the meantime, I think the K-m may be a good camera for my wife as well.

Thanks to you, Marc, I now understand a little bit about the DOF preview; I would certainly like to explore some of the older Pentax glass, so may look to a body in the future that has that feature.

Beyond the kit lens, what would be a good first lens acquisition?

-s
04-26-2009, 12:39 AM   #10
Senior Member




Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: west coast USA
Posts: 206
Some of the other things the K200D has over the K-m include ability to select an off-center autofocus point, DC input jack, wired remote jack (both cameras have wireless remote sensors on the front), top LCD panel, orientation sensor (pictures taken vertically show up that way).

What you get with the K-m includes smaller and lighter body, ISO 3200, even more in-camera processing toys, an improved interface that is in some ways faster to use than the other models.

Based on what you've said, I too would lean toward the K-m. I personally chose a K200D, but that was because some of the differences were important for what I wanted to do.
04-26-2009, 07:19 AM   #11
Veteran Member
kevinschoenmakers's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Shanghai
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,513
QuoteQuote:
Beyond the kit lens, what would be a good first lens acquisition?
This fully depends on what you what to take pictures of. If you don't have any idea what focal length you use the most, I'd buy the kitlens (which is a fine lens in it's own right) first and find out what you miss. If you often want to zoom in beyond 55mm, get a zoom of some kind, if you want to take wider angle shots, get, for example, a DA 12-24.
Futhermore, it's pretty much 'you get what you pay for' when it comes to lenses. This is a good website to compare lenses with: Pentax Lens Tests, and so is the lens review part of these forums. But again, what lens fits your needs depends on what you want to photograph. I bought a 50-200mm lens right away, and don't really use it often enough to warrant the buy.

In short, get a kitlens, play around and see what you feel you lack.
04-27-2009, 01:34 AM   #12
Forum Member




Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Bangkok, Thaland
Posts: 80
Skoobie, if I were you , go for the K200d. I have the same problem of choosing between the K-M and the K200 but everything was solved when I went to the store and tried in my hands the two cams. Yes the K-M is smaller but when it comes to my hands the K200 feels better. and take note in slow shutter speeds a heavier camera is more stabilized.
04-30-2009, 09:48 PM   #13
Senior Member
rpriedhorsky's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 210
QuoteOriginally posted by skoobie Quote
Beyond the kit lens, what would be a good first lens acquisition?
I'd suggest a superzoom, such as the Sigma 18-125 (hard to find, but a superb deal for the money - got mine for $160) or the Pentax/Tamron 18-250 (modulo some QC issues -- check that the vignetting is satisfactory and symmetric before the return period runs out). This will let you inexpensively discover the focal lengths that you're most interested in.

However, as others have noted, the kit lens is very good and may be all you need for now.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, canon, choice, dslr, km, lenses, pentax, photography, price, terms, thanks
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thinking about getting a used K200 ecoronin Pentax DSLR Discussion 14 11-16-2009 10:00 PM
My first try with the K200! jasonz Post Your Photos! 12 06-21-2009 07:28 PM
New K200 martin_metal_88 Pentax DSLR Discussion 5 10-23-2008 08:04 AM
New K200 rober Pentax DSLR Discussion 3 10-03-2008 11:47 AM
First few pics with new k200 bsproule Post Your Photos! 6 08-16-2008 02:32 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:39 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top